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What is the difference between genetics and Genomics

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Where are Argentina’s black people?

We are one, aren’t we?

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Life Stories

It’s About Us

African American Genealogy DNA is about bringing unity, dismantling ethnic division, separation of a human being for no real reason except learn behavior. So “Life Stories” is about we are one family of humanoids on earth. Inspiring others to create a place without restrictions or a sense of bondage by religion, color, ethnicity or other change that prohibit real communication and living.

Genetics is one path to enlightenment to understanding who we are, how we got to be, where we came from and how we became to be. In other words, the journey is from Africa and across the world. We migrated and planted the human seeds ever place on earth. Reunification of man and women.

Ancestry Circles, Gen 2.0 and Family Tree are bridging the gap, seeing the world of humans as a whole not separated. Continue to learn from each other, do not let traditional ethnicity block us from the human tree.

https://www.facebook.com/LifeStories.Goalcast/

Nominations for AAHGS National Awards

From: Baba Gene Stephenson, President@aahgs.org

May 18, 2018

 

Hotep AAHGS Family,

 

Here we are, at this special time of the year, when we have an opportunity with confidence, to nominate persons whom we consider both worthy of acknowledging their special contributions to the genealogy and historical venues of ancestral research, and have been a representative gold mine to the community.  The iconic musician Charlie “Bird” Parker mused NOW IS THE TIME, which appropriately fits the exclusivity of those nominated.  Let’s not allow the time to pass us by.  Let’s set if off, and get these nominations started right…quickly!

 

Sooo, the Afro-American Historical & Genealogical Society, Inc. (AAHGS) is currently seeking nominations for its National Awards. Only financial members of AAHGS may submit nominations. All nominations must be documented on the AAHGS Awards Nomination Form and submitted via email to Awards@aahgs.org  or electronically on the 2018 Awards Online Submission Form.

 

See the AAHGS website under National Awards Program for additional details on the awards and for the nomination form.

 

Awards must be submitted no later than June 1st.

Nominations may be submitted for one or more of the following awards.  However, a submitter cannot nominate the same person for multiple awards.

 

James Dent Walker Award

The James Dent Walker Award is the highest award that can be bestowed by AAHGS upon a person who has exhibited distinguished accomplishments through a significant and measurable contribution to the research, documentation, and/or preservation of African American history. Membership in AAHGS is not required. [Plaque, Honorary life membership, brass membership card]

 

Paul Edward Sluby, Sr. /Jean Sampson-Scott, Meritorious Achievement Awards

The Paul Edward Sluby, Sr. and Jean Sampson-Scott Meritorious Achievement Awards are the second highest awards that can be bestowed by AAHGS upon an organization(s) or person(s) who has exhibited distinguished performance through a significant and measurable contribution to African American history and/or genealogy within the past two years. No more than two awards in this category will be given annually. Membership in AAHGS is not required. [Plaque]

 

Marsha M. Greenlee, History Award

The Marsha M. Greenlee History Award is presented to a person or group for outstanding and measurable achievements in the field of African American history (e.g., history, anthropology, etc). The nomination will be judged on scholarship, presentation and originality. This nomination should result from publication of a book, dissertation, or other manuscript produced by the recipient. Only members of AAHGS and affiliated groups are eligible for this award. [Plaque]

 

Distinguished National Service Award

The Distinguished National Service Award recognizes an AAHGS member who has provided extraordinary, dedicated service of direct benefit to the AAHGS organization at the national level.  Such service may be for a single act or for continuing service, which far exceeds expectations in AAHGS national leadership in achieving the goals of the organization. [Plaque, Honorary life membership]

 

Elizabeth Clark-Lewis, Genealogy Award

The Elizabeth Clark-Lewis Genealogy Award is presented to a person for original research in support of African American genealogy. The nomination will be judged on scholarly and original research and must document the genealogy of African American ancestors. Only members of AAHGS and affiliated groups are eligible for this award. [Plaque]

Chapter of the Year Award

This award is bestowed on an AAHGS chapter who has made outstanding contributions to the AAHGS mission to preserve African American history and genealogy through sponsorship of quality chapter programs, activities, and services over the past year.   This award is not necessarily presented each year. [Plaque]

On-The-Spot Award

The On-The-Spot Award is presented to a Chapter member for a recent, specific, measurable accomplishment, which impacts or contributes to AAHGS mission and goals. Only financial members of AAHGS chapters are eligible for this award. [Payment of AAHGS national membership dues for the next calendar year]

The Certificate of Appreciation

The Certificate of Appreciation is presented to an individual or team who has made a contribution to AAHGS or its principles and deserves a token of thanks. The Certificate will result from an act(s) performed within two years of its presentation.  Membership in AAHGS is not required.

AAHGS President’s Award

The AAHGS President’s Award is presented to a member who has rendered outstanding Service to AAHGS for a minimum of five (5) years at a personal sacrifice of time.  This nominee has, in addition, contributed immeasurably to the Society’s growth and well-being.  Such service may be for a single continuing activity, or for a variety of activities.The President alone is the sole selector of the recipient of this award. [Plaque, Honorary life membership]

 

Asante Sana

J.F.S. match to me, predictive relationship 2nd cousin and we share Great Grandparents
23andMe match 2nd cousin on 14 markers, we share 93 relatives together, haplogroup for me L2ala2 and for J.F.S. L2ale
Here is the response to my inquiry:
Good day, sir. There is no Saluda Slade, in this family tree. What i have discovered is the males and females have given birth to children without ever notifying their spouses. This occured from males and females. It appears females had cgildren without notifying their future spouse. It also appears males had children, though married, with other women, while married. So far, tge females did not produce progeny, while married, howebwr males, did. That explaines tge DNA segment matches of 3.8% and lower. I have been contacted by white families as well and are disghusted to know I am their NEICE, AUNT and 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th cousin and that i am lredominantky of SubSaharan descent. They were comoletwky unaware that their father, though married to thwir mothwr fathered a black child. THIS CONNECTION IS ON THE PATERNAL HAPLOTYPE AND THE MALE HAD SEX WITH AN UNKNOWN FEMALE AND PRODUCED A CHILD. When I shared your email with the remainder of my family, they prefer that they not open a can of worms. I shall comply with tge majority of this famiky and any i fidelities that resukted in offspring shall remain unknown. How does it go, till dwath do we part. Thank you for informing us, our paternal great- great -great-grandfather had a relationship he didnt want to disclose. He is dead. Been dead for 3 generations and he may not have know of the conception. Since he didnt know, and his son dindt know, and his grand son didny know and his great grand aon disnt know and his great, great, grrat grand son dinsy know, none kf yhis current family deaires to knkw what he did, before he married his wife. Sir, i shall reacy as my white 1sy cousin. Take this informayion with you, yo your grave. It shall remain undisclosed. God bless. Do nkt contacts me further. I will.not respond. Best wishes.
This is verbatim without any changes to the email.
This a confirmation of the relationship and does not deter me from entering the ancestor information in the family tree. The same information is in Gedmatch and triangulations confirms the match.
As long as you have validation, recorded proof in records just move on, we can never change how one thinks but we certainly can continue our journey finding our ancestors.

Researchers Search for Disease Makers Linked to Diverse Populations

Researchers search for disease markers linked to diverse populations

Summary:
As we observe Minority Health Month, scientists are finding clues that may lead to improved treatment of diseases that disproportionately affect minorities.

In the emerging world of personalized medicine, researchers are furiously looking for disease markers specific to minority populations, and they have already made some promising discoveries. The clues they are gathering, the scientists said, could lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of chronic diseases, such as asthma and heart disease, that disproportionately affect minorities, as well as eventually helping reduce longstanding health disparities.

This is encouraging news, especially as we observe National Minority Health Month in April.

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is playing a key role in the quest to identify these so-called biomarkers, which show up in many forms, from blood proteins to genes. One recent NHLBI supported study, for example, identified a genetic marker that may help explain why the commonly used asthma drug albuterol is not as effective in African-American and Puerto Rican children as it is in European American or Mexican children. Further study of this chemical clue could lead to improved asthma therapies for all populations.

Another study, also funded by NHLBI, found that a substance called D-dimer, a byproduct of the breakdown of fibrin that is involved in blood clotting, could provide a useful marker for identifying stroke and heart disease risk in African-Americans. The substance is found at higher levels in African-Americans than in people of European ancestry, the researchers say. The researchers also confirmed that higher D-dimer levels were associated with sickle cell trait.

Both the lung and heart disease studies were made possible by genome-sequencing tools provided by NHLBI’s Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed program) Program. The program focuses on collecting and identifying genetic biomarkers from clinical study participants with heart, lung, blood, or sleep disorders. And it places special emphasis on collecting genetic data that represents the racial and ethnic diversity of the American population.

Diverse American population

“We’re elated about these early findings,” said Cashell Jaquish, Ph.D., a genetic epidemiologist at NHLBI and a researcher in the TOPMed program. “But we’re only scratching the surface of what could be a treasure trove of biomarkers, particular in minority populations that have not been sufficiently represented in previous health studies.”

Jaquish added that by including many people from different racial and ethnic backgrounds in the study, researchers will be able to understand better how genetic variations influence disease risk.

The good news, she said, is that the studies extend well beyond lung and heart disease. The TOPMed program is also looking for biomarkers related to high blood pressure, COPD, sleep apnea, obesity and atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat).

Begun in 2014, the program has sequenced more than 100,000 genomes (gene collections) using data from patients who have volunteered to participate in NHLBI clinical studies, including the Framingham Heart Study, Jackson Heart Study and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. The inclusion of these and other well-studied, multi-ethnic populations has made it easier to find biomarkers that are clinically relevant to all populations. And recent improvements in genetic technology have made sequencing faster. (Complementing TOPMed is the All of Us Research Program, a new cutting-edge effort to collect data from 1 million or more people in the United States to uncover biomarkers that can help deliver precision medicine for improved health.)

Esteban Burchard, M.D., M.P.H., a physician-scientist at the University of California, San Francisco, and the senior author of the asthma pharmacogenetics study, said the TOPMed program is “an important first step toward implementing precision medicine in all populations.”

In his asthma study, for example, Burchard and his colleagues collected genetic data from nearly 1,500 children across a wide range of ethnic backgrounds. The children had either a very high or very low drug response to albuterol. The researchers identified new genetic markers that could be used to predict which children are most likely to respond poorly to the drug. Among the top associated genes identified in the low-response group was a variant in the NFKB1 gene that is more prevalent in people with African ancestry. A better understanding of this variant could lead scientists to predict who will respond well to current and future asthma medications, the researcher said.

Burchard said that kind of discovery has value for everyone involved: “Racial and ethnic diversity in clinical and biomedical research leads to better science and improved clinical outcomes for all of us.”

A version of this blog was previously published in NHLBI News.

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Genetics: Skin Color and Race

Skin color and ‘race’: Genetics reveal complicated relationship

| | December 7, 2017

For much of recorded history, skin color has been loaded with powerful social meaning. Skin color plays a major part in how we define race. It also plays a significant role in racism. New studies of the genetics of skin color, though, have begun to shed light on how wrong those assumptions about the relationship between race and skin color really are.

In a new study of indigenous southern African people published … in the journal Cell, researchers … report that the number of genes involved in skin pigmentation increase in number—and therefore also complexity—the closer they reside to the equator.

[C]olor lines are, in essence, meaningless. Our skin color is the result of many, many different genes which work together in different combinations to produce different colors of skin. Many of those genes are shared across racial, cultural, and geographic boundaries.

These new studies of skin color also suggest a second theme: In genetics, the vast majority of data has been gathered from Northern Eurasian populations, and that in turn has created a biased and incomplete portrait of how the genetics of things like skin color really work.

[Editor’s note: Read full study

Read full, original post: How the Genetics of Skin Color Challenges Antiquated Ideas About Race

forwarded from the Genetic Literacy Project arch 12, 2018
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