What I Learn About My Ancient Ancestry (Geno 2 Project)

Here is what I learned about my ancient ancestry:

I AM

Neanderthal Man

0.7%

NEANDERTHAL

Modern Man

As humans were first migrating out of Africa more than 60,000 years ago, Neanderthals were still living in Eurasia. It seems our ancestors hit it off, leaving a small trace of these ancient relatives in my DNA.

I AM

  • 79% Western Africa

  • 5% Northwestern Europe

  • 4% Eastern Africa

  • 4% West Mediterranean

  • 3% Northeastern Europe

  • 3% Eastern Europe

MY MAP

MY MATERNAL LINEAGE BEGAN ABOUT 150,000 YEARS AGO.

My maternal ancestors spread from east-central Africa to northwestern Africa at a time when the climate and landscape were more hospitable. They settled from the central-West African coast to North Africa. In the north, my cousins are now part of populations such as the Berber peoples. The Berbers are traditionally livestock herders. Toward west-central Africa, I have cousins among traditional farming groups.

My maternal branch is L2a1a2

Maternal Map

MY PATERNAL LINEAGE BEGAN AT LEAST 180,000 YEARS AGO.

My paternal ancestors spread from Central Africa to West Africa. My cousins include the Bantu-speaking people. The Bantu had an advanced farming culture, and were the first people in sub-Saharan Africa to work iron. Later expansions to the east and south introduced agriculture across Africa and spread the Bantu languages throughout the continent.

My paternal branch is E-U186

Paternal Map

That’s my story. What’s your story?

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Tracing Your African Roots

The Sokko: exploring ethnic possibilities. Roots the Dutch version *** Op zoek naar Afrikaanse roots via DNA & genealogisch en historisch onderzoek.

via ROOTS.NL (S1E2) – Searching for Gold — Tracing African Roots

Who are your ancestors, Can you identify your relatives?

We are all over this world in many countries, with differences, shades of color, opinions, thoughts. Make no mistake we are one, our ancestors came out of Africa. It’s in your DNA. I have found relatives in Brazil, India, Iran, Syria, Australia, Mexico, Boro Bora, Korea, China, and Japan. Never stop your journey finding your past. Gedmatch is a good place to start.

DNA collection, testing, and results are different for people of color and the algorithms used are not geared towards our DNA but can be very useful.  It is Eurocentric, however, Helix, National Geo2, and 23andMe are moving towards a more inclusive model. Also, there are new projects in many countries to match DNA for people around the world.

 

 

 

Finding More DNA Cousins for Free

Finding More DNA Cousins for FREE

July 13, 2017

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AdaEze Naja Chinyere Njoku

 

Hello Family!

We sure hope you all are doing well.  We know that many of you that have taken the autosomal DNA test at FTDNA.com 23andme.com , Ancestry.com or MyHeritage.com are waiting patiently for that breakthrough of finding an Africa DNA match.  

Some of us are not being so patient.  Logging into the accounts 7 to 10 times daily, yelling at folks because we can’t find that match.  Talking to ourselves AND responding..  Creeping up on your computer from the side, like agent 007….  Acting as if it is hiding that match from you.  It’s OK.  We’ve been there too.  Please read a book or go fishing or something Shuga.  More people are testing.  We have to be patient.  It took some of us over 7 YEARS to get an Africa DNA match.  Oh but when we did!!!! 

 

Now, we are not going to lie to you.  We all know that there is NO GUARANTEE that you will find an Africa DNA match.  Here are some ways to widen the net though.  These helpful options are steps that I have taken myself.  They have proven to be very helpful especially since many people have DNA tested at one company and have elected NOT to test at another.  

There is a place where your DNA raw data can go and meet up with other people’s DNA raw data that tested at different DNA testing companies.   You all can chillax for FREE!!  OK.. Let me clarify…. Its like a meet up for ya raw data.

The goal is to upload your DNA raw data to the websites that you have not tested or to the sites like Gedmatch.com to help you compare shared segments on Chromosomes between you and others that have also uploaded.

Read more: DNAtestedafricans.org

Do You Know Who You Are? Do You Know Your Ancestors?

 

DNA

Those of us who had ancestors living in slavery in South Carolina Low Country, North Carolina and Georgia were likely from Senegal and Sierra-Leone. Do you know who you are, did you have ancestors on a plantation in these areas particularly?  A slave who could manage escape did not go north but to Florida  Seminole territory.

What pulled me in this direction was the multitude of matches from Brazil, Mexico, Iran, Syria and the Caribbean. I started to see names such as Sadi, Jahid, Fahid, Dajzar, and Raza.

Wrong or right, the surnames we are using are not our own. They bind us to the earth as a human being. Looking beyond that our ancestor used a different name. So when I see the strange names I want to dig for more. DNA has given us the opportunity to see the world internationally not narrowly focused.

The picture below is of Abraham, a Black Seminole Leader in the Second Seminole War.

 

Help Drive Research Forward for African Americans

23andMe Post

We believe genetics and the study of disease should be for everyone.
All ethnicities. All people.

Help drive research forward for African Americans.

Join now!

Questions: contact study-help@23andMe.com

Why your help is so important.

Less than 5% of research on the genetics of disease includes people of African ancestry. If people with diverse ancestries continue to be underrepresented in genetics research, then we risk missing key medical and other scientific discoveries that could benefit everyone.

If you participate in the African American Sequencing Project, you could help address this disparity. By sharing your genetic data with the scientific community, you can shape the future of genetics research to include people of African descent.

Only a fraction of genetic research studies have included people of African descent.

Popejoy, A. B. & Fullerton, S. M. Nature 538, 161-164 (2016).

See if you’re eligible

To be eligible for this study you must be a 23andMe customer, have consented to 23andMe Research, self identify as African or African American and be at least 18 years old.

How it works

You do not need to provide a new saliva sample — we will use the one you already sent us.

There is no cost to participate.

You consent to share your genetic data.

Enroll and agree to share your de-identified genetic information with researchers approved by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and qualified research partners of 23andMe.

None of your contact information or answers to 23andMe surveys will be shared.

We will sequence your genome.

If you are selected, we will send your saliva sample, already provided to 23andMe, to a lab for whole genome sequencing. Whole genome sequencing is a more thorough but also more costly review of your genome than that provided by the genotyping analysis used to generate your 23andMe reports. *This is extremely important. The real cost to an individual is about $1200 with most labs. Entire genome sequencing means all of your DNA in your body. I am a member of the Ethnicity Research Group studying and identify the location specific location of African and African-American ancestors and I also participate in the L2 study group, this later group requires identification with a person of African origin. right now these two groups are closed.

For more information on sequencing versus genotyping watch this video or read this article.

We will provide data to researchers around the world.

23andMe will share this sequenced genetic data with researchers by depositing it into a scientific database approved by the NIH. Approved researchers will have access to this data to conduct genetics research.

About this project

In October 2016, 23andMe was awarded a grant by the National Human Genome Research Institute, a major research arm of the National Institutes of Health, to fund the African American Sequencing Project.

This project is part of our broad commitment to diversity in genetics research. Learn more about 23andMe’s Roots into the Future Project.

Privacy and Security

We do not share your genetic information without your explicit authorization. Only you can decide if you would like to participate in this project by authorizing 23andMe to share your information with outside researchers.

Even though you previously consented to participate in 23andMe Research, you will need to read and accept additional consents to participate in this study.

Hi. Have additional questions about the African American Sequencing Project?

If you don’t see your question here, get in touch with us.

  • What does it mean to be a research participant in this project?

  • Why is 23andMe conducting the African American Sequencing Project?

  • Will you share my genetic data with third parties?

  • Do I need to provide a new saliva sample to 23andMe?

  • How will you protect the confidentiality of my data?

  • What is whole genome sequencing? How is this process different from genotyping, the process previously used by 23andMe to analyze the DNA in my saliva sample?

  • How do you select participants for this study?

  • Will I have access to my sequenced data?

  • What am I agreeing to if I accept the consent documents for this project?

Discovering DNA Communities – Ethnic Origins

A new study uses genetic data and genealogical research from more than 700,000 Ancestry.com <ancestry.com> customers to reveal migration trends in North America over the past 300 years. Findings, which were published in the journal Nature Communications <www.nature.com/article/ncomms14238>, are the basis of AncestryDNA’s Genetic Communities user experience.
According to an Ancestry,com announcement, the study shows “how specific groups of people are connected through their DNA, what places they called home, and which migration paths they followed to get there.” The results correspond strongly with documented history and the results of genetic data done by 23andMe, GPS DNA and Family Tree DNA.
Researchers first identified genetically related groups and smaller clusters within them. Then they used family trees associated with those similar DNA profiles to describe the geographic origins and migration patterns within each cluster. Of specific interest were communities that have develop distinguishable genetic patterns due to “gene flow barriers” such as isolated geographic locations or cultural identity that encourages mating within the community.
Unfortunately, there has not been a methodology research model to reasonably determine African-American and Native-American clusters based on the above mention. The DNA Communities does afford African-American and Native-Americans the opportunity to identify additional relationships based on the DNA Community findings.
If you are a member of FamilyDNA, GPS DNA or 23andMe you will find similar clusters and ethnic communities base on similar methods. The National Geographic Project (Geno 2) was the first and is still actively working to define their results. The only draw back for most is the cost which is over $200 to participate.

 

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