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Black and White Southern Families in Antebellum Plantation Records

 

 

The North Carolina Genealogy Society Proudly Presents… “Black and White Southern Families in Antebellum Plantation Records” featuring Ari Wilkins
The North Carolina Genealogical Society, Inc.

North Carolina Genealogical Society

The North Carolina Genealogical Society is delighted to present:
Ari Wilkins“Black and White Southern Families in Antebellum Plantation Records”
A LIVE webinar on 7 March 2018, 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm EST

This live webinar is available to NCGS members only. You must be logged in to access registration.The handout for this presentation will be posted on the NCGS website at least one week prior to the webinar. On the top menu, under Education & Events, select Webinars to go to the main webinars page. The box at the top right of that page has a link to “Member Webinar Handouts”, which is arranged in alphabetical order.

About the Webinar:

The Southern Antebellum Plantation Records are an invaluable resource to Southern and African American researchers. This extensive collection encompasses business and personal papers from numerous slaveholding families of the South. For white Southern families, the collection can uncover decades of genealogical history along with details such as the dynamics of personal relationships, communication, and the entanglements of associated families. For African American research, these records can potentially list enslaved persons by name and include other significant information such as family relationships, dates of birth and death, and bills of sale.
This presentation will demonstrate the breadth of the collection, how to navigate and apply the records to personal research.

About the Speaker:
Ari Wilkins photo   Ari Wilkins, a graduate of Louisiana State University, has been actively researching family history since 1998. Ari worked with the esteemed genealogist, Dr. James Rose, for many years on his final project Generations: The WPA Ex-Slave Narrative Database. She is the owner of the genealogical consulting company, Black Genesis. Ms. Wilkins also works as a contributor for Proquest’s African American Heritage database.
Ms. Wilkins has spoken nationally at the National Genealogical Society, Federation of Genealogical Societies, Texas State Genealogical Society, Ohio Genealogical Society, Samford Institute of Genealogical and Historical Research, American Library Association, and a multitude of local societies.
Ari has been a Library Associate at Dallas Public Library since 2007. She teaches a series of basic research classes using popular genealogical websites. She specializes in African American research.

To register for the live webinar, look under Upcoming Events on the NCGS home page. You will need to log in as a member in order to register.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.
This event is sponsored through GoToWebinar, and will be viewable via the link sent to you after registration. It will not be on the NCGS web site. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. If you use an email program that uses Sender Lists to allow receipt of email, especially Earthlink or Mindspring, you may need to add @ncgenealogy.org to your list of “approved senders” to receive email from NCGS. Remember to include the @ in front of ncgenealogy!
Webinar Viewing Options
  • Live webinars, the post-webinar Q&A sessions, and the accompanying handouts are free for NCGS members.
  • Recordings of the webinars are available to members within a few weeks of the live session.
  • A public replay of the webinar will occur on a future date that will be published on the website and in the NCGS News.

________________________________

 

Ken Trantham

Publicty Committee Chair

publicity@ncgenealogy.org

 

 

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Manumission Records of Slaves in Jamaica

Manumission Records of Slaves in Jamaica

Resource: Genealogia Nuestra – Our Ancestors access 2/11/2018

One of the terms that many of us that descend from enslaved ancestors know is the word manumission.  Manumission is the term used when referencing the freedom of those that were enslaved. The term is used when individuals managed to attain their freedom, whether through the slaveholder freeing them or through the enslaved person purchasing their freedom or a family member do thing for them.

While many of us would like to find these records, it isn’t an easy task. It becomes harder for those of us who have ancestors that come from the Caribbean. Many records have been destroyed or lost due to fire, hurricanes, the humidity, and the insects that enjoy eating through the records.

Many times when books were found to be in poor condition, they would wind up being burned as trash. Preservation is not a priority when many face struggles in feeding their families and maintaining homes.

While records are disappearing, many have taken on the mission of preserving these records, which helps many in the genealogy world discover records that were not previously available to them. Many of these preservation projects are taken on via grants through universities around the globe.

One such project is based out of the United Kingdom but easily accessible in the USA. While the project has identified that there are 70 registers but the first 4 volumes are missing. The volumes that are available are Volumes 5 through 12, contain people who were manumitted in the following parishes across Jamaica covering the time period of 1747 through 1838:
  • Clarendon
  • Hanover
  • Kingston
  • Manchester
  • Port Royal
  • Portland
  • St. Andrew
  • St. Ann
  • St. Catherine
  • St. David
  • St. Dorothy
  • St. Elizabeth
  • St. George
  • St. James
  • St. Mary
  • St. Thomas in the East
  •  St. Thomas in the Vale
  • Trelawny
  • Vere
  • Westmoreland

The volumes are as follows and if browsing from a computer, they will open in a new tab:

Emancipation Park, Kingston, Jamaica

 

Manumission Records of Slaves in Jamaica

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/51016.John_Henrik_Clarke

John Henrik ClarkeJohn Henrik Clarke > Quotes

 

John Henrik Clarke quotes – These are some of my favorite quotes

“Powerful people cannot afford to educate the people that they oppress, because once you are truly educated, you will not ask for power. You will take it.”
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/51016.John_Henrik_Clarke

 

“Whoever is in control of the hell in your life, is your devil.”

“Racists will always call you a racist when you identify their racism. To love yourself now – is a form of racism. We are the only people who are criticized for loving ourselves. and white people think when you love yourself you hate them. No, when I love myself they become irrelevant to me.”
“Powerful people can not afford to educate the people they oppress… because once you are truly educated, you will not ASK for power you will TAKE it.”
“History is not everything, but it is a starting point. History is a clock that people use to tell their political and cultural time of day. It is a compass they use to find themselves on the map of human geography. It tells them where they are, but more importantly, what they must be.”
“I only debate my equals. All others, I teach.” The best of all.

Assistant Professor of African-American History – Georgia Southern Univeristy

New Position in African-American History at
Georgia Southern University

Assistant Professor of African-American History—Search #67479
College of Arts and Humanities/Department of History

The Department of History in the College of Arts and Humanities invites applications and nominations for the position of Assistant Professor of African-American History. This position will be located on the Statesboro campus.

In January 2017, the University System of Georgia Board of Regents voted to consolidate Armstrong State University and Georgia Southern University. The new, 27,000-student university will be named Georgia Southern University with campuses in Savannah, Statesboro, and Hinesville. The expected timeline for the first entering class will be fall 2018. Complete details are available at http://consolidation.georgiasouthern.edu/.

Within this setting, the Department of History offers Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts degrees in history and a graduate certificate in Public History. The department has 38 faculty members with diverse fields of expertise. The average upper-division class size is 25 students, ensuring that students receive one-on-one attention and develop strong working relationships with faculty. The Assistant Professor of African-American History will contribute to the Department’s mission of teaching, research, and service in the classroom, the community, and the profession.

Position Description. Reporting to the department chair, the Assistant Professor of African-American History requires teaching, advisement, research, and service responsibilities. The successful candidate will regularly teach core courses in the history of the United States required of all Georgia Southern University students, courses required for the major, and a variety of upper-division courses in his or her field. In addition to pursuing an active research agenda, the successful candidate is expected to advise students and contribute to departmental governance. The position is an academic 10 month, tenure-track appointment, and the salary is competitive and commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Required Qualifications:
• Earned PhD in History with specialty in African-American history by August 1, 2018
• Ability to teach courses in African-American history in different chronological eras
• Ability to teach survey courses in the history of the United States, the undergraduate historical methods course, senior seminar, and graduate seminars
• Must be authorized to work in the United States for the duration of employment without assistance from the institution

Preferred Qualifications:
• College or university teaching experience (part-time experience is permissible)

Screening of applications begins January 19, 2018, and continues until the position is filled. The preferred position starting date is August 1, 2018. A complete application consists of a letter addressing the qualifications cited above; a curriculum vitae; an article-length writing sample, and three professional letters of recommendation. Other documentation may be requested. Only complete applications and applications submitted electronically will be considered. Finalists will be required to submit to a background investigation. Applications and nominations should be sent to:
Dr. Jonathan Bryant, Search Chair, Search #67479
Department of History
Georgia Southern University
P. O. Box 8054
Statesboro GA 30460-8054
Electronic mail: history@georgiasouthern.edu
Telephone: 912-478-4478

More information about the institution is available through http://www.georgiasouthern.edu Georgia Southern University seeks to recruit individuals who are committed to working in diverse academic and professional communities and who are committed to excellence in teaching, scholarship, and professional service within the University and beyond. The names of applicants and nominees, vitae, and other non-evaluative information may be subject to public inspection under the Georgia Open Records Act. Georgia Southern University is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity institution. Individuals who need reasonable accommodations under the ADA to participate in the search process should contact the Vice Provost.

Black and White Southern Families in Antebellum Plantation Records

Upcoming Live Webinar

Black and White Southern Families in Antebellum Plantation Records
presented by Ari Wilkins
7 March 2018 at 7:00 p.m. EST

The Southern Antebellum Plantation Records are an invaluable resource to Southern and African American researchers. This extensive collection encompasses business and personal papers from numerous slaveholding families of the South. Ari will demonstrate the breadth of the collection as well as how to navigate and apply the records to personal research.

NCGS live webinars with Q&A participation are a NCGS members-only benefit. Join NCGS today to participate in the live webinars. Public replays of recorded webinars will be announced on the website and in the NCGS News.

IRISH SLAVE TRADE LONG AGO BUT NOT FORFOTTEN (DNA)

I finally decided to post this article after some research and review of my DNA. I am a mixture of European ancestry. To be specific my ancestor DNA indicate Ireland and Wales as home to many of my ancestor.Forced to the Caribbean, South America, and the United States as slaves. Many who want to use the term indentured servant, not quite the case. There are many records of Virginia colonial townships and counties that sold white women who were slaves or indentured servants for having children with Africans without permission of their masters, along with their children by the courts to compensate the owners. Most of these slaves ended up in the Low Country of South Carolina on rice or indigo plantations.  See Westmoreland County Court Records in colonial times for examples.

The next time you see an Irish or person from Wales, you may be looking at a cousin. I think it will help to build bridges and bring understanding, not to divide us.

IRISH SLAVE TRADE – THE FORGOTTEN “WHITE” SLAVES

They came as slaves; vast human cargo transported on tall British ships bound for the Americas. They were shipped by the hundreds of thousands and included men, women, and even the youngest of children.

Whenever they rebelled or even disobeyed an order, they were punished in the harshest ways. Slave owners would hang their human property by their hands and set their hands or feet on fire as one form of punishment. They were burned alive and had their heads placed on pikes in the marketplace as a warning to other captives.

We don’t really need to go through all of the gory details, do we? We know all too well the atrocities of the African slave trade.

But, are we talking about African slavery? King James II and Charles I also led a continued effort to enslave the Irish. Britain’s famed Oliver Cromwell furthered this practice of dehumanizing one’s next door neighbor.

The Irish slave trade began when 30,000 Irish prisoners were sold as slaves to the New World. King James I Proclamation of 1625 required Irish political prisoners be sent overseas and sold to English settlers in the West Indies. By the mid-1600s, the Irish were the main slaves sold to Antigua and Montserrat. At that time, 70% of the total population of Montserrat were Irish slaves.

Ireland quickly became the biggest source of human livestock for English merchants. The majority of the early slaves to the New World were actually white.

From 1641 to 1652, over 500,000 Irish were killed by the English and another 300,000 were sold as slaves. Ireland’s population fell from about 1,500,000 to 600,000 in one single decade. Families were ripped apart as the British did not allow Irish dads to take their wives and children with them across the Atlantic. This led to a helpless population of homeless women and children. Britain’s solution was to auction them off as well.

During the 1650s, over 100,000 Irish children between the ages of 10 and 14 were taken from their parents and sold as slaves in the West Indies, Virginia, and New England. In this decade, 52,000 Irish (mostly women and children) were sold to Barbados and Virginia. Another 30,000 Irish men and women were also transported and sold to the highest bidder. In 1656, Cromwell ordered that 2000 Irish children be taken to Jamaica and sold as slaves to English settlers.

Many people today will avoid calling the Irish slaves what they truly were: Slaves. They’ll come up with terms like “Indentured Servants” to describe what occurred to the Irish. However, in most cases from the 17th and 18th centuries, Irish slaves were nothing more than human cattle.

As an example, the African slave trade was just beginning during this same period. It is well recorded that African slaves, not tainted with the stain of the hated Catholic theology and more expensive to purchase, were often treated far better than their Irish counterparts.

African slaves were very expensive during the late 1600s (50 Sterling). Irish slaves came cheap (no more than 5 Sterling). If a planter whipped or branded or beat an Irish slave to death, it was never a crime. A death was a monetary setback, but far cheaper than killing a more expensive African. The English masters quickly began breeding the Irish women for both their own personal pleasure and for greater profit. Children of slaves were themselves slaves, which increased the size of the master’s free workforce. Even if an Irish woman somehow obtained her freedom, her kids would remain slaves of her master. Thus, Irish moms, even with this new found emancipation, would seldom abandon their kids and would remain in servitude.

In time, the English thought of a better way to use these women (in many cases, girls as young as 12) to increase their market share: The settlers began to breed Irish women and girls with African men to produce slaves with a distinct complexion. These new “mulatto” slaves brought a higher price than Irish livestock and, likewise, enabled the settlers to save money rather than purchase new African slaves. This practice of interbreeding Irish females with African men went on for several decades and was so widespread that, in 1681, legislation was passed “forbidding the practice of mating Irish slave women to African slave men for the purpose of producing slaves for sale.” In short, it was stopped only because it interfered with the profits of a large slave transport company.

England continued to ship tens of thousands of Irish slaves for more than a century. Records state that, after the 1798 Irish Rebellion, thousands of Irish slaves were sold to both America and Australia. There were horrible abuses of both African and Irish captives. One British ship even dumped 1,302 slaves into the Atlantic Ocean so that the crew would have plenty of food to eat.

There is little question that the Irish experienced the horrors of slavery as much (if not more in the 17th Century) as the Africans did. There is, also, very little question that those brown, tanned faces you witness in your travels to the West Indies are very likely a combination of African and Irish ancestry. In 1839, Britain finally decided on its own to end its participation in Satan’s highway to hell and stopped transporting slaves. While their decision did not stop pirates from doing what they desired, the new law slowly concluded THIS chapter of nightmarish Irish misery.

But, if anyone, black or white, believes that slavery was only an African experience, then they’ve got it completely wrong.

Irish slavery is a subject worth remembering, not erasing from our memories.

But, where are our public (and PRIVATE) schools???? Where are the history books? Why is it so seldom discussed?

Do the memories of hundreds of thousands of Irish victims merit more than a mention from an unknown writer?

Or is their story to be one that their English pirates intended: To (unlike the African book) have the Irish story utterly and completely disappear as if it never happened.

None of the Irish victims ever made it back to their homeland to describe their ordeal. These are the lost slaves; the ones that time and biased history books conveniently forgot.


Family Search Partners with Social Media App Famicity

Access Sept 25, 2017: http://media.familysearch.org/familysearch-partners-with-social-media-app-famicity
September
21,
2017
|
05:00 PM
Europe/Amsterdam

FamilySearch Partners with Social Media App Famicity

FamilySearch announced France-based Famicity.com as its newest partner. Famicity is a free and fun social media app (IOS and Android) and website that offers family members a private social network based on a family tree to collaboratively tell and preserve their family story and capture the stories of children as family life happens and evolves.  New users just need to go to Famicity.com to get started for free.

Famicity is an intuitive, app-based tool. It is simple to use, and encourages more communication between family members. Stories, photos, and videos are easily added and conveniently time stamped. It also allows users to give other family members permission to add to a story.

Today, families are spread out geographically and lean heavily on technology like social media to communicate and share family moments. Websites like Facebook aim to bring families closer together; however, these websites can be overwhelming and lack family focus with all the content being posted by a growing subscription of friends. Famicity is private and allows invited family members to focus on sharing and preserving family-focused content.

Created from the beginning as a social media platform, “Famicity understands the needs of FamilySearch.org users and that’s why we’ve reinvented social media for each and every member of a family to bond, grow, and celebrate their lives privately and securely,” said Famicity co-founder Guillaume Languereau. “Famicity members can already create their family tree on their own. This partnership makes it even easier for FamilySearch members to sign up with their account and automatically upload their family tree into Famicity to start an online family reunion in private.”

Personal control of one’s story is important to Famicity. No account holder has access to anyone else’s information, and the user can block others if the need arises.

Famicity offers easy-to-use features:

  • Home—shared family news and photo albums
  • Story—personal space for stories and albums
  • Tree—a family tree in which relatives collaborate
  • Inbox—an option for family-focused communications
  • My Family—shareable lists and contact information for family members

“Famicity is an ad free, user friendly, and safe family social media product for sharing family moments, emotions, and memories,” said FamilySearch’s partner marketing manager, Courtney Connolly.

Connolly explained that for current FamilySearch users, Famicity can read and automatically upload relevant data from their FamilySearch Family Tree. Plans are underway for a future Famicity release that will allow users to sync information between a user’s Famicity and FamilySearch Accounts.

To get started, users need to create a free account at Famicity.com. For FamilySearch accountholders, there will be instructions how to upload their FamilySearch information to their new Famicity account.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

About Famicity

Famicity is a social network platform that allows you to share cherished family memories simply and privately, with all your relatives. It’s a living record of your family at your fingertips, without compromising your family’s privacy and confidentiality, and families everywhere are eager to fund it. With Famicity you can write, share, organize and preserve the legacy of your extended family.

My Heritage Records Collection Free for the U.S., U.K. and Ireland, Canada, and Nordic Countries for One Week

Record Week: Search One Billion Census Records for Free!

In celebration of our recent milestone — surpassing 8 billion historical records on SuperSearch — we’re happy to announce that we’re making all of our major census collections from the U.S., U.K. and Ireland, Canada, and Nordic countries free for all users for one week!


Click Image to order

Starting on Monday, August 14, and for a period of one week, no Data subscription will be required, and you can search through this treasure trove of census records for free. That’s 94 collections, containing over 1 billion census records!

With our earliest census records dating as far back as 1657, and the latest ones extending until 1940, these records are an excellent way to learn more about the lives of your ancestors and to add details to your family tree.

What can census records reveal about your family?

Census records contain valuable information just waiting to be discovered. They provide a unique view into the lives of your ancestors at the time of the census, making them a basic foundation of your family history research.

Each record typically includes details such as the names of household members, ages, places of birth, residence, occupation, immigration, citizenship details, marriage information, military service and more. Some countries recorded religious affiliation as well.

Used by governments worldwide to enumerate populations, in the world of genealogy, census records can reveal information about the daily lives of your ancestors that can be added to your family tree. Families can be traced from each census over the years, and often from location to location throughout the country.

Census records can also lead to new connections and relatives. You may be searching for one ancestor and discover additional family members or friends living in the same household whom you knew nothing about.

Which records are free on MyHeritage?

Countries
US

U.K. & Ireland
Canada

Sweden

Finland

Denmark

Number of census records 700,465,273 213,519,384 28,167,687 46,583,546 33,428,981 62,057,547
Years covered 1790 – 1940 1801 – 1911 1825 – 1911 1880 – 1920 1657 – 1915 1850 – 1930
Exclusive to MyHeritage Sweden Household Examination Books, 1880-1920 Finland Church Census and Pre-Confirmation Books, 1657-1915 Many of the Danish Censuses
Link to search Search U.S. Census Records for Free Search U.K. and Ireland Census Records for Free Search Canada Census Records for Free Search Sweden Census Records for Free Search Finland Census Records for Free Search Denmark Census Records for Free

Conclusion

To celebrate our 8 billion records milestone, searching and viewing all of our major census collections is completely free for the week of Aug 14th until Aug 20. This covers more than one billion census records from the U.S., U.K., Ireland, Canada, Sweden, Finland, Uand Denmark. It is available to users of MyHeritage as well as people who have never used MyHeritage before.

A MyHeritage Data subscription is still required to view records from other collections, and for saving records to your family tree or confirming Record Matches with any collection.

Don’t miss the opportunity to explore one billion census records for free. If you haven’t used MyHeritage before, this is a perfect opportunity to give it a try.

Enjoy!

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