Gedmatch Autosomal DNA Segment Analyzer (ADSA)

Autosomal DNA Segment Analyzer (ADSA)
GEDMATCH Quick Start Guide

ICW means In-Common-With were ever used

To use GEDMATCH with ADSA you must be a Tier 1 GEDMATCH member. That means you must have, at some time, donated at least $10 to GEDMATCH. The GEDMATCH upload process for DNAgedcom.com depends on two Tier 1 tools: Matching Segment Search and Triangulation which you cannot access unless you are a Tier 1 member. And, of course, you must have loaded your raw data to GEDMATCH previously so that it has been tokenized and batch processing is completed.

Some other things to be aware of:

  • Certain fields that are available for Family Tree DNA kits are not presently available for GEDMATCH. These include:

    Match Date

    Predicted Relationship

    Known Relationship

    Relationship Range

    Haplogroups

    Surnames

    Total Shared cM

    Longest Block cM

    So, this means that using these for sorting, selection, highlighting or display purposes may not have the results you wanted because these fields are empty in a GEDMATCH kit.

  • To manage processing load on GEDMATCH’s servers, only the In-Common-With indicators for your top 400 matches are provided by GEDMATCH, so you will only have ICW bricks in the ADSA report for your longer segments. You can manually determine ICWs for other matches by doing a one-to-many report for one of your matches and comparing their list of matches to yours.

  • Generally, there are a lot more segments in a GEDMATCH ADSA report than for Family Tree DNA. This tends to slow down the responsiveness of your browser when viewing the ADSA report. You may wish to increase the minimum segment size in ADSA to 10 cM(Centimorgans)

  • The GEDMATCH tools that are used to gather the data for DNAgedcom exclude very close relatives (eg. siblings, parents, children) to improve processing performance, so you will not see them as matches on your ADSA report for GEDMATCH kits.

  • The X chromosome matches are not presently included in GEDMATCH kits.

To get started, follow these steps.

  1. If you haven’t already done so, go to www.DNAgedcom.com and click on “Register”:

  2. Register for a free account at DNAgedcom.com:

  3. Logon to DNAgedcom.com with your new username and password:

  4. Prepare to upload your GEDMATCH data to DNAgedcom.com:

    You will see a screen with a large, square text input box. Do not enter anything here yet.

  5. Leaving the window above open, create a new browser window or tab and go to the www.gedmatch.com and

    logon

    . Click on “Matching Segment Search” in the Tier 1 tools menu near the bottom of the screen:

  6. Enter your kit number and click “No” on the graphic bar (very important!) and click “Submit”:

  7. Now wait for the report to finish – it will probably take a few minutes. When it is complete it will look something like this:

    Select everything on the screen and copy it to the clipboard. In

    Windows

    you can do this using

    ctrl-a

    followed by ctrl-c. On a

    Mac

    you can use command-a and command-c. You may have to wait a little while for the copy to complete. There is a lot of data there to copy. (If you don’t wait long enough, when you paste the information into DNAgedcom you won’t get what you copied. You may see a

    hour-glass

    or spinning beach-ball while the copying is going on.

    Usually

    the copy process doesn’t take more than a minute or two.)

  8. Go to the browser window you have open to DNAgedcom.com. Click

    in

    the square box and paste what you copied into it. On

    Windows

    you can use Ctrl-v or you can use command-v on a Mac.You should see a portion of what you copied like this:

    Click the “Load” button. The load should complete in a few seconds.

  9. Click the Clear button to erase the text-input box again and return to your GEDMATCH browser window. Return to the main GEDMATCH menu again.

  10. Now click on the Triangulation tool.

  11. Enter your GEDMATCH kit number and select the middle radio button (very important!) and click on the “Triangulate” button:

  12. Wait for the report to complete. The Triangulation report may take longer than the Matching Segment Report depending on how many In-Common-With matches you have and the current load on GEDMATCH’s servers. When it finishes there will be 4 rows of asterisks on the screen and the screen will look something like this:

    Once again, select the entire page (ctrl-a or command-a) and copy it to the clipboard (ctrl-c or command-c). Wait for the copy to complete. Then switch back to your DNAgedcom browser window.

  13. Make sure the text-input box in DNAgedcom is empty (use the Clear button if you need to) and then paste the Triangulation report into the box with ctrl-v or command-v. Then click on the Load button.

  14. When the Load process completes the screen will refresh. You can now go to ADSA by selecting the Autosomal Tools menu and the Autosomal DNA Segment Analyzer option on that menu. Or you can go to this link: http://www.dnagedcom.com/adsa. You will see a screen like this:

  15. Select your kit from the drop-down menu. GEDMATCH kits will start with a letter (A=Ancestry, F=FTDNA, M=23andMe etc.):

  16. Click GET REPORT

  17. If you have Ashkenazi ancestry or are part of an endogamous (interrelated) group you may not be able to generate a report with the default input parameters. Please consult the Tips for People with Ashkenazi Ancestry page before clicking GET REPORT.

For more information about this process, how to interpret your results, or troubleshooting, read the full ADSA manual.

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Finding More DNA Cousins for Free

Finding More DNA Cousins for FREE

July 13, 2017

|

AdaEze Naja Chinyere Njoku

 

Hello Family!

We sure hope you all are doing well.  We know that many of you that have taken the autosomal DNA test at FTDNA.com 23andme.com , Ancestry.com or MyHeritage.com are waiting patiently for that breakthrough of finding an Africa DNA match.  

Some of us are not being so patient.  Logging into the accounts 7 to 10 times daily, yelling at folks because we can’t find that match.  Talking to ourselves AND responding..  Creeping up on your computer from the side, like agent 007….  Acting as if it is hiding that match from you.  It’s OK.  We’ve been there too.  Please read a book or go fishing or something Shuga.  More people are testing.  We have to be patient.  It took some of us over 7 YEARS to get an Africa DNA match.  Oh but when we did!!!! 

 

Now, we are not going to lie to you.  We all know that there is NO GUARANTEE that you will find an Africa DNA match.  Here are some ways to widen the net though.  These helpful options are steps that I have taken myself.  They have proven to be very helpful especially since many people have DNA tested at one company and have elected NOT to test at another.  

There is a place where your DNA raw data can go and meet up with other people’s DNA raw data that tested at different DNA testing companies.   You all can chillax for FREE!!  OK.. Let me clarify…. Its like a meet up for ya raw data.

The goal is to upload your DNA raw data to the websites that you have not tested or to the sites like Gedmatch.com to help you compare shared segments on Chromosomes between you and others that have also uploaded.

Read more: DNAtestedafricans.org

No One testing Company Can Provide Best Matches

No One testing Company Can Provide Best Matches

Nobody can predict which database is going to have your best matches because it is somewhat a matter of chance of who tests where. Not all of your relatives or potential relatives are going to test at the same company. Also, the algorithms (mathematical formula) is not the same for each testing company.

The big 3 companies at the moment are Ancestry.com, 23andMe, and FTDNA. In Europe, it is GPS and Living DNA. You can test with the later if you have European roots.

I would highly recommend uploading your data to the free site www.gedmatch.com which acts as a central site for intercompany compares. Since it is on a volunteer basis, it only has some of the results from each company, but it does tend to attract the most interested researchers, and therefore should have a good response rate if you attempt contact. You can upgrade to Tier 1 for advanced data manipulations for $10.00 per month.

Once you get uploaded, try the one-to-many lookup. You can see the original source of a contributor by the first letter of his kit code. (A=ancestry, M=23andme, T=FTDNA).

The Children of Adam – National Geographics

 

 

In the name of God, “The Most Gracious”, The Dispenser of Grace”

In the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, “the Lord, The Almighty, the Creator, the Maker, the Godhead

Jehovah, Yahweh, Catholic, Jew, Baptist, Methodist, Buddist and other religious groups

God is the Ruler of the Universe and creator of all life which began in Africa and spread around the world. God makes no distinction of religion, color, sexual orientation. He only and simply stated follow my teaching and I give you free will to choose me your Father or Satan.

This is a fact that lies within all of us in a special place in our DNA.

African is the beginning and the end, take your place with God.

When reviewing material for this article, I found so much hate and rejection of the scientifically validated facts. Challenges based on religious preferences without an open mind or understanding or wanting to seek validation. This is the position of some of the world today but it is changing. We are one and you are his people.

Coming soon, DNA spirituality, health, disease, relationships and mental health. I wrote a blog that came to my mind while flying to DC-Bal. So for five hours, I wrote the blog while deep in thought and prayer. It has nothing to do with Trump tweet today regarding North Korea.

I met a man in the Dollar Store today and I turn to him and I said I know you some how. He said to me I have been waiting for you. We talked a little about our father our God. He wrote down a book he wanted me to read, and we continue a discussion about our connection. Finally, he said we shall meet again and other will be coming to give you greetings. I asked his name and he just smiled. He said I know your name. As he said to me, “there is no burden too heavy or hard to that you can not bear the burden if you believe in God. This is the third experience since my transition and return to this life.

May our God bless you all and keep you safe.

.

Centimorgans in Genetic Geealogy

Reprinted from the International Society of Genetic Genealogy August 2, 2017. No adjustment was made to this article and is the ISOGG position.

 

In genetic genealogy, a centiMorgan (cM) or map unit (m.u.) is a unit of recombinant frequency which is used to measure genetic distance. It is often used to imply distance along a chromosome, and takes into account how often recombination occurs in a region. A region with few cMs undergoes relatively less recombination. The number of base pairs to which it corresponds varies widely across the genome (different regions of a chromosome have different propensities towards crossover). One centiMorgan corresponds to about 1 million base pairs in humans on average. The centiMorgan is equal to a 1% chance that a marker at one genetic locus on a chromosome will be separated from a marker at a second locus due to crossing over in a single generation.

The genetic genealogy testing companies 23andMeAncestryDNAFamily Tree DNA and MyHeritage DNA use centiMorgans to denote the size of matching DNA segments in autosomal DNA tests. Segments which share a large number of centiMorgans in common are more likely to be of significance and to indicate a common ancestor within a genealogical timeframe.

The centiMorgan was named in honor of geneticist Thomas Hunt Morgan by his student Alfred Henry Sturtevant. Note that the parent unit of the centiMorgan, the Morgan, is rarely used today.

23andMe and Family Tree DNA both use HapMap to infer their centiMorgans.

centiMorgans vs megabases

CentiMorgans are interpolated numbers that take into consideration each area of a chromosome and its propensity to recombine. This means if two cousins share 40 cM on chromosome 1, and two different cousins share 40 cM on chromosome 5, they both can be predicted to share a certain degree of relationship statistically. Megabases vary slightly in different locations so that in the same scenario, if both sets shared 40 Mb pairs, it would be more difficult to ensure they are of a similar degree of relation without further accounting for location, chromosome and other factors.[1]

Ann Turner provides a useful explanation: “I think of the cM as being a unit of ‘effective’ distance. As an analogy, a mile is a fixed quantity (5280 feet), and so are megabases. But the probability that a person can walk a mile in 20 minutes is more fluid. If the terrain is very rough, the “effective” distance of a literal mile might be more like two miles if you’re trying to arrive at a certain time. We’re more interested in the probability that a segment will be passed on intact than the size of the segment in Mb”.[2]

As the cM is an empirical measure, based on recombination events in a particular dataset of parents and offspring, it can vary somewhat from study to study. This set of maps for each chromosome shows that the general shape of the centiMorgan vs megabase curve is similar for two datasets, but the absolute values are not quite the same:

http://web.archive.org/web/20070113005025/http://compgen.rutgers.edu/maps/compare.pdf

cm values per chromosome

The following table compares cM values per chromosome at Family Tree DNAGEDmatch, and 23andMeAncestryDNA uses 3475 as the total cM according to the help screen for confidence level in a DNA match. This presumably excludes the X chromosome.

CM chromosome FTDNA&GEDMatch&23andMe.jpg

Probability of crossover

The following chart shows the estimated probability that a segment will be affected by a crossover. The chart does not take into account some variables such as inversions and different recombination rates for males and females.

Crossover probability centiMorgans.png

Converting centiMorgans into percentages

In order to get an approximate percentage of shared DNA from a Family Tree DNA Family Finder test, take all of the segments above 5 cM, add them together and then divide by 68.

The way the calculation works is that your total genome in cMs with the Family Finder test is 6770 cM. A half-identical match (such as a parent/child) is 3385 cM. This number has to be doubled to represent both the maternal and paternal sides giving a total of 6770 cM. Matt Dexter explains: “The reason the number is not 6770 or 6800, but rather 68, is that it saves an additional step doing the math to convert an answer to percent. For example, 3385 / 6770 = .5 then as a second step, .5 times 100 = 50%. Using 68 to start with saves the added math step. So (3385 / 6800) * 100 is the same thing as 3385 / 68, which results in = 50%.”[3]

Human reference genome

The centiMorgan totals per chromosome are based on the Human Reference Genome. 23andMe and Ancestry DNA use Build 37. Family Tree DNA use Build 37 for matching but Build 36 for segment boundaries in the Chromosome Browser. Raw data files are provided in both formats. Build 37 filled in quite a few gaps, and the number of base pairs in each of the chromosomes was longer in Build 37 as compared to Build 36. Consequently the cM totals per chromosome are lower for Family Finder than they are for 23andMe. GedMatch use Build 36, and convert AncestryDNA and 23andMe data from Build 37 to Build 36 for backward compatibility.

The latest version of the Human Reference Genome, Build 38, was released in December 2013. However, none of the companies have as yet adopted Build 38 and there is a “gentleman’s agreement” in place to stick with Build 37 for the present time.

Further reading

Resources

Do You Know Who You Are? Do You Know Your Ancestors?

 

DNA

Those of us who had ancestors living in slavery in South Carolina Low Country, North Carolina and Georgia were likely from Senegal and Sierra-Leone. Do you know who you are, did you have ancestors on a plantation in these areas particularly?  A slave who could manage escape did not go north but to Florida  Seminole territory.

What pulled me in this direction was the multitude of matches from Brazil, Mexico, Iran, Syria and the Caribbean. I started to see names such as Sadi, Jahid, Fahid, Dajzar, and Raza.

Wrong or right, the surnames we are using are not our own. They bind us to the earth as a human being. Looking beyond that our ancestor used a different name. So when I see the strange names I want to dig for more. DNA has given us the opportunity to see the world internationally not narrowly focused.

The picture below is of Abraham, a Black Seminole Leader in the Second Seminole War.

 

Genetic Inheritance Follows Rules Concept 5

 

Ref: DNA for beginners.org, access Aug 1, 2017

When Mendel proposed that each trait is determined by a pair of genes, it presented a potential problem. If parents pass on both copies of a gene pair, then offspring would end up with four genes for each trait. Mendel deduced that sex cells — sperm and eggs — contain only one parental gene of each pair. The half-sets of genes contributed by sperm and egg restore a whole set of genes in the offspring.

Mendel found that different gene combinations from the parents resulted in specific ratios of dominant-to-recessive traits. The results of a cross between two hybrid parents — each carrying one dominant and one recessive gene — were key to his synthesis. For example, a cross between two yellow-seed hybrids produces three times as many yellow seeds as green seeds. This is Mendel’s famous 3 to 1 ratio.

23andMe Cleared to Provide Health Reports

Pharmaceutical Companies are not liking this at all.

Purchasers of 23andMe (http://www.23andMe.com) Health + Ancestry DNA test now have access to genetic health risk reports for conditions including late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson disease, Celiac disease and seven others.

This is a big step, if incremental, step forward for the company. Its DNA service initially provided ancestry information and genetic risk reports on about 250 conditions. In 2013, the FDA ordered 23andMe to stop providing health-related information to US customers because the company hadn’t proven its test were analytically or clinically validated.

The new reports calculate genetic risk based on the presence (or absence) of specific markers in a person’s DNA. To obtain FDA authorization for them, 23andMe conducted “extensive validation studies for accuracy and user comprehensive that met FDA standards,” according to its announcement. FDA considered evidence tying each condition with relevant genetic markers in customers’ DNA.

Take a look at the new 23andMe reports at (http://www.blog.23andme.com/health-traits/learn-23andme-new-genetic-health-risk-reports)

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