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Free Access to AmericanAncestors.org

Researchers

Free Access to ALL Databases on AmericanAncestors.org

Have some fun out of the sun this summer!
American Ancestors is granting FREE access to all online databases—highlights include our early New England collections (including the world’s largest Mayflower database) and Boston’s Catholic records from 1789 to 1900 —from now through Tuesday, July 17th.

You can use your free guest membership to search more than 1.4 billion names on AmericanAncestors.org this week. Family history is every bit as fun as a vacation on the beach—pass the word!
https://www.americanancestors.org/july

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Discovering Our DNA: Yoruba, Igbo, Fulani, Hausa

Source: African Royal DNA Project, access 7/9/2018

WE ARE ONE FAMILY OF PEOPLE, DO NOT GET TRAPPED INTO THE CONSTRUCT OF DIVISION AND ETHNICITY. 

I have have been asked to explain a few details again so all new members/subscribers can learn and receive the tools needed to dig deeper.  So here we go.

We know that many of us have taken the autosomal DNA test at FTDNA.com , 23andme.com , Ancestry.com or MyHeritage.com or other Autosomal DNA testing companies.  We are waiting patiently for that breakthrough of finding our Africa Born DNA matches.  We are hoping that the matches can tell us the ethnic group(s), family names, kingdoms and cultures from which they hail.

Regarding Africans Americans and other Africans that have been in the Diaspora for hundreds of years.  We have a different and new story to tell.  Our Ancestors passed DNA down to us.  African Descendants in the Diaspora, NEVER feel that you have to select ONLY ONE of your ethnic groups and stick with that one.  Explore ALL of your ancestry.

Our people were scattered and so was their DNA . We are an amalgamation of their struggles and their success .  We are here because of them!  African Descendants in America whose ancestors have been here for hundreds of years are of multiple African ethnic groups.  

Don’t allow anyone to tell you otherwise .  We are one from MANY !! Even on the continent of Africa , many groups intermarried .  We know the so called ethnic group is a social construct but on a realistic level, they are family groups that can trace their lineage back for generations.  Do the research yourself and ignore the “social media” scholars or anyone that has not sat down with African Elders and Royals to learn their family history.  Avoid TRIBALISM at all costs.  Tribalism is the belief that one ethnic group is better than all others and they are more superior.  No ethnic group or culture is better than the other.  We are ONE HUGE FAMILY.  This is OURSTORY

One confusing factor is ONLY testing with companies that tell you the results of one line.  That is OK to do.  I did it in 2008 .  Each generation that you go back, your ancestors double.  We have 2 parents, 4 grandparents, 8 great grandparents and so on .  Each of them could be of a different African ethnic group !! 

So In addition to testing that one line, If you can afford it , Take an Autosomal DNA test and research your actual DNA matches (REAL people that you can communicate with) .  The Autosomal DNA test costs between $79-$99 at 23andme.com , Ancestry.com or MyHeritage.com .  You may find some African matches from various ethnic groups. You may find many matches from around the world.  Keep digging .  We are more than one African ethnic group.

The chart below gives an idea of about how many ancestors you have going back 10 generations.  They may have come from different ethnic groups.  

RESEARCH EACH WEBSITE AND THEIR TERMS AND CONDITIONS BEFORE USING.

We are not going to lie to you.  We all know that there is NO GUARANTEE that you will find an Africa DNA match.  Some of us have found several matches and have reconnected with our families.

Here are some ways to widen the net though.  These helpful options are steps that I have taken myself.  They have proven to be very helpful especially since many people have DNA tested at one company and have elected NOT to test at another.

There is a place where your DNA raw data can go and meet up with other people’s DNA raw data that tested at different DNA testing companies.   We can all chillax and do this for for FREE!!  OK.. Let me clarify…. Its like a meet up for ya DNA raw data.

The goal is to upload your DNA raw data to the websites that you have not tested or to the sites like Gedmatch.com to help you compare shared segments on Chromosomes between you and others that have also uploaded.

AS ALWAYS ~~ RESEARCH THESE WEBSITES AND READ THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS BEFORE UPLOADING TO THEM.

1. Log in to the company that you took the autosomal DNA test with.  This is the test that analyzes about 98% of your DNA that is from your mother’s and your father’s side of your family.   FTDNA.com , 23andme.com , Ancestry.com or MyHeritage.com and go to DNA raw data.

2. Download the DNA raw data.

3. Rename the file to the name of the person that tested. This is VERY important!! Especially if you have more that one that you will download and it is coming from more than one company. Make each file name unique. I usually add the name and company tested on the end (examples AncestryDNA_AdaEze.zip or 23andme_AdaEze.Zip )
.
4. Save the file in a back up location because you will need it a few more times

5. Go to Gedmatch.com for FREE (register if you do not have an account)

6. Upload the DNA raw data to Gedmatch.com .  If you have issues uploading , no worries, go to step 7.

7.  EVERYONE should follow this step.  Go to Genesis.Gedmatch.com . Sign in with the same username and password that you created for your Gedmatch.com account.  (This site has a BETTER DNA matching system and  This is extremely important if you want to see if you match any of the African Royals of our African Royal DNA Project)

8.  Upload the DNA raw there as well.

10. Go to FTDNA.com for FREE (register if you do not have an account)

11. Upload the DNA raw data to FTDNA.com

12. Go to MyHeritage.com for FREE (register if you do not have an account)

13. Upload the DNA raw data to MyHeritage.com

14. Go to DNA.Land for FREE (register if you do not have an account)

15. Upload the DNA raw data to DNA.Land

16. Go to wegene.com/en/ (register if you do not have an account).  This site is for DNA percentages ONLY.  No matches.

17. Upload the DNA raw data to wegene.com/en/

18.  Go to www.gencove.com and create an account.  Verify the account creation via your email. This site is for DNA percentages ONLY.  No matches.

19.  Opt out of Research if you wish and Upload your DNA Raw Data.

20.  Create and Account at www.Geneplaza.com .  This site is for DNA percentages ONLY.  No matches.

21.  Upload your 23andme.com or Ancestry.com DNA Raw Data.

22.  Complete the steps and this link and upload the DNA raw data https://www.livingdna.com/en-us/one-family/research/apply

24. Create an account at https://www.yourdnaportal.com .  This site is for DNA percentages ONLY.  No matches.

25.  Upload your DNA raw data there to see health details and/or Population Calculations

Join us on Facebook .  Click here or the image below, select Join and answer the required questions .

AFRICAN ROYAL DNA PROJECT
We have Autosomal DNA tested several African Royals born in Ghana, Cameroon, Nigeria, Cote D’ivoire and Benin via Ancestry.com.  I have uploaded their DNA raw data to Genesis.Gedmatch.com, Gedmatch.com, FTDNA.com and MyHeriatge.com for FREE.  If you have ALREADY taken the Autosomal DNA test and have uploaded your DNA raw data to Genesis.gedmatch,com , you can check to see if you match any of them.  Click the image below for details about the African Royal DNA Project.  Click the image below.

Read More:
Discovering Our African DNA Cousins
Continue reading

Roots Reveal

Slave schedules are censuses taken in the 1850 and 1860 U.S. Federal Censuses that contain the slave-owners’ names and the age, sex, and color of each of their slaves. Columns also report the number of fugitive and manumitted slaves. There is also a column that noted enslaved people who were “deaf, blind, insane, or idiotic.”  Unfortunately, very few names of the enslaved were recorded. First names were only recorded for most who were 100 years old or older. The slave schedules are available for Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Virginia. They are not available for other states. For further reading please click the link below.

Roots Reveal: Jayson Journey

Decoding Handwritten Colonial Documents

 

Colonial Handwriting  

Link Above

Handwritten colonial documents provide a wealth of information. For colonists, the way a person wrote conveyed not only social status but also revealed one’s gender and occupation.

Purpose

The goal of this game is to decode the explicit messages of handwritten documents. Through the game, you will learn to recognize some commonly confused letters. When you are done with this game return to the general Handwriting menu, and you can practice reading longer passages from colonial manuscripts and learn more about the implicit messages colonists were sending.

Instructions

To practice identifying individual letters, begin the game and then drag the manuscript letters* on top of the print letters to which you believe they correspond. To see the answer to a single letter, hover your mouse over the letter and press SHIFT on your keyboard. To see the answers to all the letters click on SHOW ANSWERS at the top right of the screen. Click on the link below to begin!

*Manuscript letters used with permission from:
Reading early American handwriting, by Kip Sperry
Baltimore, Md. : Genealogical Pub. Co., c1998

Map of Lynching in Georgia 1880-1968

Source: Low Country Africana Research Community: African Genealogy, posted by Leslie Spencer from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution access May 8, 2018.

Interactive map of Lynching in Georgia 1880-1968

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