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Genetics 101 Booklet

Must read a blog from 23 and Me (accessed November 16, 2019)

23 and Me Genetics-101-booklet

 

 

 

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Gedmatch Position After California Law Enforcement Used Gedmatch Data

(Correction) Resource: www.gedmatch.com access April 30, 2018

Presented as written.

 

April 28, 2018 We now have facility to allow users to delete their registration/profile and associated DNA and GEDCOM resources. If you are interested in how to use this facility Click here to find more information.

Deletion of Registration/Profile

Background

We now have a facility to allow a user to delete their Profile/Registration along with all of their DNA resources (ie kits they have uploaded), GEDCOM resources (ie family trees) AND their login profile (ie user login) from the current database used by www.gedmatch.com

This deletion will be permanate and cannot be undone.

Procedure

  1. You can access this facility under the “Your Log-in Profile” section with the link “View/Change/Delete your profile (password, email, groups)”.
  2. Click on the right tab labeled “Profile/Registration Deletion”.
  3. You will see DNA and GEDCOM resources and a place to verify your password at the bottom of the page.
  4. The next page is the final warning where you can click the delete button.
  5. You will then see DNA and GEDCOM resources as they are deleted – you can then click continue and will be logged out and directed to the login page.
  6. At this point your Profile/Registration and all resources are either deleted or scheduled for deletion.

 

April 27, 2018 To correct a BIG misunderstanding, we do not show any person’s DNA on GEDmatch. We only show manipulations of data such as DNA matches

April 27, 2018 We understand that the GEDmatch database was used to help identify the Golden State Killer. Although we were not approached by law enforcement or anyone else about this case or about the DNA, it has always been GEDmatch�s policy to inform users that the database could be used for other uses, as set forth in the Site Policy ( linked to the login page and https://www.gedmatch.com/policy.php). While the database was created for genealogical research, it is important that GEDmatch participants understand the possible uses of their DNA, including identification of relatives that have committed crimes or were victims of crimes. If you are concerned about non-genealogical uses of your DNA, you should not upload your DNA to the database and/or you should remove DNA that has already been uploaded. 

Genetics and the California’s Golden State Killer

It is amazing to me the number of genealogists who have stepped forward with some position and lack of confidence in Gedmatch. I do not subscribe to that line of thinking. What the media is not sharing is the platform used by Gedmatch to assist Law Enforcement. The application was built by Gedmatch and to be upfront, many testing companies were asked to help. Gedmatch is a very small company compared to FTDNS, 23andMe, and Ancestry.

Forensic genetic genealogist looked at the data provided by Gedmatch using a different Gedmatch tool. They found matches and used an interpretive pedigree process to isolate a potential suspect. Next was the collection of information to verify their conclusions.

This tool has nothing to do with the database housed on Gedmatch. At this point, I need to say I am reviewing the process. I still support Gedmatch, without the tools, it offers I would not have located and or discovered so many many relatives. Genetic or ancestors or distance cousins.

The errors and omissions set the stage for misunderstanding by news outlets and those in the genetic genealogy field of study for reasons abundant. To get noticed, recognized, accolades, see me.

The truth, Gedmatch provided no names but the data, it was Law Enforcement responsibility to determine the usefulness of the data. Once the determination was made and data numbers isolated, they could get a warrant to get the information release. They had a sample as a point of reference, not some random look in Gedmatch database.   Do not believe all that you read, I can for once say “false news or fake news”. Ask questions before you leap to conclusions, be a true genealogist or genetic genealogist and follow investigative protocol.

For further reading, I recommend Shannon Christmas blog: https://www.facebook.com/throughthetreesblog/?hc_ref=ARTKHq0LewqcBPsoSXfNXkwwSv3yVqeChJ9gBRWNADDYOWeky903CJnST49w3R5A1As&fref=nf&hc_location=group

 

Researchers Search for Disease Makers Linked to Diverse Populations

Researchers search for disease markers linked to diverse populations

Summary:
As we observe Minority Health Month, scientists are finding clues that may lead to improved treatment of diseases that disproportionately affect minorities.

In the emerging world of personalized medicine, researchers are furiously looking for disease markers specific to minority populations, and they have already made some promising discoveries. The clues they are gathering, the scientists said, could lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of chronic diseases, such as asthma and heart disease, that disproportionately affect minorities, as well as eventually helping reduce longstanding health disparities.

This is encouraging news, especially as we observe National Minority Health Month in April.

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is playing a key role in the quest to identify these so-called biomarkers, which show up in many forms, from blood proteins to genes. One recent NHLBI supported study, for example, identified a genetic marker that may help explain why the commonly used asthma drug albuterol is not as effective in African-American and Puerto Rican children as it is in European American or Mexican children. Further study of this chemical clue could lead to improved asthma therapies for all populations.

Another study, also funded by NHLBI, found that a substance called D-dimer, a byproduct of the breakdown of fibrin that is involved in blood clotting, could provide a useful marker for identifying stroke and heart disease risk in African-Americans. The substance is found at higher levels in African-Americans than in people of European ancestry, the researchers say. The researchers also confirmed that higher D-dimer levels were associated with sickle cell trait.

Both the lung and heart disease studies were made possible by genome-sequencing tools provided by NHLBI’s Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed program) Program. The program focuses on collecting and identifying genetic biomarkers from clinical study participants with heart, lung, blood, or sleep disorders. And it places special emphasis on collecting genetic data that represents the racial and ethnic diversity of the American population.

Diverse American population

“We’re elated about these early findings,” said Cashell Jaquish, Ph.D., a genetic epidemiologist at NHLBI and a researcher in the TOPMed program. “But we’re only scratching the surface of what could be a treasure trove of biomarkers, particular in minority populations that have not been sufficiently represented in previous health studies.”

Jaquish added that by including many people from different racial and ethnic backgrounds in the study, researchers will be able to understand better how genetic variations influence disease risk.

The good news, she said, is that the studies extend well beyond lung and heart disease. The TOPMed program is also looking for biomarkers related to high blood pressure, COPD, sleep apnea, obesity and atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat).

Begun in 2014, the program has sequenced more than 100,000 genomes (gene collections) using data from patients who have volunteered to participate in NHLBI clinical studies, including the Framingham Heart Study, Jackson Heart Study and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. The inclusion of these and other well-studied, multi-ethnic populations has made it easier to find biomarkers that are clinically relevant to all populations. And recent improvements in genetic technology have made sequencing faster. (Complementing TOPMed is the All of Us Research Program, a new cutting-edge effort to collect data from 1 million or more people in the United States to uncover biomarkers that can help deliver precision medicine for improved health.)

Esteban Burchard, M.D., M.P.H., a physician-scientist at the University of California, San Francisco, and the senior author of the asthma pharmacogenetics study, said the TOPMed program is “an important first step toward implementing precision medicine in all populations.”

In his asthma study, for example, Burchard and his colleagues collected genetic data from nearly 1,500 children across a wide range of ethnic backgrounds. The children had either a very high or very low drug response to albuterol. The researchers identified new genetic markers that could be used to predict which children are most likely to respond poorly to the drug. Among the top associated genes identified in the low-response group was a variant in the NFKB1 gene that is more prevalent in people with African ancestry. A better understanding of this variant could lead scientists to predict who will respond well to current and future asthma medications, the researcher said.

Burchard said that kind of discovery has value for everyone involved: “Racial and ethnic diversity in clinical and biomedical research leads to better science and improved clinical outcomes for all of us.”

A version of this blog was previously published in NHLBI News.

Posted In:

Research

After Prison: A Second Chance, a New Job, Better Health

Genetics: Skin Color and Race

Skin color and ‘race’: Genetics reveal complicated relationship

| | December 7, 2017

For much of recorded history, skin color has been loaded with powerful social meaning. Skin color plays a major part in how we define race. It also plays a significant role in racism. New studies of the genetics of skin color, though, have begun to shed light on how wrong those assumptions about the relationship between race and skin color really are.

In a new study of indigenous southern African people published … in the journal Cell, researchers … report that the number of genes involved in skin pigmentation increase in number—and therefore also complexity—the closer they reside to the equator.

[C]olor lines are, in essence, meaningless. Our skin color is the result of many, many different genes which work together in different combinations to produce different colors of skin. Many of those genes are shared across racial, cultural, and geographic boundaries.

These new studies of skin color also suggest a second theme: In genetics, the vast majority of data has been gathered from Northern Eurasian populations, and that in turn has created a biased and incomplete portrait of how the genetics of things like skin color really work.

[Editor’s note: Read full study

Read full, original post: How the Genetics of Skin Color Challenges Antiquated Ideas About Race

forwarded from the Genetic Literacy Project arch 12, 2018

AAGHS Conference 2018

 

Dear Members, Family and Friends:

We are on the countdown – the month of March is here already, to AAHGS 39th Annual Conference in Philadelphia at the Valley Forge Casino Resort, 1160 1st Avenue, King of Prussia, PA 19406 on the dates of October 11 – 13, 2018.

Are You In – Registered and Excited as We Are to Attend? Here’s the link to registered for the conferenceso claim your spot. The host, Family Quest Chapter is well into planning to make sure we have an awesome time. Let’s show our support by attending AAHGS 39thAnnual Conference; after all we’re family and connected in some way!

Share the experience of our conference perhaps with someone who has never attended before and also take pleasure while you’re there in the network opportunities by exchanging information with attendees from various places, near and far.

Don’t delay, register for the conference and book your room reservations.

2018 Conference Committee

conference@aahgs.org

 

DNADNA Visualization

Source: https://dnadna.uk/

This dna visualization was created by Mike Toogood in the UK. Still working on the software for my own genealogy. Enjoy!

Join the dots today!

Visualise your DNA Match Relationships Easily and Quickly

easy web creator
  • FREE TO USE – DNADNA is free to use – copyright reserved
  • EASY AND SIMPLE – ‘Ever played join the dots … you can use visualisation.
  • ARTISTIC – The pictures you produce are pleasing – there is no right or wrong way.
  • MEANINGFULNESS – Layout the information in a way that looks meaningful to you.

    What is DNADNA?

    Join the dots for grown up Genealogists!

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    • A VISUALISATION SYSTEM  Network Analysis pictures can be used to understand complex systems.
    • NET GRAPHS ARE IDEAL  Understand links between distant DNA cousins.
    • A DATA PRE PROCESSOR  DNADNA uses logic and simple rules to prune and select the most genealogically relevant bits from the vast amount of data that is now available as more people DNA test.
    • MATERNAL/PATERNAL/BOTH INFERENCE ENGINE  DNADNA can infer likely relationships from known ones and color your graph accordingly.

 

 

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