Advertisements

North Carolina African Americans in the Revolutionary War

North Carolina African Americans in the Revolutionary War

Josiah Abshier was head of an Anson County household of 6 “other free” in 1810 [NC:57] and 3 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:12]. He was a corporal who received a pension of $345.97 [Crow, Black Experience, 97].

Caleb Archer was head of a Hertford County household of 5 “other free” in 1790 [NC:26] and 9 in 1800 in Captain Lewis’ District. He was allowed 26 pounds pay for service in the Revolution from 10 November 1777 to 10 August 1778 [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, vol.II, Book 2, 280]. On 7 June 1792 he appointed James Carraway of Cumberland County his attorney to receive his payment for services in the Continental line in 1778 and 1779 [NCGSJ VIII:98].

Evans Archer was head of a Hertford County household of 3 “other free” in 1790 [NC:25], 3 in 1800, and 3 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:186]. He was sixty-nine years old on 27 September 1823 when he applied for a Revolutionary War pension in Hertford County Court, stating that he enlisted in Portsmouth, Virginia, for eighteen months until January 1782 [M805-25, frame 0001]. In 1835 he was listed as a Revolutionary War pensioner in a report to Congress [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XXII:571].
Archibald Artis died before November 1782 when Stephen Powell was granted administration of his estate in Johnston County, North Carolina Court on a bond of 200 pounds. The account of sales of the estate totalled a little over 43 pounds [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, III:232]. He was mentioned in the Revolutionary War pension application of Holiday Haithcock which had a testimonial by William Bryan, a Justice of the Peace

… that in the times of our Revolutionary War free negroes and mulattoes mustered in the ranks with white men in said State ..This affiant has frequently mustered in company with said free negroes and mulattoes …That class of persons were equally liable to draft – and frequently volunteered in the public Service. This affiant was in the army a short time at Wilmington at the time Craig was near that place and remembers that one mulatto was in his company as a common soldier whose name Archibald Artis – Sworn to and subscribed this 21 day November 1834.

John Artis enlisted in 1781 in Abraham Shepard’s Tenth Regiment, Colonel Hall’s Company. He left the service on 1 November 1782 [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, 17:190, 16:1007, 15:609].

James Baltrip was a Continental soldier from Bute County who enlisted on 3 September 1778: 5 feet 4″ high, 20 years old, dark hair, dark eyes [NCAr:Troop Returns by NCGSJ XV:109].

William Barber, born on 17 May 1745 in Dinwiddie County, was living in Surry County, North Carolina, on 2 January 1833 when he made a declaration in court to obtain a Revolutionary War pension. He stated that he was living in Halifax County, Virginia, when called into the service and moved to Surry County about 1805 [M805-48]. He was head of a Surry County, North Carolina household of 8 “other free” in 1810 [NC:697] and 6 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:670].

Samuel Bell was living in Sampson County, North Carolina, in February 1782 when he volunteered in Captain Coleman’s Company under Major Griffith McRae and Colonel Lytle. He marched to Wilmington, to Georgetown, and to Charleston, but was never in any engagement. After the war, he lived in Sampson County until about 1807 when he moved to Robeson County where he applied for and was granted a pension on 31 August 1832 [M804-0207, frame 0489]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 10 “other free” in 1790, 15 in 1800 [NC:509], 5 in Robeson County in 1810 [NC:234], and 2 “free colored” in Robeson County in 1820 [NC:309].

Edmund Bibby was listed among the Continental soldiers from Bute County who enlisted for nine months on 3 September 1778: Edmon Bibby, Place of Abode Bute County, born N.C., 5’4″, 20 years old, Dark Fair, Dark Eyes [NCAr:Troop Returns, Box 4, by NCGSJ XV:109]. He was the son of a “Mulatto” woman named Mary Bibby [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 36; CR 44.701.19; CR 015.70001; Bute County WB A:218, 226, 227, 232, 233].

Martin Black enlisted for three years in Stevenson’s Company of the North Carolina Continental Line on 16 May 1777. He was in Valley Forge and West Point and reenlisted for eighteen months in Evans Company in 1782 [M805-92, frame 0147]. He was head of a Carteret County household of 2 “other free” in 1790 [NC:128] and an Onslow County household of 4 “other free” in 1800 [NC:143].

Benjamin Blango was a soldier from Beaufort County whose estate was administered before June 1792 by Sarah Blango [NCGSJ XVIII:72].

John Braveboy was a “Black” tithable in Tyrrell County in 1755 [T.O. 105, box 1], head of a Beaufort County household of 1 “other free” and 6 slaves in 1790 [NC:127], 1 “other free” in 1800 [NC:4], and 1 in 1810 [NC:116]. He volunteered as a soldier in Carteret County in 1778 [The North Carolinian VI:728]. He enlisted on 27 August 1778 for three years in Captain Ballard’s Company in the North Carolina Continental Line but was listed as a deserter a little over a year later on 29 October 1779 [Clark, State Records, XVI:1020].

Jacob Braveboy was called a “bastard Mulattoe aged about 15” by the May 1774 Bertie County court when it ordered him bound as an apprentice bricklayer [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, IV:74]. He enlisted for two and one-half years as a private in Fifth Regiment, William’s Company of the N.C. Continental Line on 9 May 1776 and was discharged 10 November 1778 [N.C. Historical & Genealogical Register, II:181]. He was head of a Martin County household of 3 free males and 3 free females in William Barden’s District no. 5 for the state census in 1787 and head of a Martin County household of 10 “other free” in 1800 [NC:387].

John Brooks was a Revolutionary War pensioner from North Carolina [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XXII:571]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 5 “other free” in 1800 [NC:367] and 7 in 1810 [NC:147]. He claimed to be ninety-five or ninety-six years old on 30 May 1853 when he applied for a pension for service in the Revolution and was still living in Robeson County on 22 March 1858 when he applied for (and received) bounty land [Pension File S-6732].

David Burnett, a “man of color,” served as a soldier in Blount’s Company [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 98]. He enlisted on 2 April 1776 but was omitted from Blount’s Company in 1778 [N.C. Historical & Genealogical Register II:181]. He died without heirs and his land warrant was escheated.

William Burnett was head of a Dobbs County, North Carolina household of 5 “other free” in 1790 [NC:137]. He was twenty-three years old in 1778 when he was listed in the Militia Returns for Dobbs County [The North Carolinian VI:730]. He was a “Mulatto” who enlisted with the 10th Regiment in 1780 and was said to have died without heirs [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 98].

John Butler was a taxable “Mollato” in William Butler’s household in the 1774 Bertie County tax list of Humphrey Nichols [NC Archives file CR 10.702.1]. He was living in Bertie County on 17 November 1820 when he applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that he enlisted in May 1776 at Windsor, Bertie County, in the North Carolina Line. He was sixty-six years old and owned 220 acres of poor land that he lived on with his wife Milly, fifty years old, and four children [NCGSJ XI:22].

Moses Byrd enlisted as a musician in Lewis’ Company of the North Carolina Continental Line in Halifax County in 1776 and was omitted in January 1778 [N.C. DAR, Roster of Soldiers from N.C. in the Revolution, 112]. He was a “Mulatto” taxable in Southampton County, Virginia, in 1802 [PPTL 1792-1806, frame 546].

Reuben Byrd applied for a pension in Powhatan County on 15 June 1820 at the age of fifty-six years. He testified that he had enlisted in Hillsborough, North Carolina, and served in Captain James Gunn’s regiment of dragoons. Benjamin Sublett testified that he met Reuben, a sixteen or seventeen-year-old “Mulatto boy,” while serving in the Revolution in May 1780. Gabriel Gray testified that Reuben served as “Boman” for his brother Lieutenant William Gray. In 1820 Reuben’s family consisted of his 37 year-old wife and a seven-year-old girl [M804-243, frame 0362]. He was head of a Petersburg household of 5 “other free” in 1810 [VA:121b]. He registered in Petersburg on 9 June 1810: a brown Mulatto man, five feet seven inches high, forty seven years old, born free in Essex County, a stone mason [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 576].

Isaac Carter, called a “Mulatto” in his Revolutionary War pension application, enlisted in the 8th North Carolina Regiment on 1 September 1777, was taken prisoner, and was discharged on 20 February 1780 [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 98]. He was head of a Craven County household of 5 “other free” in 1790 [NC:131].

John Carter enlisted in Captain Quinn’s Tenth Regiment. He was engaged in skirmishes near West Point and Kings Ferry. He made a declaration in September Term 1820 Craven County court to obtain a pension. He was a cooper, living with his sister Margaret Fenner when he made his declaration in 1820. Asa Spelman testified on his behalf. He died before 30 July 1821 [M805-166, frame 497]. He was head of an “other free” Carteret County household in 1790 [NC:128, 129].

Joshua Carter, head of a Craven County household of 4 “other free” in 1790 [NC:130], received 4 pounds pay for forty days service in the Craven County Militia under Major John Tillman in an expedition to Wilmington [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, Journal “A”, 141].

Moses Carter was a “man of color” who enlisted as a private in Captain Joseph Rhodes’ 1st Regiment on 19 July 1782 until 1 July 1783. He made a declaration to obtain a pension in Sampson County on 25 October 1820 [M805-167, frame 0077]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 9 “other free” in 1790 [NC:52], 8 in 1800 [NC:515] and 6 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:278].

Jonathan Case, born say 1737, served in the Revolution in Alexander Whitehall’s Company of North Carolina Militia commanded by Colonel Samuel Jarvis [Saunders, Colonial and State Records, XVII:1054]. He was living in Currituck County on 2 June 1791 when he applied for a pension for eighteen months service as a Continental soldier [NCGSJ VIII:213]. He was head of a Currituck County household of 4 “other free” in 1790 [NC:21] and 10 in 1800 [NC:138].

Joseph Case was head of a Currituck County household of 6 “other free” in 1800 [NC:138]. He made a declaration in Currituck County Court on 10 May 1820 to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolutionary War [M805-168, S41472].

Caesar Chavis received pay for his services in the Revolution [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, vol.II, Book 2:280]. He was head of a Bertie County household of 7 “other free” in 1790 (Cezar Chevat) [NC:12].

Drury Chavis was a “Negro” who enlisted 25 May 1781 for 12 months’ service. He died without heirs and his land warrant was escheated [Crow, Black Experience, 98].

Henry Chavis was a soldier who served in the Revolution from November 1778 to August 1779. His widow Peggy made a deposition in Hertford County on 14 July 1792 to obtain his pay. William Manly attested to her statement [NCGSJ VIII:214].

Cato Copeland was head of a Craven County household of 1 “other free” in 1790 [NC:134] and 2 in Halifax County in 1810 [NC:12]. While a resident of Halifax County he applied for and was granted a pension for three years service in the 2nd North Carolina Regiment. According to the pension application he married Nancy Mitchell, 11 December 1778 Halifax County bond, 16 December 1778 marriage. Cato died in 1827 and his wife Nancy Copeland applied for a survivor’s pension on 21 November 1842 [M805-219, frame 0072].

Cubit was described as a “free black man” who was a drummer. He enlisted in 1777 and was believed to have died in Wilmington. His land warrant for 1,000 acres was escheated [Crow, Black Experience, 99].

Richard Davis was head of a Brunswick County, North Carolina household of 8 “other free” in 1800 [NC:13], probably the R. Davis who was head of a Brunswick County household of 5 “other free” in 1810 [NC:236]. In 1791 he petitioned the North Carolina General Assembly claiming that he had been an artilleryman in the Revolution, his wife had been emancipated by her master in 1784, and he asked that his children be also emancipated [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 99].

John Day was a “man of color” who enlisted in Granville County, North Carolina, in the 2nd North Carolina Regiment. He was said to have died in Valley Forge on 14 January 1778 [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 99].

Allen Demery was a taxable “Black Male” in Matthew Moore’s Bladen County household in 1770 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:50] and head of an Anson County household of 7 “other free” in 1790 [NC:35] and 5 in 1800 [NC:203]. He enlisted in the 10th North Carolina Regiment [Clark, Colonial and State Records, 16:1047].

William Dove received 4 pounds pay for 40 days service in the Craven County, North Carolina Militia under Major John Tillman in an expedition to Wilmington [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, Journal “A”, 141]. He was head of a Craven County household of 9 “other free” in 1790 [NC:131].

Thomas Dring served in Allen’s Company in the Revolutionary War and died 11 September 1777 [Clark, Colonial and State Records, XVI:1040].

Lucy Dunston was one of the “Mollatto Children of Patience Dunstan” who were bound to John Howell in Lunenburg County Court in April 1757 [Orders 1755-57, 278]. Her son Charles Dunston was bound apprentice in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 13 April 1772 [Orders 1771-73, 184]. He purchased 230 acres in Wake County on both sides of Little Lick Creek on 21 September 1787 [DB H:221]. He was living in Orange County, North Carolina, when he received his final settlement for his service in the Revolutionary War [The North Carolinian VI:755].

William Dunstan, “Molatto” son of Patience Dunstan, was one of the Continental soldiers from Bute County who volunteered for nine months [Militia Returns cited by NCGSJ XV:109].

John Ellis, born about 1754 in Virginia, moved with his mother to Nutbush District in North Carolina when he was a child and later moved to Wake County where he enlisted in the 10th Regiment of the North Carolina Line on 27 April 1776. He was a “man of Colour” who made a declaration for a pension in Wake County court on 27 July 1820. He resided in Franklin County, Illinois, on 12 September 1837 when he made another declaration to obtain a pension. He died on 21 October 1850, and his only surviving heirs James Ellis, William Ellis, Polly Ellis, Mahalah Ellis and

Henry Ellis received survivors’ benefits in 1852 [M804-916, frame 0427]. He was head of a Wake County household of 3 “other free” in 1790 [NC:103]. He sold the land which was due him for his service to Thomas Henderson, Jr., of Raleigh for $114 [N.C. Archives, Wake County folder #339].

Benjamin Flood was living in Halifax County, North Carolina, on 4 August 1789 when he deposed that he had served as an eighteen months soldier in the North Carolina Continental line and assigned all that was due to him for the service to John Eaton [NCGSJ IX:153]. He sold 640 acres in Davidson County, Tennessee, on the south side of the Cumberland River, a grant for his services in the Revolution, by Halifax County deed on 31 August 1801 [DB 18:806 & Franklin County DB 6:89]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 7 “other free” in 1800 [NC:308], 6 in 1810 [NC:19], and 7 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:148].

William Foster was a “man of colour” who enlisted for 18 months [Crow, Black Experience, 99].

Charles and Ambrose Franklin, sons of Martha Walden, died while serving in the Revolutionary War. Their heirs were granted land warrants for 228 acres. They were also granted an additional 412 acres to be released when there was additional proof of their death. The additional land was released on 13 December 1805 when Micajah Walden presented the testimony of Samuel Parker, Henry Parker, and James Bradley, Captain of the North Carolina Regiment of Halifax [NCGSJ III].

Anthony Garner was head of a Hertford County household of 2 “other free” in 1790 [NC:26]. He served in the Revolution from Hertford County (called Anthony Garnes) [National Archives pension file S38723 cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 165].

Jeffrey Garnes was a six-year-old bound by the Lunenburg County court to William Cocke to be a planter on 8 May 1765. In the 1778 Militia Returns for Captain Richard Taylor’s Company of Granville County, North Carolina, he was listed as “a black man,” twenty years old, (serving) in place of William Edwards Cock [Mil. T.R. 4-40 by Granville County Genealogical Society, Granville Connections, vol.1, no.1, 10].

Charles Gibson was living in Wayne County, North Carolina, in August 1818 when he made a declaration to obtain a pension for Revolutionary War service. He claimed that he enlisted for nine months in the Tenth Regiment at the courthouse in Northampton County, North Carolina. However, there was no record of his discharge or service. Perhaps he was the same Charles Gibson who applied for a pension from Hawkins County, Tennessee, at the age of ninety-two on 19 January 1839. He stated that he was born in Louisa County, Virginia, on 19 January 1739 and entered into the service in Salisbury, North Carolina. His neighbors, Jordan and Jonathan Gibson and Benjamin Collins, testified on his behalf [M805-355, frames 55, 62].

Edward Gowens/ Goins was listed in 1779 among the continental soldiers from Bute County who served for nine months: Edward Going private, born Virginia, 5’7″, 35 years old Black Fair; black eyes [NCGSJ XV:109]. He was head of a Person County household of 6 “other free” in 1800 [NC:599]. He and Jenkins Goins sold their claims for Revolutionary War pay to John Hall of Hyco, Caswell County, on 27 April 1791 [NCGSJ IX:224].

Jenkins Goins was a seventeen-year-old “mullato” who enlisted in Captain John Rust’s Company of Granville County militia in 1778 [The North Carolinian VI:726 (Mil. TR 4-40)].

Reeps Goins was taxable in the Granville County household of his father Edward Goins in 1761 (with his brother Edward). He was called Rapes Going when he enlisted in the Second South Carolina Regiment under Captain Thomas Hall on 1 July 1779 [Moss, Roster of S.C. Patriots in the American Revolution, 367].

Ezekiel Graves was head of a Northampton County household of 6 “other free” in 1790 [NC:72] and 3 in 1800 [NC:447]. On 22 November 1787 he applied for compensation for twelve months service as a soldier in Captain Troughton’s North Carolina Company [NCGSJ V:161].

John Gregory was head of a Craven County, North Carolina household of 2 “other free” in 1790 [NC:130] and 2 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:65]. He was seventy-four years old on 15 August 1832 when he made a declaration in Craven County Court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was living in Brunswick County, North Carolina, when he was drafted, and had two severe cuts from a sword which extended from his eyelid to the crown of his head [NCGSJ XII:186 (CR 28.301.29)].

Ned Griffin was the slave of William Kitchen. He served as a substitute for his master. The N.C. General Assembly granted him his freedom [Crow, Black Experience, 100; also recorded on first page of Edgecombe County Court Minutes 1772-1784].

Aaron Haithcock was probably an elderly man on 1 January 1796 when he and Batt Chavis sold their household goods to John Walden in Northampton County [DB 11:42]. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 5 “other free” in 1800 [NC:449]. He was allowed pay to 5 June 1781 for his services in the Revolution [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, vol. II, Book 1, 273].

Frederick Haithcock served in the Revolution from Halifax County, North Carolina [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 165]. He was head of Halifax county household of 7 “other free” in 1790 [NC:61] and 5 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:151].

Holiday Haithcock was head of a Johnston County household of 6 “other free” in 1790 [NC:142] and 6 in Orange County in 1800 [NC:569]. He had returned to Johnston County on 23 February 1836 when he made his application for a pension for his Revolutionary War service. He gave an account of his service in his application before the court and stated that he volunteered in Johnston County, spent about a year in Fayetteville, and spent about twenty years in Orange County. His application was not approved, but several prominent Johnston County citizens did their best for him. William Bryan, a Justice of the Peace, testified for him and Thompson Venable wrote to the Commissioner of Pensions in Washington, “On examining the case of Holliday Hethcock of N.C. for pension under act of June 7, 1832, we find that his services and identity are fully proven by three witnesses, and that his case has been suspended merely because he was a free man of color. As we understand that several cases of this sort have been admitted, you will oblige us by having it admitted.”

Isaac Hammond was the son of Isaac Hammond and Margaret Akin, “free Negroes.” He was baptized on 21 September 1755 at St. Thomas and St. Dennis Parish, South Carolina [Parochial Register of the Parishes of St. Thomas & St. Denis, n.p. (alphabetical listing under H)]. He was “a man of color” and a fifer in the 10th North Carolina Regiment for twelve months [M805, reel 393, S.8654]. He was head of a Fayetteville, Cumberland County, household of 5 “other free” in 1790 [NC:42].

Edward Harris was taxable in Granville County, North Carolina in 1768. He died before 14 July 1792 when his brother Gibson Harris, as “Eldest Brother & heir at law to Edward Harris decd.,” gave power of attorney to Philemon Hodges to receive his pay for service in the Revolution. His brothers, Sherwood and Solomon Harris, made a similar deposition confirming Gibson’s statement on 22 July 1792 [NCGSJ X:111].

Gibson Harris was listed in the 1778 Granville County Militia Returns for Captain Abraham Potter’s Company as a seventeen-year-old “black man,” occupation: planter [The North Carolinian VI:726 (Mil. TR 4-40)]. He was head of a Surry County, North Carolina household of 12 “other free” in 1810 [NC:684].

Henry Hawkins served in the Revolution from Halifax County [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 165]. He made a deposition in Halifax County on 23 November 1812 that he was in the service with Nathan Scott and that Scott died in the hospital in Philadelphia [LP 262, by NCGSJ VI:15].

Benjamin Hawley was underage when he enlisted for nine months in the Continental Line according to the deposition of his father Joseph Hawley who was living in Granville County on 7 June 1791 when he gave Thomas Beavan his power of attorney to collect wages due to Benjamin for service in the Revolution [NCGSJ X:112].

Joseph Hawley and his wife were taxables in Granville County in 1750 in the list of Jonathan White, and in 1754 he and his wife “Marthew” (Martha) were taxables in John Sallis’ list. (Free African American women were taxable in North Carolina). He was taxable on two “black” tithes in 1755 (himself and wife Pat) and eight “black” tithes in 1769 [CR 44.701.19]. On 25 May 1791 he gave Thomas Bevan his power of attorney to receive the wages due him for three years service as a Continental soldier [NCGSJ X:112].

Peter Hedgepeth was head of a Wake County, North Carolina household of 5 “other free” in 1790. He was living in Wake County on 21 March when he gave William Fearel power of attorney to collect his final settlement for his service in the Revolution [NCGSJ X:235].

Micajah Hicks made a declaration for a Revolutionary War pension in Orange County, North Carolina, on 27 May 1829. He claimed to have been in the battles of Gilford and Eutaw Springs, and he stated that he was a farmer with no family [NCGSJ XIII:38]. He was head of a Chatham County household of 4 “other free” in 1800. His wife Mary, aged eighty-six years old, was living in Wilkes County on 12 September 1843 when she made a declaration to obtain his pension. She stated that they were married 10 December 1780 in Chatham County on the Tar River. Her husband died on 30 December 1837 [File W-7738, by N.C. Genealogy XVIII:2715].

Charles Hood was a sixty-five-year-old “Man of Colour” living with his forty-year-old wife when he made a declaration in Orange County court to obtain a pension on 27 May 1820 [M804-1320, frame 70-78]

William Hood was a “mulatto boy” who ran away from Henry Minson of Charles City County and was taken up in Halifax County, North Carolina, according to the 21 December 1769 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 169]. He was a “Mulatto” counted in the 1786 North Carolina State Census for the Caswell District of Caswell County and head of a Rockingham County, North Carolina household of 7 “other free” in 1800 [NC:491]. He was about sixty-five years old in 1818 and living in Jefferson County, Indiana, when he applied for a pension. He died on 8 April 1829, and his wife Catherine Frances was awarded a survivor’s pension at the age of seventy in July 1855 [M804-1320, frame 644-672].

David Hunt was “a black man” listed in the Militia Returns of Captain Samuel Walker of Granville County in 1778 [The North Carolinian VI:726 (Mil. TR 4-40)].

David Ivey was a “man of color,” musician and wagoner who enlisted in the 10th North Carolina Regiment for a three-year term. His wife Nancy applied for a widow’s pension and bounty land from Perry County, Tennessee, in September 1855 at the age of ninety-one [M804-1396, frame 0486].

Francis Jack was a “man of colour” who enlisted for 18 months and died in the service. His land warrant was escheated in 1821 [Crow, Black Experience, 100].

Ezekiah Jacobs was head of a Brunswick County household of 4 “other free” in 1800 [NC:13], and 8 in 1810 [NC:236]. He recorded a certificate of his discharge from his service as a soldier in the North Carolina Line on 18 February 1788 in New Hanover County [NCGSJ XI:114].

Primus Jacobs was head of a New Hanover County household of 4 “other free” in 1790 [NC:194] and 7 “other free,” one white woman, and one white boy 5-15 years old in 1800 [NC:314]. On 15 August 1820, aged about sixty years, he made a declaration in New Hanover County Court to obtain a pension. He stated that he served in Colonel Archd. Lytle’s Regiment of the North Carolina Line in Captain Joseph Rhodes’ Company [New Hanover County Court Minutes by NCGSJ XIII:154]. His wife Ann Jacobs appeared in Cumberland County Court on 6 December 1834 and proved to the satisfaction of the court that he was a pensioner and that he died in New Hanover County on 23 July 1834 [Minutes 1831-35].

Zachariah2 Jacobs was born on 4 October 1753 according to his Revolutionary War pension application in New Hanover County on 13 December 1832 [M805-466, frame 0444]. He was a “Black” taxable in Brunswick County in 1772 [N.C. Archives file GA 11.1] and was head of a New Hanover County household of 6 “other free” in 1790 [NC:194], 10 in 1800 [NC:313], and 5 in Richland District, South Carolina, in 1810 [SC:175a]. He enlisted in October 1781 from Brunswick County, North Carolina, and left the service about a year later. He was in a skirmish near Dorchester, South Carolina, and was wounded in the leg at Guilford Court House. He married Sally Jacobs in New Hanover County in October 1791 according to her application for a pension as his surviving widow [M805-466, frame 0444]. He assigned his right to his final pay for twelve months service in the Continental Line to Isaac Cole in New Hanover County on 6 December 1791 [NCGSJ XI:114].

Benjamin James and his brother Jeremiah James gave Seth Peebles of Northampton County power of attorney to obtain settlement of their Revolutionary War service pay [NCGSJ XI:114]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 6 “other free” in 1790 [NC:68], 7 in 1800 [NC:322], 7 in 1810 [NC:29], and 5 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:153].

Elisha James was listed among the militiamen from Northampton County who were paroled by Lord Cornwallis in Halifax in 1781, probably captured during the events surrounding the Battle of Guilford Court House on 15 March 1781 [NCGSJ IV:149]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 2 males and 3 females in Captain Winborne’s District for the state census in 1786. In 1788, 1790, 1800, and 1802 he was a Halifax County taxable on one free poll in District 14 which bordered Northampton County. He was head of a Halifax County household of 6 “other free” in 1790 [NC:65], 7 in 1800 [NC:320], 4 in 1810 [NC:29], 6 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:152], and 9 “free colored” in 1830. He made a declaration in Halifax County Court to obtain a Revolutionary War pension on 16 November 1824 stating that he was sixty-five years old.

Isaac James was a private in Pearson’s 7th North Carolina Regiment in the Revolutionary War. He was head of a Hertford County household of one “other free” in 1800.

Jeremiah James was head of a Northampton County household of 3 “other free” in 1790 [NC:73] and 6 in 1800 [NC:453]. His estate, administered in Northampton County on 3 December 1805, named his widow Rebecca James. She was granted a survivor’s Revolutionary War pension from Maury County, Tennessee, after giving evidence that he had entered the service in Bertie County in Captain Blount’s Company of the 10th Regiment for nine months on 20 July 1778 and again as a private in Captain Raiford’s Company from 17 May 1781 to 15 April 1782. She was born in Virginia in May 1758 and married Jeremiah in Northampton County about February or March 1790. Jeremiah died on 1 October 1805, and she married Isham Scott about a year later. After Scott died, she moved to Maury County, Tennessee.

Thomas James was the six-year-old son of Betty James, a “Free Mulatoe,” ordered bound to John Moore in Bertie County in May 1763. Humphrey Hardy was granted administration on his estate on 6 August 1792 with 500 pounds security [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, VI:957]. The administrator had a certificate from the Board of Army Accounts that wages due were settled at Halifax in the amount of 69 pounds [Bertie Estate Papers].

Jacob Jeffries was head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 9 “other free” in 1800 [NC:514]. He recorded a certificate in Orange County on 24 July 1791 that he was the “Mulatto Jacob” who received a discharge for twelve months service as a soldier in the Revolution [NCGSJ XI:115].

John Jeffries was listed as a volunteer Continental soldier from Bute County in 1779: born about 1759 in North Carolina, 5’6″ tall, dark hair and dark eyes [NCGSJ XV:109].

Another John Jeffries was the father of Thomas Jeffries who appeared in Orange County, North Carolina court on 26 May 1837 to obtain a pension for his father’s services in the Revolution. He stated that his father was born in Halifax County, Virginia, in 1733 (perhaps date in error and place meant to be Halifax County, North Carolina), was drafted in the fall of the years 1780 and 1781, that his father was very infirm and blind in December 1832 when he moved him to Orange County, and that his father died 4 December 1834 leaving no widow [M804-1409, frames 350-1].

Francis Jones was a “Black” member of Captain James Fason’s colonial Northampton County, North Carolina Militia [N.C. Archives Troop Returns, 1-3]. He was head of a Wake County household of 5 “other free” in 1790 [NC:103] and 8 “free colored” in Caswell County in 1820 [NC:66]. On 6 June 1818 he testified on behalf of Allen Sweat in Wake County Court that he had served with him in the Revolutionary War [M804-2332].

Philip Jones was head of a Halifax County household of 7 “other free” in 1790 [NC:65] and 2 in 1800 (called Philip, Senr.) [NC:322]. He made a deposition in Northampton County Court on 26 March 1791 that he enlisted and served as a soldier in the Continental Army [NCGSJ XI:118]. He may have been the Philip Jones who sometime before 7 September 1787 sold Bounty Land in Davidson County, Tennessee, which he received for his services in the War [Franklin County DB 6:89].

James Kersey was born about 1764 according to the 1782 Militia Returns for Bladen County [The North Carolinian VI:751]. He was head of a Robeson County household of one “other free” in 1800 [NC:388]. On 24 February 1834 he made a declaration in Robeson County Court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in 1762, volunteered in a company of militia on 1 August 1782 in what was then Bladen County in the town of Elizabeth. He marched to Charleston, South Carolina, to James Island, and received his discharge in Wilmington on 1 August 1783. He was inscribed in the Roll of North Carolina on 4 March 1831 [M804-1477, S-8788].

Morgan Lewis was head of a Halifax County household of 4 “other free” in 1790 [NC:62], 3 in 1800 [NC:324], and 4 in 1810 [NC:33]. He was seventy years old on 22 August 1821 when he made a declaration in Halifax County court to obtain a pension for his services as a private in the 10th Regiment of the North Carolina Line. His family at that time consisted of his seventy-year-old wife, two daughters, and a two-year-old grandson [M804-1558].

Job Lott enlisted in 1777 for two and one-half years, but died in June 1777. He served in the 5th Regiment [Crow, Black Experience, 101].

William Lomack was head of a Robeson County household of 10 “other free” in 1810. He was a Revolutionary War veteran [NCGSJ XIV:45].

Billing Lucas, a “man of color,” enlisted for nine months in the 10th North Carolina Regiment and died September 5, 1779 [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 101].

Moses Manly enlisted with Colonel Lytle in the Tenth North Carolina Regiment for nine months in August 1781. He made a declaration in Hertford County Court for a pension on 17 August 1819 and a second declaration in Halifax County Court on 26 October 1821 [M805, reel 549, frame 703]. He was head of a Bertie County household of 3 “other free” in 1790 [NC:14] and a Halifax County household of 5 in 1800 [NC:328], 7 in 1810 [NC:36], and 7 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:157]. On 18 August 1834 his widow Chloe Manley applied to the Halifax County Court to receive her husband’s Revolutionary War pension and proved to the Court’s satisfaction that “said Chloe is the widow of said Moses & that said Moses departed this life on 16 May 1834.”

Moses Manly’s son Arthur, head of a Halifax County household of 4 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:157], was in the First Company detached from the Halifax County Regiment in the War of 1812 [N.C. Adjutant General, Muster Rolls of the War of 1812 from the Militia of North Carolina, 19]. He was living in Weldon in May 1844 when he made a declaration in Halifax County Court to obtain the pension of Moses Manly, deceased [M805, reel 807, frame 712].

Christopher Manuel a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 8 “other free” in 1790 [NC:75], 11 in Sampson County in 1800 [NC:517] and 6 “free colored” in Sampson County in 1820 [NC:308]. He was about eighty years old on 19 November 1832 when he made a declaration in Sampson County court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Halifax County, North Carolina, and moved to the part of Duplin County which became Sampson County before the war [M804-1627].

Jesse Manuel was head of a Sampson County household of 6 “other free” in 1790 [NC:51]. He made a declaration in Sampson County Court to obtain a Revolutionary War pension. He received his final settlement certificate as a twelve months soldier on 25 December 1787 [NCGSJ XIII:93].

Nicholas Manuel was head of a Sampson County household of 5 “other free” in 1790 [NC:51], 9 in 1800, was counted as white in 1810 [NC:472], and was a “sleymaker,” head of a Sampson County household of 3 “free colored” in 1820. His widow Milly Manuel was about eighty-eight years old on 11 November 1845 when she made a declaration in Sampson County court to obtain a widow’s pension for her husband’s services in the Revolution. She stated that they were married by Fleet Cooper, Esq., in Duplin County and that her son Shadrack Manuel was born the day (Corn)Wallis was captured. Her husband died on 27 March 1835. Milly died before 30 March 1855 when Shadrack, heir at law of Nicholas Manuel, appointed attorneys to receive his survivor’s pension [M804-1627].

Absalom Martin enlisted in the town of Beaufort, North Carolina, for twelve months in Captain William Dennis’ Company in the 1st North Carolina Regiment in April 1781. He made a declaration in Carteret County court to obtain a pension on 22 August 1820. He owned 140 acres of “barren pine land.” He died eight years later on 20 September 1828 [M805, reel 0555, frame 20]. He was head of a Carteret County household of 9 “other free” in 1790 [NC:128], 12 in 1800, 16 in 1810 [NC:443], and 7 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:121].

Jesse Martin enlisted for nine months in 1780 in Captain Arthur Gatling’s regiment of the North Carolina Line commanded by Colonel Armstrong. He was discharged in Stono, South Carolina, in 1781. He was an infirm farmer with no family except his wife Sarah when he made a declaration to obtain a pension in Gates County court on 15 August 1825 [M805, reel 883, frame 836]. He was head of a Gates County household of 8 “other free” in 1790 [NC:23], 9 in 1800 [NC:273], 7 in 1810 [NC:842], and 7 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:162].

John Martin was head of a New Hanover County household of 6 “other free” in 1790 [NC:194] and 11 in 1800 [NC:310]. He gave power of attorney to Thomas Nuse to receive his final settlement for service in the Continental Line on 9 September 1791. John Williams, a justice of the peace for New Hanover County, attested that he served in 1782 [NCGSJ XIII:94].

Patrick Mason was head of a Person County household of 6 “other free” in 1800 [NC:613] and 10 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:498]. He made a declaration in Person County Court on 12 May 1828 to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born about 1762 and enlisted for twelve months on 1 April 1780 [NCGSJ XIV:172].

Daniel Mills was listed in the Militia Returns of Halifax County, North Carolina, as a twenty-year-old planter born in Halifax County [The North Carolinian VI:727]. He appointed Benjamin Hawkins of Warren County his attorney to receive his final settlement pay for service in the North Carolina Continental Line on 23 March 1791 [NCGSJ XIII:98].

Mingo enlisted in June 1776 in the North Carolina Line. He was listed as a pensioner in 1835 [Crow, Black Experience, 101].

Simeon Moore was charged in Craven County court on 13 September 1782 with having joined the British. He was released when he consented to join the Continental Army [Minutes 1779-84, 47b]. He was head of a Jones County household of 5 “other free” in 1810 [NC:270].

Isaac Morgan was sixteen years old in 1782 when he was a “Mulatto” listed among the Drafts & Substitutes from Edgecombe County in the Revolutionary War [The North Carolinian VI:752]. He was a “Mulatto” head of an Edgecombe County household of 6 “other free” and one white woman in 1800 [NC:223].

Mark Murray was head of a Halifax County household of 9 “other free” in 1790 [NC:64], and he was also counted with 9 in his household in Martin County in 1790 [NC:69]. On 23 October 1832 he testified in Halifax County Court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was about seventy-two years old, born and raised in Caroline County, Virginia, moved from there to Hanover County and from there to Halifax County, North Carolina, about 1792. He gave his age as eighty-nine years on 5 May 1845 when he applied for a pension while living in Wilson County, Tennessee. He stated that he enlisted in 1780, but had no record of his service because he left his discharge papers with his father who died shortly after the Revolution. His application was rejected [M840-1796, frames 1-57].

Ethelred Newsom was a soldier in the Tenth Regiment of the North Carolina Continental Line [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1126], called “Netheneldred Newsom of Robeson County” on 18 April 1792 when he appointed Jacob Rhodes his attorney to receive his final settlement for serving in the war [NCGSJ XIV:111]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 3 “other free” in 1790 [NC:50], 3 in 1800 [NC:408], and 4 in 1810 [NC:241].

Carter Nickens was taxable in Hertford County on one person in 1768 and 1769, on two persons in 1770, and taxable on 2 horses and 2 cattle in the 1779 Hertford County property tax list filed with the central government [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 13; GA 30.1]. He was paid for services to the Revolution [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, vol. I, Book 4:232].

Edward Nickens was a soldier in the Revolutionary War who was deceased by 5 December 1792 when a petition by his son and heir Richard Nickens was placed before the North Carolina General Assembly [LP 117 by NCGSJ IV:174].

Malachi Nickens was living in Hertford County in 1781 when he enlisted as a private in Colonel Armstrong’s North Carolina Regiment. He was about fifty-six years old on 13 November 1821 when he testified in Hertford County court that he was a common laborer living with his wife Margaret and a seventeen-month-old child Manuel Murfee. James Smith testified on his behalf [M805, frame 0198]. Malachi was head of a Hertford County household of 5 “other free” in 1790 [NC:26], 3 in 1800, and 3 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:190].

Jacob Norton was a “man of colour” who died in Revolutionary War service and left no heirs according to a deposition by Charles Hood in Orange County, North Carolina, in 1820 [The North Carolinian, p. 2578].

Obed Norwood, a “Molato” boy of Nan Norwood, was bound to Keziah Shackleford in Carteret County on 6 September 1759 [Minutes 1747-64, 259]. His age was estimated at thirteen years in June 1770 when James Shackleford asked that he be bound to him as a cooper [Minutes 1764-77, 388]. He was called Obid Norward in the 1778 Carteret County Militia Returns [The North Carolinian VI:728].

Theophilus/Foy Norwood was a six-year-old “Molato” boy of Nan Norwood, a “Molato” woman, ordered bound to Keziah Shackleford in Carteret County on 6 September 1759 [Minutes 1747-64, 251]. His age was estimated at fifteen years in June 1770 when he consented to his indenture to William Fulford [Minutes 1764-77, 388]. He was twenty-seven years old in 1778 when he was listed in the Carteret County Militia Returns [The North Carolinian VI:728].

John Overton was a soldier in the North Carolina Line who died before 16 July 1791 when Titus Overton was appointed administrator of his Cumberland County estate [NCGSJ XIV:115-6]. Titus was head of a Cumberland County household of 11 “other free” in 1790 [NC:31], 7 in 1800, and 1 in 1810 [NC:600].

Lemuel Overton was head of Perquimans County household of 2 “other free” in 1790 [NC:31]. He was the husband of a slave named Rose and children John and Burdock who were emancipated by order of the North Carolina General Assembly. They were probably his slaves since the owner’s name was not stated [Byrd, In Full Force and Virtue, 298]. He was living in Pasquotank County on 10 July 1820 when he appointed James Freeman his attorney to obtain a land warrant for his services as a soldier in the 10th Regiment of the North Carolina Line [NCGSJ VII:93].

Samuel Overton was a “Molatto” Perquimans County taxable in 1771 [CR 77.701.1]. and head of a Pasquotank County household of 3 “other free” in 1790 [NC:31], 4 in 1800 [NC:634], and 13 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:277]. He was called a “free man of Colour” on 8 March 1825 when he made a declaration in Pasquotank County court to obtain a Revolutionary War pension. He claimed that he was ninety-six years old, the father of a five-year-old boy David and that he had lost all his property by a fire in July 1824 [M804-1854, frame 0826].

Titus Overton was taxable on 2 “Mulatto” tithes in Cumberland County in 1767, was taxable with his wife (“Mulatoes”) in Bladen County from 1770 to 1776 and was taxable in Bladen County on 500 acres, 3 horses, and 3 head of cattle in 1779 [SS 837; N.C. Genealogy XXI:3136; Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:32, 89, 123; II:90, 146]. He received 2 pounds, 2 shillings for twenty-one days service in the Bladen County Militia between 1775 and 1776 under Captain James Council [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, Journal “A”, 22].

Elisha Parker, a “man of color,” was about eighty years old on 20 November 1832 when he made a declaration in Gates County, North Carolina, to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Nansemond County, Virginia, near the North Carolina line about 1752. He was said to have been about seventy-five years old on 10 February 1834 when he made a similar declaration in Nansemond County court, stating that he entered the service in Gates County about 1779 as a substitute for Francis Speight and had been a resident of Nansemond County for the previous forty-five years [M804-1871, frame 0787]. He was head of a Gates County household of 4 “other free” in 1790 [NC:23] and 3 “free colored” in Nansemond County in 1820 [VA:79].

Isaac Perkins was head of a Craven County household of 2 “other free” in 1790 [NC:131] and 2 “free colored” in Craven County in 1820 [NC:67]. He made a declaration in Craven County Court to obtain a Revolutionary War pension on 13 May 1829. He testified that he enlisted for three years in May 1778 and was granted pension certificate no. 4666 on 30 November 1818. His lawyer, Samuel Gerock, called him a “Negroe Man, and Old Soldier of the Revolutionary Army” when he appealed for the restoration of his pension [National Archives Inv. File 41.953].

Drury Pettiford was head of a Stokes County household of 11 “other free” in 1810 [NC:607]. In his application for a pension on 25 August 1820 he stated that he enlisted in Virginia, that his age was sixty-nine years, and the age of his wife Dicy was sixty-six [CR 099.928.11 by NCGSJ XV:162].

George Pettiford was head of a Granville County household of 7 “other free” in 1800. At the age of sixty-three on 10 February 1821 he made a declaration in Granville County Court in order to obtain a Revolutionary War pension [NCGSJ XV:162].

Philip Pettiford was head of an Oxford District household of 5 male and 3 female “Blacks” and one white male in 1786 for the state census. He had moved to Cumberland County by 1790 where he was head of a household of 9 “other free” [NC:40]. On 5 September 1820 in Granville County Court he applied for a Revolutionary War pension [NCGSJ XV:162]. His final pension payment papers recorded his death on 13 April 1825 [National Archives].

William Pettiford was listed in the 1778 Militia Returns for Granville County in Captain William Gill’s Company as a seventeen-year-old “black man” [The North Carolinian VI:726 (Mil. TR 4-40)].

Israel Pierce was a “free colored” head of a Tyrrell County household of 3 free males and 3 free females in 1790 [NC:34], 7 “other free” in Hyde County in 1800 [NC:374], 11 in Hyde County in 1810 [NC:119] and 8 “free colored” in Beaufort County in 1820 [NC:32]. He was in Tyrrell County on 21 June 1791 when he gave power of attorney to Samuel Warren, an attorney, to receive his final settlement due him as a soldier in the North Carolina Continental Line [NCGSJ XIV:230].

William Pierce died before 13 June 1795 when “Thomas Pierce of Tyrrell County, administrator of William Pierce,” gave power of attorney to Samuel Warren, an attorney, to receive the final settlement due for his service in the North Carolina Continental Line [NCGSJ XIV:230]. (Thomas Pierce was a “free colored” head of a Tyrrell County household of 4 free males and 4 free females in 1790 [NC:34]).

Arthur Pugh, born about 1761, was described as a Mulatto bastard of Sarah when he was bound as an apprentice cooper to James Holley in Bertie County on 30 March 1767 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:765]. He was listed in the roster of soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution.

David Pugh was head of a Hertford County household of 6 “other free” in 1800. He was listed in the roster of soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution.

William Redman was head of a Lincoln County, North Carolina household of 11 “other free” in 1800 [NC:900] and 4 “other free” and a white woman in Rutherford County in 1810 [NC:431]. He made a declaration in Buncombe County Court on 7 April 1820 to obtain a Revolutionary War pension. He stated that he was about sixty-nine years old and enlisted in 1775 [M805-679, frame 0652].

Jacob Reed served in the Revolutionary War. He died before 23 May 1792 when the Gates County Court appointed (his mother?) Rachel Reid, administratrix of his estate. On 4 August 1792 in Gates County she gave her son Benjamin power of attorney to settle the balance of his army wages from 20 November 1778 to June 1779 [NCGSJ XV:103]. Rachel was a “mixt Blood” taxable in Hertford County on one person in 1768 and 1769 and on two persons in 1770 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 50]. She was head of a Gates County household of 2 “other free” in 1790 (abstracted as Rachel Rude) [NC:24] and 5 “free colored” in Edenton, Chowan County, in 1820 [NC:130].

Benjamin Reed enlisted with Colonel Murfree for the term of the war. He made a declaration in Gates County Court to obtain a pension on 19 November 1821, saying he had a stiff arm from a wound, and he had a sixty-two-year-old wife named Treasey [M805, reel 680, frame 89]. He was head of a Gates County household of 3 “other free” in 1790 (abstracted as Rude) [NC:22], 3 in 1810 [NC:842], and 3 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:154].

Dempsey Reed was listed in the Revolutionary War accounts, hired as a substitute by Nathaniel Harris in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 101]. He was head of a Warren County household of 8 “other free” in 1790 [NC:78], 13 in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, in 1800 [NC:534], and 12 “free colored” in Cabarrus County in 1820 [NC:160].

Isaac Reed was taxed as a “Negro man” with a “Negro” woman in an untitled 1766 Chowan tax list, and in 1768 and 1769 he and his wife Margaret were taxables in Timothy Walton’s list for Chowan County [CR 24.701.2]. His land on the east side of Bennett’s Creek was mentioned in an 8 June 1799 Gates County deed [DB 4:345 by Taylor, Abstracts of Deed Books A-5, 188]. The Gates County Court appointed him administrator of the estate of Jacob Reid on 22 May 1792 [Fouts, Minutes of County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1787-93, 110]. As administrator of the estate he appointed Samuel Smith attorney to settle the Continental Army Accounts of (his son?) Jacob Reid, Jr., from 10 December 1778 to 10 April 1779. On 5 June 1792 Captain Arthur Gatling testified in Northampton County, North Carolina Court that Jacob was a soldier in a company of new levies on the Continental Establishment which he marched from Hertford to South Carolina from November 1778 to March 1779, and Jacob died in the service in South Carolina [NCGSJ XV:102]. Isaac was head of a Gates County household of 4 “other free,” one white woman, and one white male over sixteen years of age in 1790 [NC:23].

Jacob Reed served in the Revolutionary War and died before 23 May 1792 when the Gates County court appointed (his mother) Rachel Reid, administratrix of his estate. On 4 August 1792 in Gates County she gave her son Benjamin power of attorney to settle the balance of his army wages from 20 November 1778 to June 1779 [NCGSJ XV:103].

Micajah Reed was head of a Gates County household of 4 “other free” in 1790 [NC:24], 8 in 1800 [NC:277], 10 in 1810 [NC:853], and 11 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:155]. In August 1817 he proved to the Gates County Court that he was the lawful heir of Nathaniel Hall, who died in Revolutionary War service. Nathaniel may have been the father of Nathaniel Hall, a “Molatto Boy,” born about 1786, bound an apprentice cooper in Gates County in May 1806 [Fouts, Minutes of Gates County, IV:1001; III:499].

Benjamin Richardson, married Mary Bass, widow of Elijah Bass, 13 February 1783 Granville County bond with Philip Pettiford as bondsman. She was also called Mary Bass on her 13 February 1777 Bute County marriage bond to Elijah Bass [M804-2038, frame 0533]. Mary made an application on 11 October 1841 application for his Revolutionary War pension. He “went out of Halifax and Warren Counties” and enlisted in the militia in September 1780 [M804-2038, frame 0520]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 10 “other free” in 1800 [NC:338]. John King of Franklin County and David King of Warren County testified on her behalf that they also served in the Revolution and were acquainted with both her husbands. J.R.J. Daniel of Halifax County called their family, “free persons of color & generally … industrious & well behaved people” on 24 May 1855 when he wrote an affidavit for the pension application of Benjamin and Mary’s children [M804-2038, frames 525-7, 0537].

Jonathan Roberts received 18 shillings, 8 pence pay for 7 days service in the Northampton County, North Carolina Militia under Colonel Allen Jones in 1775-1776 [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, Journal “A”, 20]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 5 “other free” in 1790 [NC:73], 10 in 1800 [NC:473], and 8 in 1810 [NC:743].

Ishmael Roberts was head of a Robeson County household of 10 “other free” in 1790 [NC:50], 15 in 1800 [NC:415], and 14 in Chatham County in 1810 [NC:195]. He received pay for Revolutionary War service from 3 June 1777 to 3 June 1778 as a private in Colonel Abraham Shepherd’s Company. Colonel Shepherd gave him a certificate which stated that he was furloughed at Head Quarters Valley Forge to come home with me who was Inlisted in my Regement for the Term of three years – and Returned Home with me [NCGSJ XV:105].

Jack Rock was a “man of colour” and soldier in the Continental Army. His land warrant was escheated in 1821 [Crow, Black Experience, 102].

Charles Randolph Rowe, born about 1759 in Virginia, one of the Continental soldiers who volunteered in Bute County in 1779 (abstracted as Charles Kons[?] in NCGSJ): 5’8″ tall, dark hair and dark eyes [NCGSJ XV:109 & The North Carolinian VI:727]. He was called Randolph Rowe when he married Susannah Stewart, 17 December 1793 Warren County bond with Richard Evans bondsman, and he was called Charles Rowe when he married, second, Elizabeth Taborn, 11 December 1797 Granville County bond, Solomon Harris bondsman. He was head of a Wake County household of 2 “other free” in 1800 [NC:793], 5 in Chatham County in 1810 (called Randolf Roe) [NC:201], and 2 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:209]. He received a pension in 1832 when he was seventy-eight years old [M804-2072].

James Rowe was granted land for service in the Revolution [Franklin County, North Carolina DB 6:780].

Caesar Santee enlisted in the 2nd Regiment. He was granted a land warrant for 640 acres in 1783 [Crow, Black Experience, 102].

Hill Scipio served from 1781 to April 22, 1782 [Crow, Black Experience, 102].

Emanuel Scott made a deposition in Halifax County Court on 22 August 1789 that he was a twelve months soldier in the Continental Line [NCGSJ XV:232]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 7 “other free” in 1790, 2 in 1800 [NC:342], and 6 in Cumberland County in 1810 [NC:599].

Isham Scott was head of a Halifax County household of 8 “other free” in 1800 [NC:342] and 8 in 1810 [NC:49]. He made a declaration in order to obtain a Revolutionary War pension before the Halifax County Court at the age of sixty on 19 May 1823. He stated that he was a servant to Major Hogg and was at the skirmish at Halifax.

Lewis Simms was a “black man” listed in the militia returns for Granville County, North Carolina, in 1778 [N.C. Archives Troop Returns 4-40; The North Carolinian, 1960, p.727].

James Smith was head of a Hertford County household of 6 “other free” in 1790 [NC:25], 4 in Captain Moore’s District in 1800, and 11 “free colored” in 1820. He enlisted in the 10th North Carolina Regiment for three years and reenlisted for twelve more months in December 1781 [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 102].

Aaron Spelman, born about 1753, was about nine years old when he was bound out by the April 1762 Craven County Court [Minutes 1761-62, 104b]. He was head of Craven County household of 3 “other free” in 1790 [NC:134], called Aaron Spelmore on 18 January 1791 when he assigned his right to his final settlement for services in the “Twelve Months Draftees” in the Revolution [T&C, Box 22, by NCGSJ XVI:234]. He was called Aaron Spelmore on 12 September 1820 when he made a declaration in Craven County Court to obtain a pension for his service under Captain Sharpe in the Tenth North Carolina Regiment [Minutes 1820 and 1821, 125-6, 262-3, by NCGSJ XV:33].

Asa Spelman was head of a Craven County household of 5 “other free” in 1790 [NC:134] and 4 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:72]. He was called Asa Spelmore alias Spelman on 13 September 1820 when he made a declaration in Craven County court to obtain a pension for service with Captain Quinn in the tenth North Carolina Regiment. He stated that during his nine months service he was engaged in a skirmish at West Point and at Kings Ferry in Jersey. Isaac Perkins testified that he had seen Asa while they were both on duty in White Plains, New York. John Carter testified that Asa and he were in the same regiment. Asa was a cooper with no family but his unnamed brother (Aaron?) who he was living with in 1820 [Craven County Minutes, September 1820, 136-8; 1821, 185; and May 1822, 16 by NCGSJ XVII:33].

Dempsey Stewart, born about 1764, enlisted in the 1st North Carolina Regiment for eighteen months while residing in Northampton County, North Carolina. He was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, Virginia, from 1793 to 1815: listed as a “Free Person of Colour” in 1810 and 1811, a “Free Negro” from 1813 to 1815 [PPTL 1782-1798, frames 401, 497, 543; 1799-1815, frames 197, 259, 295, 349, 394, 478, 520, 559, 637, 675, 733]. He registered in Petersburg on 9 November 1805: a brown Free Negro man, five feet ten inches high, thin made, about forty one years old, Born free p. register from the Clk of Brunswick County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 368]. He was head of a Free Town, Brunswick County household of 4 “other free” in 1810 [VA:770], 2 “free colored” over forty-five years old in 1820 [VA:670], and 5 in 1830 [VA:249]. He was about fifty-seven years old on 27 January 1823 when he made a declaration in Brunswick County court, stating that he had entered the service in 1782, that his property included 60 acres of land, and that his family consisted of his wife who was about fifty-six [M804-2290, frame 0162].

Edward Stewart was a “yellow” complexioned man born in Chesterfield County who was living in Dinwiddie County when he was listed as a substitute in the Revolution [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 154]. He was a “Mulatto” taxable on a tithe and 2-3 horses in Chesterfield County from 1791 to 1811: called “Edward Stewart, Jr.” from 1796 to 1801, a farmer taxable on 2 tithes and 4 horses in 1809 when he was living at Booker’s shop, and living on Jones’s land with 3 in his family in 1811 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 92, 205, 272, 343, 488, 529, 604, 642, 689, 738, 824]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 11 June 1810: forty eight years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 131].

Jordan Stewart, born about 1765 in Dinwiddie County, was head of a Chatham County, North Carolina household of 8 “other free” in 1810 [NC:193]. He was in Wake County in 1849 when he applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution.

Thomas Stewart was born about 1742 in Mecklenburg County, Virginia. He enlisted in Captain Dawson’s Company in Lunenburg County under General Gibson and was at Valley Forge and Guilford Court House. He and his wife Sarah were married by James Yancey of Granville County, North Carolina, in the fall of the year 1791 [M805-772, frame 69]. He was head of a Person County household of 7 “other free” in 1800 [NC:598] and 11 in 1810 [NC:632]. His 30 January 1818 Person County will, proved in May 1818, named his wife Sarah and children [WB 8:77]. His wife Sarah was living in Person County on 4 March 1843 when she received a pension for his services [M805-772, frame 69].

William Stewart was “a Colored man … free born” about 1759 in Brunswick County, Virginia, according to his Revolutionary War pension file. He enlisted in 1777 under Major Hardy Murphy in Northampton County, North Carolina, and marched to West Point and Valley Forge. After the war he returned to Northampton County. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 7 “other free” in 1800 [NC:479]. He moved with his family to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where he had been living from 1814 until 19 May 1835 when he made his pension application. Nancy Scott, a “Colored woman,” who came to Pennsylvania with the Stewart family, testified on his behalf [M805-773, frame 400].

Hezekiah Stringer was in Craven County on 20 March 1787 when he registered his furlough papers before the Justice of the Peace. His papers, dated 26 May 1783, granted him a leave of absence from the 1st North Carolina Regiment until his final discharge [NCGSJ XVI:238]. He was called Kiah Stringer in 1800, head of a New Hanover County household of 5 “other free” [NC:316].

Mingo Stringer served in Sharp’s Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment between 5 May 1781 and 5 April 1782 [Clark, State Records, XVI:1166]. He was head of a Craven County household of 2 “other free” in 1790 [NC:131].

Abraham Sweat served in Raiford’s Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment between 25 April 1781 and 25 April 1782 [Clark, State Records, XVI:1162]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 5 “other free” in 1790 [NC:62], 6 in 1800 [NC:344], and 4 in 1810 [NC:50].

Allen Sweat was about fifty-two years old on 7 June 1818 when he made a declaration in Wake County court to obtain a pension. He stated that he enlisted in Halifax County, North Carolina, about 1782. Exum Scott testified that he had known him since his infancy while living on Scott’s plantation in Roanoke. And Francis Jones testified on his behalf. He later moved to McNairy County, Tennessee, where his wife received a survivor’s pension. She testified that they were married on 28 January 1792 and her husband died 29 March 1844 [M804-2332].

George Sweat received army pay for service to the Revolution [Clark, State Records, XVII:250]. He was taxable on one free poll in Halifax County in 1790 and head of a Halifax County household of 4 “other free” in 1790 [NC:62].

William Sweat was taxable in District 10 of Halifax County in 1782 and head of a household of 1 free male and 3 females in District 8 of Halifax County for the 1786 state census. He received a 640 acre grant for his services in the Revolution [mentioned in Franklin County DB 6:89].

Allen Taborn enlisted in Baker’s Company in the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 20 July 1778 but deserted three days later [Saunders, Colonial and State Records XVI:1173]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 7 “other free” in 1780 [NC:73].

Burrell Taborn was a resident of Nash County in 1781 when he enlisted in Captain Lytle’s Company for twelve months. He was head of a Nash County household of 7 “other free” in 1800 [NC:122], 10 in 1810 [NC:668], and 6 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:445]. He died on 9 January 1842. His children were mentioned in the survivor’s pension application of his son Hardimon [M804-2335, frame 744].

Joel Taborn was living in Nash County in 1776 when he enlisted in the company of Captain Tarrent under Colonel Lytle. “Being a very young person of color” he was first employed as a servant to the officers before being placed in the ranks a short time after his arrival in Charleston. He was discharged in Charleston in 1783. He assigned his right to a 100 acre land warrant to William Cheatham in Northampton County on 29 May 1797. He was a resident of Wake County on 10 February 1821 when he made his declaration in Granville County Court in order to obtain a pension [M804-2335, frame 0772].

William Taborn was living in Granville County in 1778 when Colonel William Taylor and Captain James Saunders requisitioned his wagon and team of horses for use as a baggage wagon for the soldiers. He made an agreement with John Davis to look after his crop in exchange for Davis looking after his wagon. He was later drafted as a soldier and received a pension. He served in South Carolina under Colonel Lytle, who placed him under guard for getting drunk and cursing him. Fowler Jones, Sr., one of the witnesses for his pension application, testified that William served for a while as cook to General Butler. Another witness, Zachariah Hester, testified that he was a “Brother Soldier” with him in the expedition to the Savannah River. Jacob Anderson testified that he lived near him in Granville County when his wagon was requisitioned [M804-2335, frame 0798]. He was listed in Captain Satterwhite’s Company in the Granville County Militia Returns for 1778: 19 years old, 5 feet 8 inches high, Darkish coloured hair & complexion, planter [Mil. TR 4-40 by Granville County Genealogical Society, Granville Connections, vol.1, no.1, 15]. He was head of a Granville County household of 8 “other free” in 1810 [NC:898].

Benjamin Tann received 9 pounds from the controller’s office on 10 June 1783 [N.C. Archives Army Accounts, Specie certificate no. 1859].

Drury Tann enlisted as a private in Hadley’s Company of the 10th Regiment of the North Carolina Continental Line on 1 August 1782, but there was no record of his service [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1175]. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household 4 “other free” in Northampton County in 1790 [NC:74], 3 in Hertford County in 1800 [NC:722], and 2 “free colored” in Southampton County, Virginia, in 1820: a man and woman over 45 years of age. He was taxable in Southampton County as a “free Negro” laborer in 1813 and 1814, living on Arthur Carr’s land in 1820 [PPTL 1807-21, frame 326]. He made an application for a Revolutionary War pension in Southampton County court on 7 March 1834 in which he stated that he had been stolen from his parents when a small boy by persons who planned to sell him into slavery but had been rescued by a magistrate in Wake County, North Carolina.

Ephraim Tann was a private in Baker’s Company. He enlisted on 20 July 1778 for nine months. His heirs received 640 acres for his services in the North Carolina Continental Line [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1173; N.C. Archives file T&C Rev. War Army Accts. Vol III:73, folio 3 & VII:108, folio 3].

James Tann was a soldier who died in the service in Philadelphia during the Revolutionary War. He enlisted on 20 July 1778 and was omitted in 1779 [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1173]. Jesse Boothe, executor of Benjamin Tann’s Nash County will, deposed on 20 June 1821 that James’ rightful heir was Hannah Tann, daughter of his brother Jesse Tann [S.S. 460.1]. She received a land warrant for 640 acres for her uncle’s service [S.S. 460.1, 460.2, 460.3, 460.12].

Joseph Tann served in the Revolution. His heirs received 640 acres for his services in the North Carolina Continental Line.

Arthur Toney, born about 1764 in Dinwiddie County, Virginia, lived there until he was ten years old when he moved to Halifax County, North Carolina. He took the place of his brother John Toney in the Revolutionary War in Warren County and marched to Bacon’s Bridge in South Carolina where he reenlisted. He was not involved in any battles since he was assigned to the baggage wagon. When he returned in 1782, he moved to Caswell County and made his declaration to obtain a pension in Caswell County court fifty years later on 9 October 1832. He was head of a Caswell County household of 10 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:90]. He was in Halifax County on 1 April 1847 when he made another declaration for a pension. His widow, formerly Elizabeth Edwell, born about 1780, was living in Caswell County on 10 November 1854 when she appeared before the Hustings Court in Virginia to obtain a survivor’s pension. She stated that they were married in December 1799 in Caswell County, and her husband died there in his own house on 19 July 1847 [M805-807, frame 582].

John Toney was a “Free Mulatto” added to Wood Jones’ list of tithables for Amelia County on 27 November 1766 [Orders 1766-9, 24]. He enlisted in the 10th Regiment of the North Carolina Continental Line. He fought at the battle of Guilford Courthouse and “ran home and was taken and made to serve to the end of the war.” He died in November 1823 [M805, reel 807, frame 623]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 7 “other free” in 1790 [NC:62], 16 in 1800 [NC:344], 11 in 1810 [NC:51], and 11 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:167].

Pompey Terry enlisted in the 10th Regiment on 1 August 1782 for 18 months [Crow, Black Experience, 102].

Charles Turner made a declaration in Pasquotank County Court on 4 March 1834 to obtain a pension for his service in the North Carolina Continental Line [NCGSJ XVII:160]. He was head of a Pasquotank County household of 4 “other free” in 1790 [NC:29] and 9 in 1810 [NC:933].

Bartlet Tyler was taxable Granville County in 1768 in the list of Robert Harris, head of a household with his unnamed wife and sister Jane, and taxable on two “black” tithes in 1769 [CR 44.701.20]. On 5 August 1778 he complained to the Granville County Court that he was forced into Revolutionary War service on the pretence that he was a vagrant [Owen, Granville County Notes, vol. V].

Asa Tyner, born about 1744, was taxable with his unnamed wife in Bute County in 1771 [CR 015.70001]. She was Keziah Chavis, born about 1742, still taxable in the Granville County household of her father William Chavis in 1764 but not in 1766 [CR 44.701.19]. On 10 November 1778 he was brought into Granville County Court as a vagrant and “delivered to a Continental Officer and to serve as the Law directs” [Minutes 1773-83, 142]. He was listed among the volunteers for nine months service as a Continental soldier from Bute County on 3 September 1778, “Asea Tyner, Place of Abode Bute County, born N.C., 5’8″, 34 years of Age, Dark Fair, Dark Eyes” [NCGSJ XV:109 (N.C. Archives Troop Returns, Box 4)]. His wife Keziah was head of a Granville County household of 4 “other free” in 1800.

Daniel Valentine was the brother of Peter and Polly Valentine according to the declaration of Polly’s children on 21 May 1835 in Halifax County, North Carolina Court. A military land warrant was issued on 3 November 1834 for his service as a soldier under Captain Bradley in the Tenth North Carolina Regiment [M805-820, frame 0119].

Peter Valentine was head of a Chesterfield County household of 7 “other free” in 1810 [VA:1062]. He served in the Revolution and received a warrant for bounty land according to the application for a survivor’s pension which his nephews Daniel and Sarah made while living in Halifax County, North Carolina [M805-820, frame 0119].

Drury Walden was a Revolutionary War pensioner from Northampton County, North Carolina. He made a declaration in Northampton County Court to obtain a pension on 4 September 1832. He stated that he was living in Bute County in 1779 when he was called into the service. He served three tours as a musician and private, the last one in 1781. He marched to Augusta on his first tour and on his second tour made gun carriages for the cannon and canteens for the soldiers. William Hardee, Clergyman, testified that Drury “was for years a preacher of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.” Charles R. Kee, executor of Drury’s will, testified that, “no man; no, not Jas K. Polk himself, is of better moral character [National Archives File R11014]. He was also in the Third Company detached from the Northampton County Regiment in the War of 1812 [N.C. Adjutant General, Muster Rolls of the War of 1812, 20]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 8 other free in 1790 [NC:73], 9 in 1800 [NC:483], 12 in 1810 [NC:752], 11 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:266], and 4 “free colored” in 1830.

John Weaver, born about 1753, was the six-year-old son of “Free Mullattoe” Amey Weaver bound by the Bertie County Court to William Witherington to learn the trade of shoe making in July 1759 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, II:491]. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 3 “other free” in 1810 [NC:750], 5 “free colored” in Hertford County in 1820 [NC:206] and 3 “free colored” in Hertford County in 1830. On 28 November 1823 he testified in Hertford County Court for Evans Archer saying that he was in the same regiment with him, stationed in South Carolina. He made a declaration in Hertford County Court for his own pension on 13 October 1828, stating that he was born about 1752 [M805-845, frame 272].

Arthur Wiggins was born in Bertie County about 1758 according to his pension application. He was living in Bertie County in 1779 when he was drafted in the town of Winton, Hertford County. In his pension application in Bertie County Court on 13 February 1833 he mentioned his brother Matthew [M804-2572, frame 0377]. He was head of a Bertie household of 5 “other free” in 1800 [NC:86], 4 in 1810 [NC:163], and 3 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:114].

Henry Wiggins was a “man of colour” who enlisted for 2-1/2 years on 11 April 1777. He was said to have died on James Island, South Carolina. His land warrant for 640 acres was escheated in 1821 [Crow, Black Experience, 102].

Matthew Wiggins was a “free Mulatto” taxable in the Bertie County list of Cullen Pollock in 1769 and taxable as Matthias in the 1774 list of Samuel Granberry. He was called Mathias Wiggins (a Mulatto) when he married Prissey Tabert, 3 January 1786 Bertie County bond. Matthew was head of an Edgecombe County household of 4 “other free” in 1790 [NC:55]. He died before 13 February 1833 when his brother Arthur applied for a pension in Bertie County Court.

John Wilkinson was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 6 “other free” in 1800 [NC:485] and head of a Halifax County household of 6 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:169]. He was living in Northampton County when he gave Presly Prichard his power of attorney to receive his final settlement certificate for his services in the Revolution [NCGSJ XVIII:99].

John Womble was a carpenter who enlisted in the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 1 June 1779 in Halifax County. He was captured in the siege of Charleston and remained on parole for the remainder of the war. He married his wife Catherine in Edgecombe County in 1798 [M805, reel 883, frame 836]. He was head of an Edgecombe County household of 1 “other free” in 1790 and 11 “free colored” in 1820 [NC:112].

 

Back to NC in the Revolutionary War Home Page© 2005-2011  Diane Siniard
 

Advertisements

Cousin Calculator

This question of relationships gets asked a lot by readers. So the charts and calculator. Have fun and remember if you have no tree but you are looking at your DNA it most likely will not help you much.

PrenticeNet Cousin Calculator

Cousin Terms and Definitions

First Cousin 
Your first cousin is a child of your aunt or uncle. You share one set of grandparents with your first cousin, but you do not have the same parents.

Second Cousin 
Your second cousin is the grandchild of your great-aunt or great-uncle. You share one set of great-grandparents with your second cousin, but you do not have the same grandparents.

Third, Fourth, and Fifth Cousins 
Your third cousin is the great-grandchild of your great-great-aunt or great-great-uncle. You share a set of great-great-grandparents with your third cousin, but do not have the same great-grandparents. Fourth cousins have one set of great-great-great-grandparents, but not the same great-great-grandparents. And so on.

Double Cousins
If two siblings in one family marry two siblings from another family and each couple has a child, the children are double first cousins. The word double in addition to the first cousin term is because they share the same four grandparents. Regular first cousins share only one set of common grandparents, while double first cousins share both sets of grandparents plus all lineal and collateral relatives.

Removed
The relationships of cousins of different generations are explained by using the word “removed”. Cousins who are “once removed” have a one-generation difference. For example, the first cousin of your father is your first cousin, once removed. In that case, your father’s first cousin is one generation younger than your grandparents and you are two generations younger than your grandparents. This one-generation difference is explained by saying that you are cousins “once removed.”. Removed cousin relationships is never measured by age, but only by generation differences.

Twice removed means that there is a two-generation difference between cousins. If you are two generations younger than the first cousin of your grandparent, then the relationship between you and your grandparent’s first cousin are first cousins, twice removed.

Cousin relationships can be any combination of first, second, third and so on, with once removed, twice removed, and so on. A genealogy program will calculate exact family relationships in your family tree for both blood relatives and relatives by marriage.

Do you look like your relatives, use Family Search Facial Software.

Access August 27, 2018
Do you look like your relatives? Use our facial recognition software to find out.
If you have a Family Search Account you will be able to use this services.
Upload a Selfie
Upload a Family Portrait
Compare

Forgot your FamilySearch Account information?
You can reset your password or go here to recover your username.

A service provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
© 2018 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.
50 E. North Temple Street, Salt Lake City, Utah 84150 United StatesFamilySearch Rights and Use Information (Updated 2016-09-01) | Privacy Policy (Updated 2014-03-18)

New Post on American Ancestors Database News

We offer this news post from Amercian Ancestors to help you research your ancestors who may have been living in the New England States. This may help to bridge the gap between what we think we know and the unknown for us to discover. I have found relatives living in the New England States as Freeman and Slaves. We travel the trail where ever it leads us.

 

New post on American Ancestors Database News

11 new Norwich sketches in Early Vermont Settlers, 1700-1784

by Molly Rogers

Summer in Vermont

Today we’re announcing 11 new sketches in Early Vermont Settlers, 1700-1784.  We’ve also updated three older sketches.  This study project by Scott Andrew Bartley is a work in progress, focusing on head of families in pre-Revolutionary War Vermont.  So far he has focused on Windsor and Windham counties.  This addition (including the updates) adds 1,088 new records and 4,352 new names.  The new sketches are listed below:

Baldwin, Daniel (Norwich)
Burton, Jacob (Norwich)
Burton, Josiah (Norwich)
Carpenter, Simeon (Norwich)
Hatch, John (Norwich)
Hatch, Joseph (Norwich)
Hopson, John (Norwich)
Huntington, James (Norwich)
Murdock, Thomas (Norwich)
Sargent, John (Norwich)
Smith, Phillip (Norwich)

Three updated sketches:

Burton, Elisha (Norwich)
Neff, Thomas (Randolph)
Wright, Benjamin (Hartford)

Please note: This database is available to Individual-level and above NEHGS members only. Consider membership.

Molly Rogers | August 22, 2018 at 11:28 am | Categories: Uncategorized | URL: https://wp.me/p8jE0N-nC

Civil War Slave Compensation Claims

Civil War Slave Compensation Claims in Compiled Military Service Records of U.S. Colored Troops

During the Civil War, an act of Congress allowed loyal slave owners in border states (where slavery was still legal after the Emancipation Proclamation) whose slaves enlisted or were drafted into the U.S. military to file a claim against the Federal government for loss of the slave’s services.  Since each slave compensation claim was based on the service of a specific soldier, a copy of the claim’s paperwork was placed in that soldier’s compiled military service record. The regiments of U.S. Colored Troops that have a large number of these claims are the regiments formed in the border-states (Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri) or in neighboring states.

This index includes troops who served the following regiments:

  • Artillery—1st, 4th, 8th, 12th, and 13th Heavy Artillery Regiments, U.S. Colored Troops
  • Cavalry—5th and 6th Cavalry Regiments, U.S. Colored Troops
  • Infantry—4th, 7th, 18th and 19th Infantry Regiments, U.S. Colored Troops

See Guide to Civil War Slave Compensation Claims in Compiled Military Service Records of U.S. Colored Troops for more information about these records.

For more information about specific records found in this index, please contact the History and Genealogy Department at genealogy@slcl.org.

Enslaved Project Michigan State University

Access 8/19/2018

Enslaved.org.

In recent years, a growing number of archives, databases, and collections that organize and make sense of records of enslavement have become freely and readily accessible for scholarly and public consumption. This proliferation of projects and databases presents a number of challenges:

  • Disambiguating and merging individuals across multiple datasets is nearly impossible given their current, siloed nature;
  • Searching, browsing, and quantitative analysis across projects is extremely difficult;
  • It is often difficult to find projects and databases;
  • There are no best practices for digital data creation;
  • Many projects and datasets are in danger of going offline and disappearing.

In response to these challenges, Matrix: The Center for Digital Humanities & Social Sciences at Michigan State University, in partnership with the MSU Department of History and scholars at multiple institutions, has begun work on Enslaved: People of the Historic Slave Trade, a constellation of software and services built to address these challenges. Enslaved’s primary focus is people—individuals who were enslaved, owned slaves, or participated in slave trading.

Enslaved International Conference March 8-9, 2019

Enslaved Conference coming March 8-9, 2019!

In March 2019, Michigan State will host an international conference, “Enslaved: Peoples of the Historic Slave Trade.” For more information, see our Call for Papers below! Enslaved: Peoples of the Historic Slave Trade Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan…

Read More

Sissieretta Jones

Overlooked No More: Sissieretta Jones, a Soprano Who Shattered Racial Barriers

She was the first African-American woman to headline a concert at Carnegie Hall, but she didn’t care for her stage name, “the Black Patti,” which compared her to a white diva.

Read more: New York Times – http://rejuvenationmedia.com/overlooked-no-more-sissieretta-jones-a-soprano-who-shattered-racial-barriers/

Access 8/19/18

%d bloggers like this: