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Black and White Southern Families in Antebellum Plantation Records

 

 

The North Carolina Genealogy Society Proudly Presents… “Black and White Southern Families in Antebellum Plantation Records” featuring Ari Wilkins
The North Carolina Genealogical Society, Inc.

North Carolina Genealogical Society

The North Carolina Genealogical Society is delighted to present:
Ari Wilkins“Black and White Southern Families in Antebellum Plantation Records”
A LIVE webinar on 7 March 2018, 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm EST

This live webinar is available to NCGS members only. You must be logged in to access registration.The handout for this presentation will be posted on the NCGS website at least one week prior to the webinar. On the top menu, under Education & Events, select Webinars to go to the main webinars page. The box at the top right of that page has a link to “Member Webinar Handouts”, which is arranged in alphabetical order.

About the Webinar:

The Southern Antebellum Plantation Records are an invaluable resource to Southern and African American researchers. This extensive collection encompasses business and personal papers from numerous slaveholding families of the South. For white Southern families, the collection can uncover decades of genealogical history along with details such as the dynamics of personal relationships, communication, and the entanglements of associated families. For African American research, these records can potentially list enslaved persons by name and include other significant information such as family relationships, dates of birth and death, and bills of sale.
This presentation will demonstrate the breadth of the collection, how to navigate and apply the records to personal research.

About the Speaker:
Ari Wilkins photo   Ari Wilkins, a graduate of Louisiana State University, has been actively researching family history since 1998. Ari worked with the esteemed genealogist, Dr. James Rose, for many years on his final project Generations: The WPA Ex-Slave Narrative Database. She is the owner of the genealogical consulting company, Black Genesis. Ms. Wilkins also works as a contributor for Proquest’s African American Heritage database.
Ms. Wilkins has spoken nationally at the National Genealogical Society, Federation of Genealogical Societies, Texas State Genealogical Society, Ohio Genealogical Society, Samford Institute of Genealogical and Historical Research, American Library Association, and a multitude of local societies.
Ari has been a Library Associate at Dallas Public Library since 2007. She teaches a series of basic research classes using popular genealogical websites. She specializes in African American research.

To register for the live webinar, look under Upcoming Events on the NCGS home page. You will need to log in as a member in order to register.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.
This event is sponsored through GoToWebinar, and will be viewable via the link sent to you after registration. It will not be on the NCGS web site. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. If you use an email program that uses Sender Lists to allow receipt of email, especially Earthlink or Mindspring, you may need to add @ncgenealogy.org to your list of “approved senders” to receive email from NCGS. Remember to include the @ in front of ncgenealogy!
Webinar Viewing Options
  • Live webinars, the post-webinar Q&A sessions, and the accompanying handouts are free for NCGS members.
  • Recordings of the webinars are available to members within a few weeks of the live session.
  • A public replay of the webinar will occur on a future date that will be published on the website and in the NCGS News.

________________________________

 

Ken Trantham

Publicty Committee Chair

publicity@ncgenealogy.org

 

 

Copyright © 2018 North Carolina Genealogical Society, Inc., All rights reserved.

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Manumission Records of Slaves in Jamaica

Manumission Records of Slaves in Jamaica

Resource: Genealogia Nuestra – Our Ancestors access 2/11/2018

One of the terms that many of us that descend from enslaved ancestors know is the word manumission.  Manumission is the term used when referencing the freedom of those that were enslaved. The term is used when individuals managed to attain their freedom, whether through the slaveholder freeing them or through the enslaved person purchasing their freedom or a family member do thing for them.

While many of us would like to find these records, it isn’t an easy task. It becomes harder for those of us who have ancestors that come from the Caribbean. Many records have been destroyed or lost due to fire, hurricanes, the humidity, and the insects that enjoy eating through the records.

Many times when books were found to be in poor condition, they would wind up being burned as trash. Preservation is not a priority when many face struggles in feeding their families and maintaining homes.

While records are disappearing, many have taken on the mission of preserving these records, which helps many in the genealogy world discover records that were not previously available to them. Many of these preservation projects are taken on via grants through universities around the globe.

One such project is based out of the United Kingdom but easily accessible in the USA. While the project has identified that there are 70 registers but the first 4 volumes are missing. The volumes that are available are Volumes 5 through 12, contain people who were manumitted in the following parishes across Jamaica covering the time period of 1747 through 1838:
  • Clarendon
  • Hanover
  • Kingston
  • Manchester
  • Port Royal
  • Portland
  • St. Andrew
  • St. Ann
  • St. Catherine
  • St. David
  • St. Dorothy
  • St. Elizabeth
  • St. George
  • St. James
  • St. Mary
  • St. Thomas in the East
  •  St. Thomas in the Vale
  • Trelawny
  • Vere
  • Westmoreland

The volumes are as follows and if browsing from a computer, they will open in a new tab:

Emancipation Park, Kingston, Jamaica

 

Manumission Records of Slaves in Jamaica

Michigan State University Grant to House a Massive Slave Trade Database

 

Published: Jan. 9, 2018

MSU USES $1.5M MELLON FOUNDATION GRANT TO BUILD MASSIVE SLAVE TRADE DATABASE

Contact(s): Andy Henion, Dean Rehberger, Walter Hawthorne, Ethan Watrall, Rebecca Jensen

Michigan State University, supported by nearly $1.5 million from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, will create a unique online data hub that will change the way scholars and the public understand African slavery.

By linking data collections from multiple universities, the website will allow people to search millions of pieces of slave data to identify enslaved individuals and their descendants from a central source. Users can also run analyses of enslaved populations and create maps, charts and graphics.

The project, called “Enslaved: The People of the Historic Slave Trade,” is funded by a $1.47 million grant from the Mellon Foundation.

“’Enslaved’ brings new digital tools and analytical approaches to the study of African slavery and the Atlantic slave trade,” said project co-investigator Walter Hawthorne, professor and chair of MSU’s Department of History. “By linking data compiled by some of the world’s foremost historians, it will allow scholars and the public to learn about individuals’ lives and to draw new, broad conclusions about processes that had an indelible impact on the world.”

Dean Rehberger, director of Matrix: The Center for Digital Humanities and Social Sciences at MSU, will lead the project along with Hawthorne and Ethan Watrall, associate director of Matrix and assistant professor of anthropology.

This project, which will take 18 months, is the first phase of a multi-phase plan. In phase one, MSU and partners will develop a proof-of-concept to show data can be linked across eight well-established online databases, including the collection at MSU’s Matrix.

In addition to Matrix – one of the premier digital humanities centers – MSU has the top-ranked African history graduate program in the nation, according to U.S. News & World Report.

“’Enslaved’ reaffirms Michigan State University’s longstanding commitment to Africa-centered research,” Watrall said, “and to creating tools and digital experiences that engage researchers, students and the public in critical questions about our collective past, culture and heritage.”

The partner projects in phase one are “African Origins and Voyages: The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database” led by David Eltis, professor emeritus, Emory University, and Paul Lachance; “The Slave Societies Digital Archive” led by Jane Landers, Vanderbilt University; “Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro-Latin American Biography” and “Dictionary of African Biography and African American National Biography” led by Henry Louis Gates Jr., Steven Niven and Abby Wolf, Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University; “Freedom Narratives” led by Paul Lovejoy, York University; “Legacies of British Slave-Ownership” led by Keith McClelland, University College, London; and “The Liberated Africans Project” led by Henry Lovejoy, University of Colorado Boulder; and “Slave Biographies” led by Daryle Williams, University of Maryland.

The funding follows a $19,450 Mellon grant for project planning.

“We and our partners value the support of the Mellon Foundation,” Rehberger said. “In bringing together data from a number of highly successful projects, we have the opportunity from many small threads of data to weave together lives of enslaved individuals once thought lost to history.”

Geno 2 Video on DNA

https://player.theplatform.com/p/ngs/genogeno-embed-playergeno-embed-playerembed-player/select/media/KMhGi9j4V_s0?feedParams=byGuid%3D00000144-b6e8-d540-a5d6-ffe90c5b0000&autoPlay=true&t=1

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/51016.John_Henrik_Clarke

John Henrik ClarkeJohn Henrik Clarke > Quotes

 

John Henrik Clarke quotes – These are some of my favorite quotes

“Powerful people cannot afford to educate the people that they oppress, because once you are truly educated, you will not ask for power. You will take it.”
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/51016.John_Henrik_Clarke

 

“Whoever is in control of the hell in your life, is your devil.”

“Racists will always call you a racist when you identify their racism. To love yourself now – is a form of racism. We are the only people who are criticized for loving ourselves. and white people think when you love yourself you hate them. No, when I love myself they become irrelevant to me.”
“Powerful people can not afford to educate the people they oppress… because once you are truly educated, you will not ASK for power you will TAKE it.”
“History is not everything, but it is a starting point. History is a clock that people use to tell their political and cultural time of day. It is a compass they use to find themselves on the map of human geography. It tells them where they are, but more importantly, what they must be.”
“I only debate my equals. All others, I teach.” The best of all.

Assistant Professor of African-American History – Georgia Southern Univeristy

New Position in African-American History at
Georgia Southern University

Assistant Professor of African-American History—Search #67479
College of Arts and Humanities/Department of History

The Department of History in the College of Arts and Humanities invites applications and nominations for the position of Assistant Professor of African-American History. This position will be located on the Statesboro campus.

In January 2017, the University System of Georgia Board of Regents voted to consolidate Armstrong State University and Georgia Southern University. The new, 27,000-student university will be named Georgia Southern University with campuses in Savannah, Statesboro, and Hinesville. The expected timeline for the first entering class will be fall 2018. Complete details are available at http://consolidation.georgiasouthern.edu/.

Within this setting, the Department of History offers Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts degrees in history and a graduate certificate in Public History. The department has 38 faculty members with diverse fields of expertise. The average upper-division class size is 25 students, ensuring that students receive one-on-one attention and develop strong working relationships with faculty. The Assistant Professor of African-American History will contribute to the Department’s mission of teaching, research, and service in the classroom, the community, and the profession.

Position Description. Reporting to the department chair, the Assistant Professor of African-American History requires teaching, advisement, research, and service responsibilities. The successful candidate will regularly teach core courses in the history of the United States required of all Georgia Southern University students, courses required for the major, and a variety of upper-division courses in his or her field. In addition to pursuing an active research agenda, the successful candidate is expected to advise students and contribute to departmental governance. The position is an academic 10 month, tenure-track appointment, and the salary is competitive and commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Required Qualifications:
• Earned PhD in History with specialty in African-American history by August 1, 2018
• Ability to teach courses in African-American history in different chronological eras
• Ability to teach survey courses in the history of the United States, the undergraduate historical methods course, senior seminar, and graduate seminars
• Must be authorized to work in the United States for the duration of employment without assistance from the institution

Preferred Qualifications:
• College or university teaching experience (part-time experience is permissible)

Screening of applications begins January 19, 2018, and continues until the position is filled. The preferred position starting date is August 1, 2018. A complete application consists of a letter addressing the qualifications cited above; a curriculum vitae; an article-length writing sample, and three professional letters of recommendation. Other documentation may be requested. Only complete applications and applications submitted electronically will be considered. Finalists will be required to submit to a background investigation. Applications and nominations should be sent to:
Dr. Jonathan Bryant, Search Chair, Search #67479
Department of History
Georgia Southern University
P. O. Box 8054
Statesboro GA 30460-8054
Electronic mail: history@georgiasouthern.edu
Telephone: 912-478-4478

More information about the institution is available through http://www.georgiasouthern.edu Georgia Southern University seeks to recruit individuals who are committed to working in diverse academic and professional communities and who are committed to excellence in teaching, scholarship, and professional service within the University and beyond. The names of applicants and nominees, vitae, and other non-evaluative information may be subject to public inspection under the Georgia Open Records Act. Georgia Southern University is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity institution. Individuals who need reasonable accommodations under the ADA to participate in the search process should contact the Vice Provost.

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