New GEDmatch Genesis Beta

 
 

 

GEDmatch Genesis

GEDmatch Genesis is a peek at things to come for GEDmatch. It provides two things:

    • Ability to accept uploads from testing companies with formats and SNP sets not compatible with the current main GEDmatch database.
  • A new comparison algorithm that we believe will provide better accuracy, and more flexibility. More info: The Genesis Algorithm

During this initial deployment, the GEDmatch Genesis database will be separate from the main GEDmatch database, and comparisons for one will not show entries made in the other. Eventually, the 2 databases will be merged, and results will include entries from both. Likewise, the benefits of the Genesis comparison algorithm will eventually become available to all GEDmatch users.

The initial offering of Genesis applications will be limited to autosomal DNA matches. That too will be expanded as we move forward in our effort to convert existing GEDmatch software to the new algorithm.

We hope you find this transition to GEDmatch Genesis useful.

 

 

 

The Genesis Algorithm

For several years, GEDmatch has provided genetic genealogists, both beginners and experts, the ability to search for matches among kits in their database without regard to vendor. Also, GEDmatch has provided a rich suite of analysis programs allowing users to dig deeply into the genetic details of their matches, enhance the reports from their vendors, and even pursue their own original research ideas. Our algorithms are evolving to extract the most trustworthy and meaningful matching information possible using the markers common to pairs of kits even though sometimes limited.

Unfortunately, all too often, kits appear to share a DNA segment purely by chance. To combat this confusing phenomenon, we recently have developed a reliability measure that allows users to assess the quality of a matching segment in an intuitively appealing fashion. We also use the measure to guide our matching algorithms as they wring the greatest amount of useful information possible from the markers common to pairs of kits.

If we could assume that marker characteristics were uniform in all regions within chromosomes, we could use a “one size fits all” requirement for matching segments as is sometimes done. Unfortunately, the relevant characteristics vary widely. Some long segments with few markers may be accidental matches. Some marker rich short segments are often discarded although they are profoundly non-random.

Using the characteristics of each and every marker in a segment, we compute the expected number of purely chance matches to it to be found in the database. That number is then used to classify the segment into one of several levels reflecting the likelihood that the random matches may overwhelm the real ones. When a user executes a one-to-many search or a one-to-one comparison specifying a minimum segment length, the display can then include an estimate of validity for each segment found.

One can assume those segments designated to be valid are the result of a DNA inheritance process rather than mere chance. Questions may still remain about how far back shared DNA originates, but a confounding factor has been removed.

sources:

https://genesis.gedmatch.com/select.php

https://genesis.gedmatch.com/Qblurb.html

 

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Introducing The DNA Match Review Page 23&Me

 

 

 

If you’ve taken a MyHeritage DNA test or uploaded your DNA data to MyHeritage, then you will have received a list of your DNA Matches. The list shows people whose DNA matches yours, the percentage of DNA you share, and your possible relationship. DNA results can imply several possible relationships between you and a DNA Match, such as 3rd – 4th cousin, but now you’d like to understand how you are related to the match. Where do you go from here?

We’ve just released a new feature — the DNA Match Review page — to help you answer that question. The new page offers a plethora of detailed information about each of your DNA Matches. Your DNA Match details are now consolidated into one place with different sections that will help you discover how the match may be related to you. This can open the door to new connections and discoveries to advance your family history research.

Below we describe the Match Review page comprehensively. We recommend reading this in depth because it includes important information about exciting new features, some of which are available only on MyHeritage.

Accessing the Review Match Page

On the DNA Matches list, click the “Review match” button in the bottom right corner of any of your matches, as shown below.

Accessing the new DNA Match Review page (click to zoom)

If you need a reminder on how to take full advantage of the features of the DNA Matches list, such as the powerful filters, see our previous blog post.

The DNA Match Review page shows all relevant data about the match, combining information from DNA and family trees. It is displayed in an easy to use side-by-side comparison. Here’s how the page looks, and below this image, we’ll breakdown these sections for you.

DNA Match Review page (click to zoom)

The Match Review page includes the following sections:

Smart Matches

Smart Matching™ is a MyHeritage technology that matches people in your family tree with people in other family trees that users all over the world have created on MyHeritage.

The presence of Smart Matches increases the confidence of DNA Matches — If you share a percentage of DNA with someone, and your trees also have Smart Matches, it increases the likelihood that you are related and makes it easier for you to understand how you are related. You can contact the match and learn from each other about your shared common relatives.

Smart Matches™ section (click to zoom)

When a DNA Match is correct, i.e. is not a false positive, it means that you and the match have a common ancestor, from which both of you inherited some DNA. The DNA Match is found by MyHeritage if both of you inherited the same segments of DNA from that ancestor. If you have Smart Matches with the family tree of your DNA Match, they may include your common ancestor, or at the least help point you in the direction of that ancestor.

We’ve found that in many cases, when DNA brings two relatives together, neither of them knows about the other and it is rare for their family trees to overlap. That’s why in most of the DNA Matches you’ll review, there won’t be a Smart Matches section. When it does exist, you should rejoice as you will likely be able to find out exactly how you are related.

Ancestral Surnames

Ancestral surnames are the surnames of your direct ancestors (or the surnames of the direct ancestors of your DNA Match), which are retrieved from your family trees on MyHeritage. In DNA context, ancestral surnames are very important because every person is an aggregation of DNA segments from his or her ancestors. Therefore, the ancestral surnames indicate the families from which people have inherited their DNA, assuming their family trees are correct and faithfully depict their biological roots.

On MyHeritage, most DNA customers have family trees, which is very fortunate as it allows us to retrieve ancestral surnames and compare them for most DNA Matches.

If you and a DNA Match have shared ancestral surnames, this section will show the ancestral surnames you have in common – those surnames that appear in both your family trees, going back 10 generations.

Shared Ancestral Surnames section (click to zoom)

This section can be extremely useful in determining which common ancestor you and the match share, helping you identify a potential common ancestor. Be careful though if the ancestral surname is very common, like Miller or Smith, because that is very likely not the same family. However, if the ancestral surname that you and your match share is extremely rare, such as Dankworth or Culpepper, you’re certainly on the cusp of understanding how you are related.

Click on the button “View all ancestral surnames” in the bottom right corner of this section, to see a new window with an alphabetized list of all the ancestral surnames in both your family tree and your DNA Match’s family tree. In this new window, you will be able to scroll through all ancestral surnames, and the surnames you share will be highlighted in purple.

Viewing a list of all ancestral surnames (click to zoom)

Don’t have any shared ancestral surnames? Then we will still show you the ancestral surnames in both your family tree and the match’s family tree. This could be helpful if one of their surnames is similar to yours (though with a different spelling), or perhaps a surname will ring a bell and remind you of a relative not yet listed in your tree.

For example, you may have ancestors with the last name MacQuoid but you don’t know exactly where they connect in your tree, so you’ve never added them. After reviewing a DNA Match’s ancestral surnames, you might notice they have the surname MacQuoid in their tree, and you can begin putting together the puzzle of how you are related.

Next to each ancestral surname, we also list associated countries where vital events (birth, marriage, death, burial, etc.) occurred for the ancestors with that surname. This will be useful when trying to understand the possible relationship you might have with your DNA Match. For example, if you both share an ancestral surname from the same country, it can increase the strength of the match. You might not get excited about sharing the ancestral surname of Levine, but if both of you have Levine from Hungary, that could be more interesting. In addition, if you don’t have a shared surname, but you do share ancestors from the same countries, it could mean that you both share roots in the same region.

The list of ancestral surnames and their countries, even beyond the context of DNA, is very handy. We recommend for genealogists to copy the list of ancestral surnames and use it when they email other genealogists since the list serves as a convenient way of expressing one’s research interests. Some genealogists even use the ancestral surnames list as their email signature!

Shared DNA Matches

Shared DNA Matches are people who share DNA with both you and your DNA Match, meaning both of you have the same person in your list of DNA Matches. This is another way of increasing the confidence in your DNA Match and helps you learn which side of the family your DNA Match is on.

MyHeritage has a unique way of showing Shared DNA Matches. Unlike other testing services, we display – in one chart – how both you and your DNA Match are genetically related to the same person.

Shared DNA Matches section (click to zoom)

In this section, the name of each Shared DNA Match is clickable and allows you to go to the DNA Match Review page for that specific match.

If you and your DNA Match have many Shared DNA Matches, you can click on the button “Show more DNA Matches” in the bottom right corner of the section to review all of your Shared DNA Matches.

The Shared DNA Matches page helps you cluster our DNA Matches. Each cluster may indicate matches having the same common ancestor (sometimes there may be several different ancestors). You can collaborate with your matches to try to determine who that common ancestor is.

In time, you will learn to appreciate the power of the Shared DNA Matches page. For example, if you review a match and spot your paternal uncle in the list of shared matches, that is a good indication that the match is paternal for you. Testing more of your relatives will help you get more value from the Shared DNA Matches page, as it will help you determine the path to the common ancestor for many of your matches.

Pedigree Charts

Pedigree Charts show the main individual and their direct line of ancestors, i.e., parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, etc. These charts are especially helpful when looking for common ancestors and for identifying common names, which can provide an idea of how you are related.

The Pedigree Chart section shows your match’s direct ancestors in one tab and shows your own pedigree chart in an adjacent tab. Viewing the Pedigree Chart of your match’s family tree in this way makes it easy to check where your trees may overlap, and see if you spot anything familiar.

Pedigree Charts section (click to zoom)

The Pedigree Chart is condensed to show a lot of information in little space.
To view the full tree, click “View full tree” at the bottom right corner.

Women appear in the Pedigree Chart with their maiden names. To see more information about any person, hover the mouse over the card. A callout will open, as shown below, adding more information, such as birthplace and death place. It will also provide you with handy links to view the family tree around that person, visit the profile or research that person in MyHeritage’s huge collection of 8.1 billion historical records.

Person callout in Pedigree Chart (click to zoom)

If you are using MyHeritage DNA and still don’t have a family tree on MyHeritage, please build one now. It is very helpful for making sense of your DNA Matches and will also be helpful for other users whose DNA matches your own.

Whenever viewing the family tree of another person, living ancestors will be privatized.

Shared Ethnicities

For every DNA test taken on MyHeritage, or uploaded to MyHeritage, we calculate an Ethnicity Estimate, which finds ethnic origins. MyHeritage offers a breakdown of 42 different ethnic regions – more than any other major commercial DNA testing company.

The Shared Ethnicities section compares the Ethnicity Estimate of your DNA Match to your own to find similarities. This interesting section is visual and only displayed on MyHeritage this way. You will see the exact percentage break down of your ethnicities side-by-side with your DNA Match’s ethnicities, and those you share will be highlighted in purple.

Shared Ethnicities section (click to zoom)

The Shared Ethnicities section can be useful for indicating the regions where you and your DNA Match may have common ancestral origins. Be aware though that you might share an ethnicity with a DNA Match, but not because you inherited it from the common ancestor that you share. Each of you may have gotten that ethnicity from other ancestors that you do not share.

You can use a toggle on the top right corner to show only shared ethnicities or all ethnicities. Click any ethnicity for more information about it.

Next steps

We’re not done with the Review Match page yet! Additional features are on the way to make the Review Match page even more informative and useful, such as the commonly requested Chromosome Browser, so keep an eye out for them.

Cost

For MyHeritage DNA customers, some sections on the Review Match page require a family site subscription to view them in their entirety. Users with a Premium, Premium Plus, or Complete subscription will have full access to all sections on the Review Match page, while Basic users will have a partial view of some sections.

Note: Some features listed above may not be shown for each of your DNA Matches if not relevant for that match. For example, if you match with someone who doesn’t have a family tree, then for that match you will not see tree components such as the Pedigree Chart, ancestral surnames and Smart Matches.

Conclusion

Take advantage of our new DNA Match Review page and delve into your DNA Matches. Matches previously overlooked can now be explored for new possible family connections. Instead of piecing together the puzzle yourself from scratch, these new tools will help you better understand how you are related to your matches.

Not in on the DNA action yet? Order your MyHeritage DNA kit today or, if you’ve already had your DNA tested by another company, upload your DNA data to MyHeritage and receive a comprehensive DNA Ethnicity Analysis and DNA Matching for free.

Enjoy!

MyHeritage Team

Leave a comment

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  • Jason Lee

    August 22, 2017

    Where’s the chromosome browser?

    • Esther

      August 23, 2017

      Hi Jason,

      We hope to release a chromosome browser in the near future. Stay tuned!

      Best,
      Esther / MyHeritage Team

African Royal DNA Project

Click on the link for more information:
DNA Tested African Descendants and Roots to Glory Tours have partnered to bring you the African Royal DNA Project. This project is designed to assist Africans in the …
www.rootstoglory.com

A Royal Family DNA Voyage 6 May 2018

A Royal Family Voyage

July 16, 2017

AdaEze Naja Chinyere Njoku

DNA Tested African Descendants will be taking our 1st Family Reunion Cruise on 6 May 2018 departing from Orlando, Florida.  If you would like to join us as we meet and reconnect, please register. Bring the family with you!!  We are going to have lots of fun!

This is the first of many journeys that we will be taking.  It is ONLY just the beginning!  Keep DNA testing your family and finding more relatives.  

ALL Are Invited!  Bring your church, your greek, your Masonic, your organization, your family, and friends! All are welcome!

There are so many things to do on the ship that is a part of the cruise itself, it’s just amazing!

Additionally, we will also conduct the following:

African Naming Ceremony 

Healing and Blessing Ceremony on the ship

Healing Circle at the ports

Mini Genealogy, Gedmatch and DNA Class

Meet and Greet DNA Cousins

and more…..

To request more details, click this link https://tinyurl.com/DNA-CousinsCruise2018

 

 

 

 

Ancestry.com Test Kit- Click on the image to purchase

23andMe DNA Test Kit – Click on image to purchase

Family Tree DNA Test Kit – click on image to purchase

Gedmatch Autosomal DNA Segment Analyzer (ADSA)

Autosomal DNA Segment Analyzer (ADSA)
GEDMATCH Quick Start Guide

ICW means In-Common-With were ever used

To use GEDMATCH with ADSA you must be a Tier 1 GEDMATCH member. That means you must have, at some time, donated at least $10 to GEDMATCH. The GEDMATCH upload process for DNAgedcom.com depends on two Tier 1 tools: Matching Segment Search and Triangulation which you cannot access unless you are a Tier 1 member. And, of course, you must have loaded your raw data to GEDMATCH previously so that it has been tokenized and batch processing is completed.

Some other things to be aware of:

  • Certain fields that are available for Family Tree DNA kits are not presently available for GEDMATCH. These include:

    Match Date

    Predicted Relationship

    Known Relationship

    Relationship Range

    Haplogroups

    Surnames

    Total Shared cM

    Longest Block cM

    So, this means that using these for sorting, selection, highlighting or display purposes may not have the results you wanted because these fields are empty in a GEDMATCH kit.

  • To manage processing load on GEDMATCH’s servers, only the In-Common-With (ICW) indicators for your top 400 matches are provided by GEDMATCH, so you will only have ICW bricks in the ADSA report for your longer segments. You can manually determine ICWs for other matches by doing a one-to-many report for one of your matches and comparing their list of matches to yours.

  • Generally, there are a lot more segments in a GEDMATCH ADSA report than for Family Tree DNA. This tends to slow down the responsiveness of your browser when viewing the ADSA report. You may wish to increase the minimum segment size in ADSA to 10 cM(Centimorgans)

  • The GEDMATCH tools that are used to gather the data for DNAgedcom exclude very close relatives (eg. siblings, parents, children) to improve processing performance, so you will not see them as matches on your ADSA report for GEDMATCH kits.

  • The X chromosome matches are not presently included in GEDMATCH kits.

To get started, follow these steps.

  1. If you haven’t already done so, go to www.DNAgedcom.com and click on “Register”:

  2. Register for a free account at DNAgedcom.com:

  3. Logon to DNAgedcom.com with your new username and password:

  4. Prepare to upload your GEDMATCH data to DNAgedcom.com:

    You will see a screen with a large, square text input box. Do not enter anything here yet.

  5. Leaving the window above open, create a new browser window or tab and go to the www.gedmatch.com and

    logon

    . Click on “Matching Segment Search” in the Tier 1 tools menu near the bottom of the screen:

  6. Enter your kit number and click “No” on the graphic bar (very important!) and click “Submit”:

  7. Now wait for the report to finish – it will probably take a few minutes. When it is complete it will look something like this:

    Select everything on the screen and copy it to the clipboard. In

    Windows

    you can do this using

    ctrl-a

    followed by ctrl-c. On a

    Mac

    you can use command-a and command-c. You may have to wait a little while for the copy to complete. There is a lot of data there to copy. (If you don’t wait long enough, when you paste the information into DNAgedcom you won’t get what you copied. You may see a

    hour-glass

    or spinning beach-ball while the copying is going on.

    Usually

    the copy process doesn’t take more than a minute or two.)

  8. Go to the browser window you have open to DNAgedcom.com. Click

    in

    the square box and paste what you copied into it. On

    Windows

    you can use Ctrl-v or you can use command-v on a Mac.You should see a portion of what you copied like this:

    Click the “Load” button. The load should complete in a few seconds.

  9. Click the Clear button to erase the text-input box again and return to your GEDMATCH browser window. Return to the main GEDMATCH menu again.

  10. Now click on the Triangulation tool.

  11. Enter your GEDMATCH kit number and select the middle radio button (very important!) and click on the “Triangulate” button:

  12. Wait for the report to complete. The Triangulation report may take longer than the Matching Segment Report depending on how many In-Common-With matches you have and the current load on GEDMATCH’s servers. When it finishes there will be 4 rows of asterisks on the screen and the screen will look something like this:

    Once again, select the entire page (ctrl-a or command-a) and copy it to the clipboard (ctrl-c or command-c). Wait for the copy to complete. Then switch back to your DNAgedcom browser window.

  13. Make sure the text-input box in DNAgedcom is empty (use the Clear button if you need to) and then paste the Triangulation report into the box with ctrl-v or command-v. Then click on the Load button.

  14. When the Load process completes the screen will refresh. You can now go to ADSA by selecting the Autosomal Tools menu and the Autosomal DNA Segment Analyzer option on that menu. Or you can go to this link: http://www.dnagedcom.com/adsa. You will see a screen like this:

  15. Select your kit from the drop-down menu. GEDMATCH kits will start with a letter (A=Ancestry, F=FTDNA, M=23andMe etc.):

  16. Click GET REPORT

  17. If you have Ashkenazi ancestry or are part of an endogamous (interrelated) group you may not be able to generate a report with the default input parameters. Please consult the Tips for People with Ashkenazi Ancestry page before clicking GET REPORT.

For more information about this process, how to interpret your results, or troubleshooting, read the full ADSA manual.

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