Discovering DNA Communities – Ethnic Origins

A new study uses genetic data and genealogical research from more than 700,000 Ancestry.com <ancestry.com> customers to reveal migration trends in North America over the past 300 years. Findings, which were published in the journal Nature Communications <www.nature.com/article/ncomms14238>, are the basis of AncestryDNA’s Genetic Communities user experience.
According to an Ancestry,com announcement, the study shows “how specific groups of people are connected through their DNA, what places they called home, and which migration paths they followed to get there.” The results correspond strongly with documented history and the results of genetic data done by 23andMe, GPS DNA and Family Tree DNA.
Researchers first identified genetically related groups and smaller clusters within them. Then they used family trees associated with those similar DNA profiles to describe the geographic origins and migration patterns within each cluster. Of specific interest were communities that have develop distinguishable genetic patterns due to “gene flow barriers” such as isolated geographic locations or cultural identity that encourages mating within the community.
Unfortunately, there has not been a methodology research model to reasonably determine African-American and Native-American clusters based on the above mention. The DNA Communities does afford African-American and Native-Americans the opportunity to identify additional relationships based on the DNA Community findings.
If you are a member of FamilyDNA, GPS DNA or 23andMe you will find similar clusters and ethnic communities base on similar methods. The National Geographic Project (Geno 2) was the first and is still actively working to define their results. The only draw back for most is the cost which is over $200 to participate.

 

The National Genographic Project Genetic Markers

 

 

Dr. Spencer Wells, explains how genetic markers can be used to build a family tree for everyone alive today.

https://player.theplatform.com/p/ngs/geno-embed-player/select/dIUjaYsSX4AU

 

Resource: The Nstional Geongraphic “The National Genographic Project, accessed May 1, 2017, http://www.genographic.nationalgenohraphic.com

 

Living DNA and GPS Origins

Why we selected Living DNA and GPS Origins as great testing sites far more advance than Ancestry.com/DNA or 23andMe.com.

How many races are there?

Through the advancement of genetics and other scientific discovery, academics and scientists have proven that race does not exist as a biological construct. Exposing the similarities in DNA and enhancing understanding about the human journey seeks to challenge these damaging ideas and ultimately reduce racism.

Follow the journey, step on the path. Tell your story with DNA, and acknowledge all of your relatives no matter what their nationality maybe.

African Genetic Project Enrollment 23andMe

Your African heritage can help others discover theirs.

Join the African Genetics Project and help people across the world uncover their African roots.

African Genetics Project Enrollment

 

You just need to answer some eligibility questions to see if you qualify.

Personal Info
Questions
Consents
Finish

Please check that you meet all criteria below:

  1. All four of your grandparents were born in the same African country or come from the same ethnic or tribal group within one of the following countries: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea Bissau, Guinea, Côte d’Ivoire, Liberia, Republic of Congo, Senegal, Sudan, Togo.
  2. You reside in the United States
  3. You have internet access
  4. You can read and write English fluently
  5. You are over 18 years old

Who is enrolling?

  • Enrolling myself
  • Enrolling as legal representative for another adult
I certify that to the best of my knowledge the information I will provide during the enrollment process is accurate. I understand that if I misrepresent any information to obtain a 23andMe kit I may be liable to pay the full price for the kit.
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