My Heritage Records Collection Free for the U.S., U.K. and Ireland, Canada, and Nordic Countries for One Week

Record Week: Search One Billion Census Records for Free!

In celebration of our recent milestone — surpassing 8 billion historical records on SuperSearch — we’re happy to announce that we’re making all of our major census collections from the U.S., U.K. and Ireland, Canada, and Nordic countries free for all users for one week!


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Starting on Monday, August 14, and for a period of one week, no Data subscription will be required, and you can search through this treasure trove of census records for free. That’s 94 collections, containing over 1 billion census records!

With our earliest census records dating as far back as 1657, and the latest ones extending until 1940, these records are an excellent way to learn more about the lives of your ancestors and to add details to your family tree.

What can census records reveal about your family?

Census records contain valuable information just waiting to be discovered. They provide a unique view into the lives of your ancestors at the time of the census, making them a basic foundation of your family history research.

Each record typically includes details such as the names of household members, ages, places of birth, residence, occupation, immigration, citizenship details, marriage information, military service and more. Some countries recorded religious affiliation as well.

Used by governments worldwide to enumerate populations, in the world of genealogy, census records can reveal information about the daily lives of your ancestors that can be added to your family tree. Families can be traced from each census over the years, and often from location to location throughout the country.

Census records can also lead to new connections and relatives. You may be searching for one ancestor and discover additional family members or friends living in the same household whom you knew nothing about.

Which records are free on MyHeritage?

Countries
US

U.K. & Ireland
Canada

Sweden

Finland

Denmark

Number of census records 700,465,273 213,519,384 28,167,687 46,583,546 33,428,981 62,057,547
Years covered 1790 – 1940 1801 – 1911 1825 – 1911 1880 – 1920 1657 – 1915 1850 – 1930
Exclusive to MyHeritage Sweden Household Examination Books, 1880-1920 Finland Church Census and Pre-Confirmation Books, 1657-1915 Many of the Danish Censuses
Link to search Search U.S. Census Records for Free Search U.K. and Ireland Census Records for Free Search Canada Census Records for Free Search Sweden Census Records for Free Search Finland Census Records for Free Search Denmark Census Records for Free

Conclusion

To celebrate our 8 billion records milestone, searching and viewing all of our major census collections is completely free for the week of Aug 14th until Aug 20. This covers more than one billion census records from the U.S., U.K., Ireland, Canada, Sweden, Finland, Uand Denmark. It is available to users of MyHeritage as well as people who have never used MyHeritage before.

A MyHeritage Data subscription is still required to view records from other collections, and for saving records to your family tree or confirming Record Matches with any collection.

Don’t miss the opportunity to explore one billion census records for free. If you haven’t used MyHeritage before, this is a perfect opportunity to give it a try.

Enjoy!

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DNA Test Options, Indigenous African Results and More

DNA Test Options, Indigenous African Results and More

DNAtestedafricans.org for further information. DNAtestedafricans.org is not a testing company and does not suggest any of the companies listed in this article. We offer a connection to purchase DNA kits, but it is your decision based on what you want to test for ancestry. The top three testing companies based on company reputation, services offered, testing methods, software grade, research and scientific evidence, CLIA and FDA compliance (US based) customer reviews, price, customer service and return policy.

#1. CRI Genetics (Cellular Research Institute)

#2. Family Tree DNA

#3 Living DNA Your Ancestry

for further reading go to http://www.geneticsdigest.com/best_ancestry_genealogy_dna_test

 

DNA Test can be done at 12, 25, 37, 67 or 111 markers. I recommend the 67-marker test, it gives you the best results for your money.

For more information or questions contact: DNAtestedafricans.org or africanamericangenealogydna.com

August 28, 2017

African Greetings Family!

   We hope you are all doing well.  Let’s start with a video of brother Saad Tafida.  He is an Indigenous African that tested to learn about his ancestry and to find his family in the Diaspora.  He is Fulani.  (He will tell you more about that on the video so we don’t want to spoil it).

   As it turns out, he is my eldest daughter’s DNA match.  She is able to watch these videos and learn more about a line of her culture and for that, we thank Saad tremendously!  We need more like him to share and explore with us.

Here are his results

He then downloaded his DNA raw data from the website that he tested with.  Then he uploaded to Gedmatch.com He speaks about that in his video.  He found more relatives that NEVER knew their ancestry.

 He uploaded the DNA Raw data to a few websites to find more family.  Click here to see how to do it.   https://www.dnatestedafricans.org/single-post/2017/07/13/Finding-More-DNA-Cousins-for-FREE

BE ENCOURAGED!!  More Indigenous Africans are testing and are looking for us as well too!!  

Now, here is some info on the current sale prices for a few major DNA testing companies.  You can click on each image to go to the website.  So now, let’s talk about the tests.

My Heritage DNA Test Kit $69.00

 

 

 

 

 

Everyone has asked, how do I get started on my DNA testing journey. This is a great place to start. Save this note because it is very useful to return to in the future.. Please read below.

We are NOT a DNA testing company. We do NOT sell DNA tests or profit from the sales of any tests. You must purchase the DNA test on your own. We simply explain what is available for YOU to research and determine what works for you. The information is provided by those of us that have DNA tested with EACH of the companies listed below.

We are a community of Volunteers focused on the ACRO concept. ACRO means African Culture and Reconciliation Organization. We coordinate cultural reception and integration via language classes, naming ceremonies and other enriching events after you have received your results.

We facilitate reconciliation of the DNA Tested African Diaspora and their African ethnic groups of ancestry. We provide you with 3rd party tools for YOU to research so you can determine which DNA Testing company and /or 3rd party tools for family tree building are most useful to you. We provide helpful templates for initial communications with your DNA matches as well as methods on how to get the most out of your test results.

 

Here is a good starting point to Research your AtDNA, MtDNA and the male YDNA. Please see the chart below.

Green is the autosomal DNA that can be tested by Ancestry, FTDNA Myheritage, and 23andme (they also provide DNA matches)

Blue is the YDNA that can be tested by FTDNA’s YDNA test (they provide DNA matches) and African Ancestry (they do NOT provide DNA matches)

Red is the MtDNA that can be tested by FTDNA’s Mt DNA test (they provide DNA matches) and African Ancestry (they do NOT provide DNA matches)

23andMe DBA Test Kit

“The information …..is meant to provide a very simple explanation of your Y-DNA and MtDNA Ancestry used for genealogical purposes. Scientists estimate that the total amount of Y-DNA of a man is less than 1% and the total amount of MtDNA in either a man or a woman is less than 1%. It is important to understand that after taking a Y-DNA and an MtDNA test, the majority of everyone’s DNA remains untested and it is called Autosomal DNA, with another 5% of a female’s DNA or 2 1/2% of a male’s DNA being x-chromosomal DNA. In a man this would mean roughly 95.5% of his DNA is Autosomal and in a woman that figure would be roughly 94%. “

Click here or copy and paste ~~ > https://phillipsdnaproject.com/faq-… ~~

Source: https://phillipsdnaproject.com/faq-sections/312-your-total-dna-makeup

UPDATE: We have been advised that African Ancestry does not do the Admix test anymore. Please check with their website to confirm.

Subscribe at www.dnatestedafricans.org

1. http://www.ancestry.com/ $79 Autosomal test ( saliva ) that analyses DNA from all of the contributors of your DNA. Both males and females can take this test. They test 700,000 markers !! Your DNA is tested 40 times and they provide you with percentages of your ancestry and a list of DNA matches that you can contact. You can research with those DNA matches to determine if they match on your mother’s side or your father’s side of the family. The DNA kit is mailed to you, you provide a small sample of saliva and follow the instructions to activate the kit. It takes about 6 to 8 weeks to receive a email from ancestry notifying you that your results are in. Sign into your ancestry account and explore your results.

You can download your DNA raw data from ancestry and upload it to Gedmatch.com ( https://www.gedmatch.com/login1.php ) for FREE to find more DNA matches. This is a website that allows us that have tested at FTDNA.com, 23andme.com, Wegene.com, and Ancestry.com , to upload there to find more family. And yes! It is FREE.

You can also upload your DNA raw data to https://www.familytreedna.com/ for FREE.

Limitations of Ancestry: This test will not tell you the African ethnic groups that you share ancestry with. However, you may find African DNA matches that can tell you their ethnic group(s) and where they come from. Also when you upload to Gedmatch, you may find African matches that have also uploaded there.

www.ancestry.com

Ancestry.com Results of an African American

 

 

 

2. https://www.23andme.com/ $99 Autosomal test ( saliva ) that analyses DNA from all of the contributors of your DNA. Both males and females can take this test. They provide you with percentages of your ancestry and a list of DNA matches that you can contact. You can research with those DNA matches to determine if they match on your mother’s side or your father’s side of the family. The DNA kit is mailed to you, you provide a small sample of saliva and follow the instructions to activate the kit. Check with 23andme to determine the current wait time for their test results. Once you receive the email that your results are in, sign into your 23andme account and explore your results.

Advantage:  Over 4 million people around the world have DNA tested.  If you match them, you will see them in your DNA match list when you sign into your account.  You can download your DNA raw data from 23andme and upload it to Gedmatch.com (https://www.gedmatch.com/login1.php ) for FREE to find more DNA matches. This is a website that allows us that have tested at FTDNA.com, 23andme.com, Wegene.com, and Ancestry.com , to upload there to find more family. And yes! It is FREE.

You can also upload your DNA raw data to https://www.familytreedna.com/ for FREE.

Limitations of 23andme: This test will not tell you the African ethnic groups that you share ancestry with. However, you may find African DNA matches that can tell you their ethnic group(s) and where they come from. Also when you upload to Gedmatch, you may find African matches that have also uploaded there.

YOU research, YOU decide

https://www.23andme.com/

23andme.com Results

 

 

3. https://www.familytreedna.com/ Starting at $79 for the family finder test.   ( cheek swab ) **If you already DNA tested at ancestry.com or 23andme.com , please go to FTDNA and upload your DNA raw data from those sites to this one for FREE. It will SAVE you the cost of $99. FTDNA’s Autosomal DNA test is $99. (Keep in mine that your autosomal DNA is 50 % from your father and 50% from your mother) 

They also have Mtdna tests for your Direct maternal line and YDNA tests for your direct paternal line. Only males can take the YDNA test. See the website for prices on their MtDNA and YDNA tests.

Regarding their Autosomal DNA test, they provide you with percentages of your ancestry and a list of DNA matches that you can contact. You can research with those DNA matches to determine if they match on your mother’s side or your father’s side of the family. The DNA kit is mailed to you, you provide a small sample of saliva and follow the instructions to activate the kit. Check with FTDNA to determine the current wait time for their test results. Once you receive the email that your results are in, sign into your FTDNA account and explore your results. You can download your DNA raw data from FTDNA and upload it to Gedmatch.com ( https://www.gedmatch.com/login1.php ) for FREE to find more DNA matches. You can download your DNA raw data from FTDNA and upload it to Gedmatch.com ( https://www.gedmatch.com/login1.php ) for FREE to find more DNA matches. This is a website that allows us that have tested at FTDNA.com, Myheritage.com , 23andme.com, Wegene.com, and Ancestry.com , to upload there to find more family. And yes! It is FREE.

Limitations for FTDNA: Their African database is LOW so you may not have very many matches. If you have a higher percentage of NON- African DNA, you may have a lot of DNA matches.

FTDNA.com Results

 

4.  Visit www.MyHeritage.com to see if their company is for you. Starting at $89 (often times on sale  for around $69) . Their AtDNA (autosomal) is a (cheek swab) test.  The Autosomal DNA test, provides you with percentages of your ancestry and a list of DNA matches (actual relatives)  that you can contact. You can research with those DNA matches to determine if they match on your mother’s side or your father’s side of the family. The DNA kit is mailed to you, you provide a small sample of saliva and follow the instructions to activate the kit. (Keep in mine that your autosomal DNA is 50 % from your father and 50% from your mother) 

Advantage:  This website accepts DNA raw data from ancestry.com , FTDNA.com and 23andme.com.  So if you already tested with these other companies, you only need to upload the data.  If you test with this company, you can download your DNA raw data from MyHeritage and upload it to Gedmatch.com ( https://www.gedmatch.com/login1.php ) for FREE to find more DNA matches. This is a website that allows us that have tested at FTDNA.com, Myheritage.com , 23andme.com, Wegene.com, and Ancestry.com , to upload there to find more family. And yes! It is FREE.

Limitations:  The DNA match database is still growing so you may not have a lot of matches  (cousins) on Myheritage.  However, uploading the DNA raw data to www.Gedmatch.com will surely give you more DNA matches.  

MyHeritage.com Results

 

5. Visit http://africanancestry.com/home/ to see if their company is for you. Starting at $200. Their MtDNA test about 8 markers of the HVR1 region. I would not recommend this company as a first choice at this point but it may be good after you have found that you have an African haplogroup with another company like FTDNA. This is a cheek swab test 

Advantage: If you took the YDNA test or MTDNA test with FTDNA and found that you have an African haplogroup, you may consider contacting them and paying around $200 to receive a certificate stating what African ethnic group(s) you share ancestry with. Their MtDNA and YDNA test starts at $285. ** About 35% of African Americans do NOT have African Mtdna line or YDNA line. See their website for details. Make an INFORMED decision.

Limitations of African Ancestry: They are the most costly DNA testing company for their YDNA, MtDNA test, and Autosomal. They do not test as many DNA markers as the other companies. The DNA raw data cannot be uploaded to any other website. They do not provide any DNA matches. If your test reveals your MtDNA line or your YDNA line is not African, you will not be able to find African relatives or African ethnic groups through them. You will need to test with one of the above companies. Source: http://shop.africanancestry.com/Mat… and http://shop.africanancestry.com/Pat… .

This test will not tell you that you are 100% of anything. It will not provide ANY percentages of your ethnicity. The percentages that they provide is a sequence similarity score. They test LESS than 1% of your DNA. The Cofounder can explain this to you.

 

AfricanAncestry.com Certificate Example

 

 

Make an INFORMED decision.

Please visit the website for each DNA test, research it and determine which company works for YOU!!

www.DNATestedAfricans.org

Note: All images belong to their perspective companies. This is for educational purposes to encourage research in order to make an informed decision about DNA testing.

Originally posted : https://www.facebook.com/notes/dna-tested-african-descendants/getting-started-dna-testing-options/1540241299613571/

 

Free African Americans of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Maryland and Delaware: Colonial Period

 

 

Highly recommend joining these two Societies.

Pinterest: Access 22 August 2017:  https://www.pinterest.com/pin/354517801888506810/

African Royal DNA Project

Click on the link for more information:
DNA Tested African Descendants and Roots to Glory Tours have partnered to bring you the African Royal DNA Project. This project is designed to assist Africans in the …
www.rootstoglory.com

Journey From Igboland to South Carolina

 

 

 Resource for further information: “The Voyage of the Slave Ship Hare”

I read This article four times to get a feeling for the author and the story. I realized I had transcended home to Igbo land.

Resource: Access August 9, 2017 – https://www.dnatestedafricans.org/single-post/2017/06/18/The-Invisible-Artifact-Something-Amazing-Happened

The Invisible Artifact ~ A Journey From Igboland to South Carolina

April 16, 2017

|

AdaaEze Naja Chinyere Njoku

A Dibia (native healer) in Igboland was awakened from a very disturbing dream. The gods were giving him a message. He went to the Eze (king) and informed him. The Eze told him to go and do what he was directed. He returned to the shrine after gathering wood from the sacred Iroko tree. He personally carved a mysterious artifact, creating a secret compartment at the bottom where he placed inside, a kola nut, alligator pepper , and a message.

 


Meanwhile, the Eze summonsed the town crier to have every elder male and elder female of each family to meet him at his palace immediately. They each arrived wondering why they were assembled at such a later hour. The Dibia returned with the artifact and explained that the gods told him of an impending danger.


He said that a tomb will float on the great water, bringing a choking white fog.
The fog would engulf many of the village people but some will survive. He advised
that when this horrible white smoke came, to run to a place near the evil forest
where they would be invisible to the naked eye. A great fear came over the
villagers because no one went near the evil forest unless they were cast out of the
village. It was an abomination.

The elders all began to speak at the same time.


The clanking sound of the Dibia’s staff striking the ground, caused a silence to
roll across the tongues of each person there. His eyes turned a hazy white as he
went into a trance. He said, “Out of this abomination, our people will return”. He
directed each elder to come to the artifact. He recited an incantation and told
each elder to touch a different area of it. When they touched it, that area displayed
a mystical glowing symbol that was not carved into the artifact.

It sealed their DNA into the symbols.

The Dibia explained that the mystical symbols would only glow when a descendant of the elder that touched it was near.


When the last elder touched the artifact, a second seal was placed upon it and another artifact, an exact duplicate appeared out of a puff of red smoke. They were all amazed. He kept the second artifact with him. It could only be passed from Dibia to his successor, until the time of reckoning.


The Dibia called the strongest man in the group. His name was Obinna (Obi). He was noticeable because of the bright spiritual glow about him that only he could see.
 

The guards were given instructions to hold him, regardless to what happened
next. They did. The Dibia placed a green herb in his mouth and pushed the
artifact into his chest. It started to burn his skin as he screamed in uncontrollable
pain. His skin divided and the artifact went inside of him. Then the pain was
gone as if nothing happened. Eze assigned him warriors to guard him day and
night. They were all sworn to secrecy to NEVER reveal what took place that night.

 

About 7 years later, the dreaded tomb came floating on the great water. The white
fog rolled all around it. Many were taken away in the fog while some made it
safely to the meeting place. A mother screamed in the darkness. She was unable
to find her son Obi. He was the one that the Dibia chose to hold the sacred
artifact inside of him.


 

Three Months on the Great Wata
 


The white fog took him and many others to a foreign land. Obinna (Obi) and those that
were with him in that dreadful tomb were placed on a block and sold into slavery.
Obi lived to be 97 years old. He had many children and grandchildren. They called him Papa Obi. They all remembered the stories he told of how he was brought to this place when the white fog came to his homeland. He told them of how he found that some of his age mates decided that they would rather drown themselves than to be enslaved. He even tried himself but the water would not take him. The artifact inside of him caused the water to push him back to the
surface and back away.


His children loved his stories and decided to research this place that seemed almost mythical. They found that it is now called Nigeria. Some call it Naija.  He always said he could still hear his mother’s voice from back home, guiding him, even until the day he died. His body was laid to rest in a beautiful wooden coffin at the foot of a huge tree, in a place now called South Carolina. His tombstone read ” Here lies Obinna, also known as Papa Obi, born 1724 in Nigeria; died 1821 in SC”.

Each year this amazing tree grows closer to its roots and has several knots and bends in it. There is no other tree like it in the whole land.  Some folks call it an angel oak tree.  Others call it a Spirit tree.  There has always been something different about that tree.

 


275 years later, in Nigeria….2016

A Dibia is awakened from a dream. He performed an incantation and retrieved
the artifact. He took it to the Eze and explained its history. The elders of each
family were called to witness the extraction of the message and the Kola nut. The
message read ““Out of this Obama Nation, our people will return. Obi is Ibo, SC”.
It was a peculiar message.


Several scholars, at the University, were called to try to decipher its meaning. It
was baffling. A Nigerian private investigator, named Emeka, was also contacted.
He was preferred because he was aware of the modern day technology as well as
the ancient customs of his people.


When Emeka was taken to see the artifact, one of the symbols glowed. It was a
tree with the letters SC at the bottom of the tree. He found that Obinna and he
shared the same ancestor. They were family! This investigation became a
personal journey. His family was taken by the white fog. Many questions
consumed him. Where are they now? What happened to them? Emeka had to
know.

His Journey to South Carolina began …

Read more by clicking on the link: https://www.dnatestedafricans.org/single-post/2017/06/18/The-Invisible-Artifact-Something-Amazing-Happened
 

Atlantic Slave Trade Genealogy

 

In order to help you find your DNA cousin’s, you need to understand the history of American slavery and culture today and an understanding of the East Coast of Africa. How to map your identity to a time in place. I am Igbo of a community long ago in African in Senegal with DNA links to Nigeria and Benin. Our Ancestors practiced the Islamic faith. We were forced to abandon our beliefs and accept Christianity by Protestants, Catholics, Methodist, Episcopal and the Church of England.
GenealogyBank Blog: Access August 21, 2017: https://blog,genealogybank.com/african-American-slave-trade-ships-records-for-genealogy.html

 

African American Slave Trade: Ships & Records for Genealogy
By Gena Philibert-Ortega March 3, 2014
Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this guest blog post, Gena searches old newspapers and other online resources to learn more about the African slave trade in America.

Throughout the course of the Atlantic Slave Trade, an estimated 12 million Africans were captured in their homeland and forcibly shipped across the Atlantic, on more than 35,000 voyages, starting in the 17th century* The African Diaspora scattered Africans throughout the Caribbean and Americas. The first slave ship to land in Colonial America went to Jamestown, Virginia, in August 1619. The name of the first African slave ship out of the United States was Desire, which sailed out of Massachusetts eighteen years later. This forced migration caused the displacement, torture, enslavement, and murder of many Africans.**

African slaves brought to the Americas were part of the “Middle Passage,” a voyage that began in Europe, stopped in Africa to unload supplies and pick up enslaved human cargo, and then traveled to American ports on the eastern coast to trade that human cargo for goods that were then shipped back to Europe.
History of the African Slave Trade in Early America and the United States Infographic (Note: the article continues after this infographic.)
History of the African Slave Trade in America
This troubling part of American history—and important part of African American history—can be uncovered and explored with patient historical research, including searching in old newspapers such as GenealogyBank’s online Historical Newspaper Archives.
Laws Slow—but Don’t Stop—the African Slave Trade
It would seem that the African slave trade to America would have been stopped by a law passed by the U.S. Congress in March 1807 that stated:
“That from and after the first day of January, one thousand eight hundred and eight, it shall not be lawful to import or bring into the United States or the territories thereof from any foreign kingdom, place, or country, any negro, mulatto, or person of colour, with intent to hold, sell, or dispose of such negro, mulatto, or person of colour, as a slave, or to be held to service or labour.”***
Genealogy Tip:
Read more about U.S. legislation in the 1800s regarding slavery in GenealogyBank’s Historical Documents section which contains The American State Papers and more.
However, the Act to Prohibit the Importation of Slaves and a similar law passed in the United Kingdom didn’t end the practice of the slave trade. Slave ships illegally continued to bring their human cargo to U.S. ports, and American newspapers continued reporting on the occasional capture of a slave ship into the 1840s. (Two ships, the Wanderer and the Clotilde, are reported to have brought slaves to the United States well into the 1850s.) As with the passage of most laws, those who would break the law don’t end their criminal deeds; instead, a black market thrives.
Slave Advertisements in Newspapers
Eighteenth-century newspapers found in GenealogyBank’s archives report of the comings and goings of slave ships when the African slave trade was still legal. From advertisements to shipping news articles, researchers can find mentions of slave ships names, their captains, and descriptions of the people on board.
In some cases, advertisements for the upcoming sale of slaves included information on the ship they would be arriving on. In this example from a 1785 South Carolina newspaper, Fisher & Edwards advertise that the ship Commerce, under Captain Thomas Morton, will be arriving from Africa’s Gold Coast with “upwards of 200 prime slaves” for sale.
ad for a slave auction, South-Carolina Weekly Gazette newspaper advertisement 6 August 1785
South-Carolina Weekly Gazette (Charleston, South Carolina), 6 August 1785, page 3
An earlier South Carolina advertisement proclaims that the slaves aboard Captain Buncombe’s ship Venus are “mostly stout men.”
ad for a slave auction, South-Carolina Weekly Gazette newspaper advertisement 17 July 1784
South-Carolina Weekly Gazette (Charleston, South Carolina), 17 July 1784, page 4
Slave Ship “Shipping News” in Newspapers
Articles under “Shipping News” or “Marine List” headlines are a good place to start searching for information about slave ships, crew, and cargo.
In this example from a 1799 New York newspaper, we see updates on various ships including information about deaths on ships. We also see that the Gurbridge and Mary were bringing slaves, and to whom they were being brought.
shipping news, Commercial Advertiser newspaper article 31 July 1799
Commercial Advertiser (New York, New York), 31 July 1799, page 3
Where to Find African Slave Trade & Slave Ship Records
After exhausting your research in newspapers, learn more about a particular slave ship by consulting the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database website, which houses information about slave ships from 1514 to 1866.
In some cases, digital collections may hold slave ship manifests, such as this example from the Metropolitan New York Library Council Digital Collections.
Don’t forget to look for finding aids like this one from the New York Historical Society’s Guide to the Slavery Collection 1709-1899.
The National Archives (NARA) houses resources that can assist in your research:
The Slave Manifests of Coastwise Vessels Filed at New Orleans, Louisiana, 1807-1860 website has “manifests filed with the collector of customs at New Orleans, Louisiana, of slaves transported in coastwise trade to or from New Orleans during the period 1807-1860.”
The Slave Manifests for the Port of Philadelphia, 08/1800-04/1860 website is from the same Record Group as the above manifests, Record Group 36: Records of the U.S. Customs Service, 1745-1997.
African American Slave Trade Infographic Research Sources:
http://www.africanamericancharleston.com/lowcountry.html
http://www.civilwar.org/education/history/civil-war-overview/slavery.html
http://www.dcte.udel.edu/hlp2/resources/slavery/slaves-US-1790-1860.pdf
http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/slavery/videos/origins-of-slavery
http://history1800s.about.com/od/slaveryinamerica/a/1807slaveact.htm
http://jacksonville.com/tu-online/stories/120201/met_7970180.html
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2005696251/
http://www.nps.gov/jame/historyculture/the-Royal-African-Company-supplying-slaves-to-jamestown.htm
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/history/on-african-american-migrations/
http://terrain.org/2012/columns/desires-past/
http://www.tennessee.gov/tsla/exhibits/blackhistory/aahtimelin.htm
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/09/02/AR2006090201097.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1688_Germantown_Quaker_Petition_Against_Slavery
http://www.yale.edu/glc/aces/germantown.htm

These online websites can be helpful, but research on the name of a slave ship should begin with historical newspapers. It’s in their advertisements and news articles that you will find mentions of the slave ships’ cargo, crew, and destination.
You are free to share the History of the African Slave Trade in Early America and the United States Infographic on your blog or website using the embed code below.
__________________
* The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database. http://www.slavevoyages.org/tast/index.faces. Accessed 23 February 2014.
** “March 2, 1807.” This Week in History, March. http://www.peacebuttons.info/E-News/images/peacehistorymarch.htm. Accessed 23 February 2014.
*** “An Act to Prohibit the Importation of Slaves into any Port or Place Within the Jurisdiction of the United States, From and After the First Day of January, in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Eight.” The Avalon Project. Yale Law School Lillian Goldman Law Library. http://avalon.law.yale.edu/19th_century/sl004.asp. Accessed 23 February 2014.

Genealogy Events August

ancestry data in one simple screen
Genealogy Events
DNA Events

Thursday, Aug 24 Salt Lake City, UT
Family Search
11:00 am

Charles Whitehead Public Library Wewahitchka, FL
Power Contained: The Art of Authority in Central and West Africa
11:00 am

University of Michigan Museum of Art Ann Arbor, MI
Genealogy Help
1:00 pm

Gloucester County Public Library Gloucester Courthouse, VA
Getting the Most from FamilySearch
6:15 pm

California Genealogical Society & Library Oakland, CA
Genealogy Club
6:30 pm

Bloomingdale Public Library Bloomingdale, IL
Meetup at The Family Tree to play scrabble
6:30 pm

The Family Tree Amherst, NY
Genealogy Assistance – DAR
7:00 pm

*Davie County Historical and Genealogical Society Meeting
7:00 pm
Mocksville, NC

Friday, Aug 25
KCGS photo sessions Sunset Ridge
9:00 am
Sunset Ridge Cemetery Kenosha, WI

Zion Living History Tours
10:00 am
Zion Cemetery & Baynard Mausoleum Historic Site Hilton Head Island, SC
Bicester: Family History Help Desk
10:00 am
Bicester Library Bicester
Power Contained: The Art of Authority in Central and West Africa
11:00 am

University of Michigan Museum of Art Ann Arbor, MI
Genealogy Open Lab
11:30 am

Truckee Meadows Community College Reno, NV
Genealogy Meetup
2:30 pm

Washington District Library Washington, IL
Late Night Genealogy
5:00 pm

Town and Country Public Library Elburn, IL
Saturday, Aug 26
Family History Workshops
10:00 am

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Hermiston, OR
Genealogy Basics
10:00 am

Longmont, CO
A Grave Matter in Indiana
10:00 am

Allen County Public Library System Fort Wayne, IN
Abingdon: Family History Help Desk
10:00 am

Abingdon Library Abingdon
Power Contained: The Art of Authority in Central and West Africa
11:00 am

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