Assistant Professor of African-American History – Georgia Southern Univeristy

New Position in African-American History at
Georgia Southern University

Assistant Professor of African-American History—Search #67479
College of Arts and Humanities/Department of History

The Department of History in the College of Arts and Humanities invites applications and nominations for the position of Assistant Professor of African-American History. This position will be located on the Statesboro campus.

In January 2017, the University System of Georgia Board of Regents voted to consolidate Armstrong State University and Georgia Southern University. The new, 27,000-student university will be named Georgia Southern University with campuses in Savannah, Statesboro, and Hinesville. The expected timeline for the first entering class will be fall 2018. Complete details are available at http://consolidation.georgiasouthern.edu/.

Within this setting, the Department of History offers Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts degrees in history and a graduate certificate in Public History. The department has 38 faculty members with diverse fields of expertise. The average upper-division class size is 25 students, ensuring that students receive one-on-one attention and develop strong working relationships with faculty. The Assistant Professor of African-American History will contribute to the Department’s mission of teaching, research, and service in the classroom, the community, and the profession.

Position Description. Reporting to the department chair, the Assistant Professor of African-American History requires teaching, advisement, research, and service responsibilities. The successful candidate will regularly teach core courses in the history of the United States required of all Georgia Southern University students, courses required for the major, and a variety of upper-division courses in his or her field. In addition to pursuing an active research agenda, the successful candidate is expected to advise students and contribute to departmental governance. The position is an academic 10 month, tenure-track appointment, and the salary is competitive and commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Required Qualifications:
• Earned PhD in History with specialty in African-American history by August 1, 2018
• Ability to teach courses in African-American history in different chronological eras
• Ability to teach survey courses in the history of the United States, the undergraduate historical methods course, senior seminar, and graduate seminars
• Must be authorized to work in the United States for the duration of employment without assistance from the institution

Preferred Qualifications:
• College or university teaching experience (part-time experience is permissible)

Screening of applications begins January 19, 2018, and continues until the position is filled. The preferred position starting date is August 1, 2018. A complete application consists of a letter addressing the qualifications cited above; a curriculum vitae; an article-length writing sample, and three professional letters of recommendation. Other documentation may be requested. Only complete applications and applications submitted electronically will be considered. Finalists will be required to submit to a background investigation. Applications and nominations should be sent to:
Dr. Jonathan Bryant, Search Chair, Search #67479
Department of History
Georgia Southern University
P. O. Box 8054
Statesboro GA 30460-8054
Electronic mail: history@georgiasouthern.edu
Telephone: 912-478-4478

More information about the institution is available through http://www.georgiasouthern.edu Georgia Southern University seeks to recruit individuals who are committed to working in diverse academic and professional communities and who are committed to excellence in teaching, scholarship, and professional service within the University and beyond. The names of applicants and nominees, vitae, and other non-evaluative information may be subject to public inspection under the Georgia Open Records Act. Georgia Southern University is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity institution. Individuals who need reasonable accommodations under the ADA to participate in the search process should contact the Vice Provost.

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Red River Sankofa Historical Society

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What is Sankofa?

A symbol of understanding the past to plan for the future. (literal meaning: go back to fetch it)

Sankofa is part of traditional Akan wisdom and represents a cultural link between the living and the dead, the past and present and the present linked to the future. A bird looking backward so that its beak points to his tail represents Sankofa.

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About Red River Sankofa Historical Society

Red River Sankofa Historical Society seeks to enhance and promote awareness of the accomplishments and contributions of people of African descent as organic and essential components of larger communities within Northwest Louisiana & Northeast Texas. Red River Sankofa Historical Society will emphasize contributions to the cultural and historical landscape in this region by promoting scholarly research, providing resources for historical and genealogical studies, creating networks of individuals with similar interests, preserving African American burial grounds and assisting communities in these areas with documenting their histories. Red River Sankofa Historical Society will basically function as a non-profit historical data repository gathering and disseminating information related to Northwest Louisiana, organize cemetery restoration projects, raise funds, and coordinate with other organization with similar goals. We want to increase the awareness and historic value of these resting grounds and the historical context attached to them as a source of community pride. The goal is to encourage groups and individuals to help preserve these places as landmarks for future generations to appreciate. If you would like to contribute, please feel free to contact us at: info@redriversankofahs.org

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Tracing Your African Roots

The Sokko: exploring ethnic possibilities. Roots the Dutch version *** Op zoek naar Afrikaanse roots via DNA & genealogisch en historisch onderzoek.

via ROOTS.NL (S1E2) – Searching for Gold — Tracing African Roots

IRISH SLAVE TRADE LONG AGO BUT NOT FORFOTTEN (DNA)

I finally decided to post this article after some research and review of my DNA. I am a mixture of European ancestry. To be specific my ancestor DNA indicate Ireland and Wales as home to many of my ancestor.Forced to the Caribbean, South America, and the United States as slaves. Many who want to use the term indentured servant, not quite the case. There are many records of Virginia colonial townships and counties that sold white women who were slaves or indentured servants for having children with Africans without permission of their masters, along with their children by the courts to compensate the owners. Most of these slaves ended up in the Low Country of South Carolina on rice or indigo plantations.  See Westmoreland County Court Records in colonial times for examples.

The next time you see an Irish or person from Wales, you may be looking at a cousin. I think it will help to build bridges and bring understanding, not to divide us.

IRISH SLAVE TRADE – THE FORGOTTEN “WHITE” SLAVES

They came as slaves; vast human cargo transported on tall British ships bound for the Americas. They were shipped by the hundreds of thousands and included men, women, and even the youngest of children.

Whenever they rebelled or even disobeyed an order, they were punished in the harshest ways. Slave owners would hang their human property by their hands and set their hands or feet on fire as one form of punishment. They were burned alive and had their heads placed on pikes in the marketplace as a warning to other captives.

We don’t really need to go through all of the gory details, do we? We know all too well the atrocities of the African slave trade.

But, are we talking about African slavery? King James II and Charles I also led a continued effort to enslave the Irish. Britain’s famed Oliver Cromwell furthered this practice of dehumanizing one’s next door neighbor.

The Irish slave trade began when 30,000 Irish prisoners were sold as slaves to the New World. King James I Proclamation of 1625 required Irish political prisoners be sent overseas and sold to English settlers in the West Indies. By the mid-1600s, the Irish were the main slaves sold to Antigua and Montserrat. At that time, 70% of the total population of Montserrat were Irish slaves.

Ireland quickly became the biggest source of human livestock for English merchants. The majority of the early slaves to the New World were actually white.

From 1641 to 1652, over 500,000 Irish were killed by the English and another 300,000 were sold as slaves. Ireland’s population fell from about 1,500,000 to 600,000 in one single decade. Families were ripped apart as the British did not allow Irish dads to take their wives and children with them across the Atlantic. This led to a helpless population of homeless women and children. Britain’s solution was to auction them off as well.

During the 1650s, over 100,000 Irish children between the ages of 10 and 14 were taken from their parents and sold as slaves in the West Indies, Virginia, and New England. In this decade, 52,000 Irish (mostly women and children) were sold to Barbados and Virginia. Another 30,000 Irish men and women were also transported and sold to the highest bidder. In 1656, Cromwell ordered that 2000 Irish children be taken to Jamaica and sold as slaves to English settlers.

Many people today will avoid calling the Irish slaves what they truly were: Slaves. They’ll come up with terms like “Indentured Servants” to describe what occurred to the Irish. However, in most cases from the 17th and 18th centuries, Irish slaves were nothing more than human cattle.

As an example, the African slave trade was just beginning during this same period. It is well recorded that African slaves, not tainted with the stain of the hated Catholic theology and more expensive to purchase, were often treated far better than their Irish counterparts.

African slaves were very expensive during the late 1600s (50 Sterling). Irish slaves came cheap (no more than 5 Sterling). If a planter whipped or branded or beat an Irish slave to death, it was never a crime. A death was a monetary setback, but far cheaper than killing a more expensive African. The English masters quickly began breeding the Irish women for both their own personal pleasure and for greater profit. Children of slaves were themselves slaves, which increased the size of the master’s free workforce. Even if an Irish woman somehow obtained her freedom, her kids would remain slaves of her master. Thus, Irish moms, even with this new found emancipation, would seldom abandon their kids and would remain in servitude.

In time, the English thought of a better way to use these women (in many cases, girls as young as 12) to increase their market share: The settlers began to breed Irish women and girls with African men to produce slaves with a distinct complexion. These new “mulatto” slaves brought a higher price than Irish livestock and, likewise, enabled the settlers to save money rather than purchase new African slaves. This practice of interbreeding Irish females with African men went on for several decades and was so widespread that, in 1681, legislation was passed “forbidding the practice of mating Irish slave women to African slave men for the purpose of producing slaves for sale.” In short, it was stopped only because it interfered with the profits of a large slave transport company.

England continued to ship tens of thousands of Irish slaves for more than a century. Records state that, after the 1798 Irish Rebellion, thousands of Irish slaves were sold to both America and Australia. There were horrible abuses of both African and Irish captives. One British ship even dumped 1,302 slaves into the Atlantic Ocean so that the crew would have plenty of food to eat.

There is little question that the Irish experienced the horrors of slavery as much (if not more in the 17th Century) as the Africans did. There is, also, very little question that those brown, tanned faces you witness in your travels to the West Indies are very likely a combination of African and Irish ancestry. In 1839, Britain finally decided on its own to end its participation in Satan’s highway to hell and stopped transporting slaves. While their decision did not stop pirates from doing what they desired, the new law slowly concluded THIS chapter of nightmarish Irish misery.

But, if anyone, black or white, believes that slavery was only an African experience, then they’ve got it completely wrong.

Irish slavery is a subject worth remembering, not erasing from our memories.

But, where are our public (and PRIVATE) schools???? Where are the history books? Why is it so seldom discussed?

Do the memories of hundreds of thousands of Irish victims merit more than a mention from an unknown writer?

Or is their story to be one that their English pirates intended: To (unlike the African book) have the Irish story utterly and completely disappear as if it never happened.

None of the Irish victims ever made it back to their homeland to describe their ordeal. These are the lost slaves; the ones that time and biased history books conveniently forgot.


Help Drive Research Forward for African Americans

23andMe Post

We believe genetics and the study of disease should be for everyone.
All ethnicities. All people.

Help drive research forward for African Americans.

Join now!

Questions: contact study-help@23andMe.com

Why your help is so important.

Less than 5% of research on the genetics of disease includes people of African ancestry. If people with diverse ancestries continue to be underrepresented in genetics research, then we risk missing key medical and other scientific discoveries that could benefit everyone.

If you participate in the African American Sequencing Project, you could help address this disparity. By sharing your genetic data with the scientific community, you can shape the future of genetics research to include people of African descent.

Only a fraction of genetic research studies have included people of African descent.

Popejoy, A. B. & Fullerton, S. M. Nature 538, 161-164 (2016).

See if you’re eligible

To be eligible for this study you must be a 23andMe customer, have consented to 23andMe Research, self identify as African or African American and be at least 18 years old.

How it works

You do not need to provide a new saliva sample — we will use the one you already sent us.

There is no cost to participate.

You consent to share your genetic data.

Enroll and agree to share your de-identified genetic information with researchers approved by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and qualified research partners of 23andMe.

None of your contact information or answers to 23andMe surveys will be shared.

We will sequence your genome.

If you are selected, we will send your saliva sample, already provided to 23andMe, to a lab for whole genome sequencing. Whole genome sequencing is a more thorough but also more costly review of your genome than that provided by the genotyping analysis used to generate your 23andMe reports. *This is extremely important. The real cost to an individual is about $1200 with most labs. Entire genome sequencing means all of your DNA in your body. I am a member of the Ethnicity Research Group studying and identify the location specific location of African and African-American ancestors and I also participate in the L2 study group, this later group requires identification with a person of African origin. right now these two groups are closed.

For more information on sequencing versus genotyping watch this video or read this article.

We will provide data to researchers around the world.

23andMe will share this sequenced genetic data with researchers by depositing it into a scientific database approved by the NIH. Approved researchers will have access to this data to conduct genetics research.

About this project

In October 2016, 23andMe was awarded a grant by the National Human Genome Research Institute, a major research arm of the National Institutes of Health, to fund the African American Sequencing Project.

This project is part of our broad commitment to diversity in genetics research. Learn more about 23andMe’s Roots into the Future Project.

Privacy and Security

We do not share your genetic information without your explicit authorization. Only you can decide if you would like to participate in this project by authorizing 23andMe to share your information with outside researchers.

Even though you previously consented to participate in 23andMe Research, you will need to read and accept additional consents to participate in this study.

Hi. Have additional questions about the African American Sequencing Project?

If you don’t see your question here, get in touch with us.

  • What does it mean to be a research participant in this project?

  • Why is 23andMe conducting the African American Sequencing Project?

  • Will you share my genetic data with third parties?

  • Do I need to provide a new saliva sample to 23andMe?

  • How will you protect the confidentiality of my data?

  • What is whole genome sequencing? How is this process different from genotyping, the process previously used by 23andMe to analyze the DNA in my saliva sample?

  • How do you select participants for this study?

  • Will I have access to my sequenced data?

  • What am I agreeing to if I accept the consent documents for this project?

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