Family Search Partners with Social Media App Famicity

Access Sept 25, 2017: http://media.familysearch.org/familysearch-partners-with-social-media-app-famicity
September
21,
2017
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05:00 PM
Europe/Amsterdam

FamilySearch Partners with Social Media App Famicity

FamilySearch announced France-based Famicity.com as its newest partner. Famicity is a free and fun social media app (IOS and Android) and website that offers family members a private social network based on a family tree to collaboratively tell and preserve their family story and capture the stories of children as family life happens and evolves.  New users just need to go to Famicity.com to get started for free.

Famicity is an intuitive, app-based tool. It is simple to use, and encourages more communication between family members. Stories, photos, and videos are easily added and conveniently time stamped. It also allows users to give other family members permission to add to a story.

Today, families are spread out geographically and lean heavily on technology like social media to communicate and share family moments. Websites like Facebook aim to bring families closer together; however, these websites can be overwhelming and lack family focus with all the content being posted by a growing subscription of friends. Famicity is private and allows invited family members to focus on sharing and preserving family-focused content.

Created from the beginning as a social media platform, “Famicity understands the needs of FamilySearch.org users and that’s why we’ve reinvented social media for each and every member of a family to bond, grow, and celebrate their lives privately and securely,” said Famicity co-founder Guillaume Languereau. “Famicity members can already create their family tree on their own. This partnership makes it even easier for FamilySearch members to sign up with their account and automatically upload their family tree into Famicity to start an online family reunion in private.”

Personal control of one’s story is important to Famicity. No account holder has access to anyone else’s information, and the user can block others if the need arises.

Famicity offers easy-to-use features:

  • Home—shared family news and photo albums
  • Story—personal space for stories and albums
  • Tree—a family tree in which relatives collaborate
  • Inbox—an option for family-focused communications
  • My Family—shareable lists and contact information for family members

“Famicity is an ad free, user friendly, and safe family social media product for sharing family moments, emotions, and memories,” said FamilySearch’s partner marketing manager, Courtney Connolly.

Connolly explained that for current FamilySearch users, Famicity can read and automatically upload relevant data from their FamilySearch Family Tree. Plans are underway for a future Famicity release that will allow users to sync information between a user’s Famicity and FamilySearch Accounts.

To get started, users need to create a free account at Famicity.com. For FamilySearch accountholders, there will be instructions how to upload their FamilySearch information to their new Famicity account.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

About Famicity

Famicity is a social network platform that allows you to share cherished family memories simply and privately, with all your relatives. It’s a living record of your family at your fingertips, without compromising your family’s privacy and confidentiality, and families everywhere are eager to fund it. With Famicity you can write, share, organize and preserve the legacy of your extended family.

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New GEDmatch Genesis Beta

 
 

 

GEDmatch Genesis

GEDmatch Genesis is a peek at things to come for GEDmatch. It provides two things:

    • Ability to accept uploads from testing companies with formats and SNP sets not compatible with the current main GEDmatch database.
  • A new comparison algorithm that we believe will provide better accuracy, and more flexibility. More info: The Genesis Algorithm

During this initial deployment, the GEDmatch Genesis database will be separate from the main GEDmatch database, and comparisons for one will not show entries made in the other. Eventually, the 2 databases will be merged, and results will include entries from both. Likewise, the benefits of the Genesis comparison algorithm will eventually become available to all GEDmatch users.

The initial offering of Genesis applications will be limited to autosomal DNA matches. That too will be expanded as we move forward in our effort to convert existing GEDmatch software to the new algorithm.

We hope you find this transition to GEDmatch Genesis useful.

 

 

 

The Genesis Algorithm

For several years, GEDmatch has provided genetic genealogists, both beginners and experts, the ability to search for matches among kits in their database without regard to vendor. Also, GEDmatch has provided a rich suite of analysis programs allowing users to dig deeply into the genetic details of their matches, enhance the reports from their vendors, and even pursue their own original research ideas. Our algorithms are evolving to extract the most trustworthy and meaningful matching information possible using the markers common to pairs of kits even though sometimes limited.

Unfortunately, all too often, kits appear to share a DNA segment purely by chance. To combat this confusing phenomenon, we recently have developed a reliability measure that allows users to assess the quality of a matching segment in an intuitively appealing fashion. We also use the measure to guide our matching algorithms as they wring the greatest amount of useful information possible from the markers common to pairs of kits.

If we could assume that marker characteristics were uniform in all regions within chromosomes, we could use a “one size fits all” requirement for matching segments as is sometimes done. Unfortunately, the relevant characteristics vary widely. Some long segments with few markers may be accidental matches. Some marker rich short segments are often discarded although they are profoundly non-random.

Using the characteristics of each and every marker in a segment, we compute the expected number of purely chance matches to it to be found in the database. That number is then used to classify the segment into one of several levels reflecting the likelihood that the random matches may overwhelm the real ones. When a user executes a one-to-many search or a one-to-one comparison specifying a minimum segment length, the display can then include an estimate of validity for each segment found.

One can assume those segments designated to be valid are the result of a DNA inheritance process rather than mere chance. Questions may still remain about how far back shared DNA originates, but a confounding factor has been removed.

sources:

https://genesis.gedmatch.com/select.php

https://genesis.gedmatch.com/Qblurb.html

 

Journey From Igboland to South Carolina

 

 

 Resource for further information: “The Voyage of the Slave Ship Hare”

I read This article four times to get a feeling for the author and the story. I realized I had transcended home to Igbo land.

Resource: Access August 9, 2017 – https://www.dnatestedafricans.org/single-post/2017/06/18/The-Invisible-Artifact-Something-Amazing-Happened

The Invisible Artifact ~ A Journey From Igboland to South Carolina

April 16, 2017

|

AdaaEze Naja Chinyere Njoku

A Dibia (native healer) in Igboland was awakened from a very disturbing dream. The gods were giving him a message. He went to the Eze (king) and informed him. The Eze told him to go and do what he was directed. He returned to the shrine after gathering wood from the sacred Iroko tree. He personally carved a mysterious artifact, creating a secret compartment at the bottom where he placed inside, a kola nut, alligator pepper , and a message.

 


Meanwhile, the Eze summonsed the town crier to have every elder male and elder female of each family to meet him at his palace immediately. They each arrived wondering why they were assembled at such a later hour. The Dibia returned with the artifact and explained that the gods told him of an impending danger.


He said that a tomb will float on the great water, bringing a choking white fog.
The fog would engulf many of the village people but some will survive. He advised
that when this horrible white smoke came, to run to a place near the evil forest
where they would be invisible to the naked eye. A great fear came over the
villagers because no one went near the evil forest unless they were cast out of the
village. It was an abomination.

The elders all began to speak at the same time.


The clanking sound of the Dibia’s staff striking the ground, caused a silence to
roll across the tongues of each person there. His eyes turned a hazy white as he
went into a trance. He said, “Out of this abomination, our people will return”. He
directed each elder to come to the artifact. He recited an incantation and told
each elder to touch a different area of it. When they touched it, that area displayed
a mystical glowing symbol that was not carved into the artifact.

It sealed their DNA into the symbols.

The Dibia explained that the mystical symbols would only glow when a descendant of the elder that touched it was near.


When the last elder touched the artifact, a second seal was placed upon it and another artifact, an exact duplicate appeared out of a puff of red smoke. They were all amazed. He kept the second artifact with him. It could only be passed from Dibia to his successor, until the time of reckoning.


The Dibia called the strongest man in the group. His name was Obinna (Obi). He was noticeable because of the bright spiritual glow about him that only he could see.
 

The guards were given instructions to hold him, regardless to what happened
next. They did. The Dibia placed a green herb in his mouth and pushed the
artifact into his chest. It started to burn his skin as he screamed in uncontrollable
pain. His skin divided and the artifact went inside of him. Then the pain was
gone as if nothing happened. Eze assigned him warriors to guard him day and
night. They were all sworn to secrecy to NEVER reveal what took place that night.

 

About 7 years later, the dreaded tomb came floating on the great water. The white
fog rolled all around it. Many were taken away in the fog while some made it
safely to the meeting place. A mother screamed in the darkness. She was unable
to find her son Obi. He was the one that the Dibia chose to hold the sacred
artifact inside of him.


 

Three Months on the Great Wata
 


The white fog took him and many others to a foreign land. Obinna (Obi) and those that
were with him in that dreadful tomb were placed on a block and sold into slavery.
Obi lived to be 97 years old. He had many children and grandchildren. They called him Papa Obi. They all remembered the stories he told of how he was brought to this place when the white fog came to his homeland. He told them of how he found that some of his age mates decided that they would rather drown themselves than to be enslaved. He even tried himself but the water would not take him. The artifact inside of him caused the water to push him back to the
surface and back away.


His children loved his stories and decided to research this place that seemed almost mythical. They found that it is now called Nigeria. Some call it Naija.  He always said he could still hear his mother’s voice from back home, guiding him, even until the day he died. His body was laid to rest in a beautiful wooden coffin at the foot of a huge tree, in a place now called South Carolina. His tombstone read ” Here lies Obinna, also known as Papa Obi, born 1724 in Nigeria; died 1821 in SC”.

Each year this amazing tree grows closer to its roots and has several knots and bends in it. There is no other tree like it in the whole land.  Some folks call it an angel oak tree.  Others call it a Spirit tree.  There has always been something different about that tree.

 


275 years later, in Nigeria….2016

A Dibia is awakened from a dream. He performed an incantation and retrieved
the artifact. He took it to the Eze and explained its history. The elders of each
family were called to witness the extraction of the message and the Kola nut. The
message read ““Out of this Obama Nation, our people will return. Obi is Ibo, SC”.
It was a peculiar message.


Several scholars, at the University, were called to try to decipher its meaning. It
was baffling. A Nigerian private investigator, named Emeka, was also contacted.
He was preferred because he was aware of the modern day technology as well as
the ancient customs of his people.


When Emeka was taken to see the artifact, one of the symbols glowed. It was a
tree with the letters SC at the bottom of the tree. He found that Obinna and he
shared the same ancestor. They were family! This investigation became a
personal journey. His family was taken by the white fog. Many questions
consumed him. Where are they now? What happened to them? Emeka had to
know.

His Journey to South Carolina began …

Read more by clicking on the link: https://www.dnatestedafricans.org/single-post/2017/06/18/The-Invisible-Artifact-Something-Amazing-Happened
 

Atlantic Slave Trade Genealogy

 

In order to help you find your DNA cousin’s, you need to understand the history of American slavery and culture today and an understanding of the East Coast of Africa. How to map your identity to a time in place. I am Igbo of a community long ago in African in Senegal with DNA links to Nigeria and Benin. Our Ancestors practiced the Islamic faith. We were forced to abandon our beliefs and accept Christianity by Protestants, Catholics, Methodist, Episcopal and the Church of England.
GenealogyBank Blog: Access August 21, 2017: https://blog,genealogybank.com/african-American-slave-trade-ships-records-for-genealogy.html

 

African American Slave Trade: Ships & Records for Genealogy
By Gena Philibert-Ortega March 3, 2014
Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this guest blog post, Gena searches old newspapers and other online resources to learn more about the African slave trade in America.

Throughout the course of the Atlantic Slave Trade, an estimated 12 million Africans were captured in their homeland and forcibly shipped across the Atlantic, on more than 35,000 voyages, starting in the 17th century* The African Diaspora scattered Africans throughout the Caribbean and Americas. The first slave ship to land in Colonial America went to Jamestown, Virginia, in August 1619. The name of the first African slave ship out of the United States was Desire, which sailed out of Massachusetts eighteen years later. This forced migration caused the displacement, torture, enslavement, and murder of many Africans.**

African slaves brought to the Americas were part of the “Middle Passage,” a voyage that began in Europe, stopped in Africa to unload supplies and pick up enslaved human cargo, and then traveled to American ports on the eastern coast to trade that human cargo for goods that were then shipped back to Europe.
History of the African Slave Trade in Early America and the United States Infographic (Note: the article continues after this infographic.)
History of the African Slave Trade in America
This troubling part of American history—and important part of African American history—can be uncovered and explored with patient historical research, including searching in old newspapers such as GenealogyBank’s online Historical Newspaper Archives.
Laws Slow—but Don’t Stop—the African Slave Trade
It would seem that the African slave trade to America would have been stopped by a law passed by the U.S. Congress in March 1807 that stated:
“That from and after the first day of January, one thousand eight hundred and eight, it shall not be lawful to import or bring into the United States or the territories thereof from any foreign kingdom, place, or country, any negro, mulatto, or person of colour, with intent to hold, sell, or dispose of such negro, mulatto, or person of colour, as a slave, or to be held to service or labour.”***
Genealogy Tip:
Read more about U.S. legislation in the 1800s regarding slavery in GenealogyBank’s Historical Documents section which contains The American State Papers and more.
However, the Act to Prohibit the Importation of Slaves and a similar law passed in the United Kingdom didn’t end the practice of the slave trade. Slave ships illegally continued to bring their human cargo to U.S. ports, and American newspapers continued reporting on the occasional capture of a slave ship into the 1840s. (Two ships, the Wanderer and the Clotilde, are reported to have brought slaves to the United States well into the 1850s.) As with the passage of most laws, those who would break the law don’t end their criminal deeds; instead, a black market thrives.
Slave Advertisements in Newspapers
Eighteenth-century newspapers found in GenealogyBank’s archives report of the comings and goings of slave ships when the African slave trade was still legal. From advertisements to shipping news articles, researchers can find mentions of slave ships names, their captains, and descriptions of the people on board.
In some cases, advertisements for the upcoming sale of slaves included information on the ship they would be arriving on. In this example from a 1785 South Carolina newspaper, Fisher & Edwards advertise that the ship Commerce, under Captain Thomas Morton, will be arriving from Africa’s Gold Coast with “upwards of 200 prime slaves” for sale.
ad for a slave auction, South-Carolina Weekly Gazette newspaper advertisement 6 August 1785
South-Carolina Weekly Gazette (Charleston, South Carolina), 6 August 1785, page 3
An earlier South Carolina advertisement proclaims that the slaves aboard Captain Buncombe’s ship Venus are “mostly stout men.”
ad for a slave auction, South-Carolina Weekly Gazette newspaper advertisement 17 July 1784
South-Carolina Weekly Gazette (Charleston, South Carolina), 17 July 1784, page 4
Slave Ship “Shipping News” in Newspapers
Articles under “Shipping News” or “Marine List” headlines are a good place to start searching for information about slave ships, crew, and cargo.
In this example from a 1799 New York newspaper, we see updates on various ships including information about deaths on ships. We also see that the Gurbridge and Mary were bringing slaves, and to whom they were being brought.
shipping news, Commercial Advertiser newspaper article 31 July 1799
Commercial Advertiser (New York, New York), 31 July 1799, page 3
Where to Find African Slave Trade & Slave Ship Records
After exhausting your research in newspapers, learn more about a particular slave ship by consulting the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database website, which houses information about slave ships from 1514 to 1866.
In some cases, digital collections may hold slave ship manifests, such as this example from the Metropolitan New York Library Council Digital Collections.
Don’t forget to look for finding aids like this one from the New York Historical Society’s Guide to the Slavery Collection 1709-1899.
The National Archives (NARA) houses resources that can assist in your research:
The Slave Manifests of Coastwise Vessels Filed at New Orleans, Louisiana, 1807-1860 website has “manifests filed with the collector of customs at New Orleans, Louisiana, of slaves transported in coastwise trade to or from New Orleans during the period 1807-1860.”
The Slave Manifests for the Port of Philadelphia, 08/1800-04/1860 website is from the same Record Group as the above manifests, Record Group 36: Records of the U.S. Customs Service, 1745-1997.
African American Slave Trade Infographic Research Sources:
http://www.africanamericancharleston.com/lowcountry.html
http://www.civilwar.org/education/history/civil-war-overview/slavery.html
http://www.dcte.udel.edu/hlp2/resources/slavery/slaves-US-1790-1860.pdf
http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/slavery/videos/origins-of-slavery
http://history1800s.about.com/od/slaveryinamerica/a/1807slaveact.htm
http://jacksonville.com/tu-online/stories/120201/met_7970180.html
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2005696251/
http://www.nps.gov/jame/historyculture/the-Royal-African-Company-supplying-slaves-to-jamestown.htm
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/history/on-african-american-migrations/
http://terrain.org/2012/columns/desires-past/
http://www.tennessee.gov/tsla/exhibits/blackhistory/aahtimelin.htm
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/09/02/AR2006090201097.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1688_Germantown_Quaker_Petition_Against_Slavery
http://www.yale.edu/glc/aces/germantown.htm

These online websites can be helpful, but research on the name of a slave ship should begin with historical newspapers. It’s in their advertisements and news articles that you will find mentions of the slave ships’ cargo, crew, and destination.
You are free to share the History of the African Slave Trade in Early America and the United States Infographic on your blog or website using the embed code below.
__________________
* The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database. http://www.slavevoyages.org/tast/index.faces. Accessed 23 February 2014.
** “March 2, 1807.” This Week in History, March. http://www.peacebuttons.info/E-News/images/peacehistorymarch.htm. Accessed 23 February 2014.
*** “An Act to Prohibit the Importation of Slaves into any Port or Place Within the Jurisdiction of the United States, From and After the First Day of January, in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Eight.” The Avalon Project. Yale Law School Lillian Goldman Law Library. http://avalon.law.yale.edu/19th_century/sl004.asp. Accessed 23 February 2014.

A Royal Family DNA Voyage 6 May 2018

A Royal Family Voyage

July 16, 2017

AdaEze Naja Chinyere Njoku

DNA Tested African Descendants will be taking our 1st Family Reunion Cruise on 6 May 2018 departing from Orlando, Florida.  If you would like to join us as we meet and reconnect, please register. Bring the family with you!!  We are going to have lots of fun!

This is the first of many journeys that we will be taking.  It is ONLY just the beginning!  Keep DNA testing your family and finding more relatives.  

ALL Are Invited!  Bring your church, your greek, your Masonic, your organization, your family, and friends! All are welcome!

There are so many things to do on the ship that is a part of the cruise itself, it’s just amazing!

Additionally, we will also conduct the following:

African Naming Ceremony 

Healing and Blessing Ceremony on the ship

Healing Circle at the ports

Mini Genealogy, Gedmatch and DNA Class

Meet and Greet DNA Cousins

and more…..

To request more details, click this link https://tinyurl.com/DNA-CousinsCruise2018

 

 

 

 

Ancestry.com Test Kit- Click on the image to purchase

23andMe DNA Test Kit – Click on image to purchase

Family Tree DNA Test Kit – click on image to purchase

Gedmatch Autosomal DNA Segment Analyzer (ADSA)

Autosomal DNA Segment Analyzer (ADSA)
GEDMATCH Quick Start Guide

ICW means In-Common-With were ever used

To use GEDMATCH with ADSA you must be a Tier 1 GEDMATCH member. That means you must have, at some time, donated at least $10 to GEDMATCH. The GEDMATCH upload process for DNAgedcom.com depends on two Tier 1 tools: Matching Segment Search and Triangulation which you cannot access unless you are a Tier 1 member. And, of course, you must have loaded your raw data to GEDMATCH previously so that it has been tokenized and batch processing is completed.

Some other things to be aware of:

  • Certain fields that are available for Family Tree DNA kits are not presently available for GEDMATCH. These include:

    Match Date

    Predicted Relationship

    Known Relationship

    Relationship Range

    Haplogroups

    Surnames

    Total Shared cM

    Longest Block cM

    So, this means that using these for sorting, selection, highlighting or display purposes may not have the results you wanted because these fields are empty in a GEDMATCH kit.

  • To manage processing load on GEDMATCH’s servers, only the In-Common-With (ICW) indicators for your top 400 matches are provided by GEDMATCH, so you will only have ICW bricks in the ADSA report for your longer segments. You can manually determine ICWs for other matches by doing a one-to-many report for one of your matches and comparing their list of matches to yours.

  • Generally, there are a lot more segments in a GEDMATCH ADSA report than for Family Tree DNA. This tends to slow down the responsiveness of your browser when viewing the ADSA report. You may wish to increase the minimum segment size in ADSA to 10 cM(Centimorgans)

  • The GEDMATCH tools that are used to gather the data for DNAgedcom exclude very close relatives (eg. siblings, parents, children) to improve processing performance, so you will not see them as matches on your ADSA report for GEDMATCH kits.

  • The X chromosome matches are not presently included in GEDMATCH kits.

To get started, follow these steps.

  1. If you haven’t already done so, go to www.DNAgedcom.com and click on “Register”:

  2. Register for a free account at DNAgedcom.com:

  3. Logon to DNAgedcom.com with your new username and password:

  4. Prepare to upload your GEDMATCH data to DNAgedcom.com:

    You will see a screen with a large, square text input box. Do not enter anything here yet.

  5. Leaving the window above open, create a new browser window or tab and go to the www.gedmatch.com and

    logon

    . Click on “Matching Segment Search” in the Tier 1 tools menu near the bottom of the screen:

  6. Enter your kit number and click “No” on the graphic bar (very important!) and click “Submit”:

  7. Now wait for the report to finish – it will probably take a few minutes. When it is complete it will look something like this:

    Select everything on the screen and copy it to the clipboard. In

    Windows

    you can do this using

    ctrl-a

    followed by ctrl-c. On a

    Mac

    you can use command-a and command-c. You may have to wait a little while for the copy to complete. There is a lot of data there to copy. (If you don’t wait long enough, when you paste the information into DNAgedcom you won’t get what you copied. You may see a

    hour-glass

    or spinning beach-ball while the copying is going on.

    Usually

    the copy process doesn’t take more than a minute or two.)

  8. Go to the browser window you have open to DNAgedcom.com. Click

    in

    the square box and paste what you copied into it. On

    Windows

    you can use Ctrl-v or you can use command-v on a Mac.You should see a portion of what you copied like this:

    Click the “Load” button. The load should complete in a few seconds.

  9. Click the Clear button to erase the text-input box again and return to your GEDMATCH browser window. Return to the main GEDMATCH menu again.

  10. Now click on the Triangulation tool.

  11. Enter your GEDMATCH kit number and select the middle radio button (very important!) and click on the “Triangulate” button:

  12. Wait for the report to complete. The Triangulation report may take longer than the Matching Segment Report depending on how many In-Common-With matches you have and the current load on GEDMATCH’s servers. When it finishes there will be 4 rows of asterisks on the screen and the screen will look something like this:

    Once again, select the entire page (ctrl-a or command-a) and copy it to the clipboard (ctrl-c or command-c). Wait for the copy to complete. Then switch back to your DNAgedcom browser window.

  13. Make sure the text-input box in DNAgedcom is empty (use the Clear button if you need to) and then paste the Triangulation report into the box with ctrl-v or command-v. Then click on the Load button.

  14. When the Load process completes the screen will refresh. You can now go to ADSA by selecting the Autosomal Tools menu and the Autosomal DNA Segment Analyzer option on that menu. Or you can go to this link: http://www.dnagedcom.com/adsa. You will see a screen like this:

  15. Select your kit from the drop-down menu. GEDMATCH kits will start with a letter (A=Ancestry, F=FTDNA, M=23andMe etc.):

  16. Click GET REPORT

  17. If you have Ashkenazi ancestry or are part of an endogamous (interrelated) group you may not be able to generate a report with the default input parameters. Please consult the Tips for People with Ashkenazi Ancestry page before clicking GET REPORT.

For more information about this process, how to interpret your results, or troubleshooting, read the full ADSA manual.

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