Help Drive Research Forward for African Americans

23andMe Post

We believe genetics and the study of disease should be for everyone.
All ethnicities. All people.

Help drive research forward for African Americans.

Join now!

Questions: contact study-help@23andMe.com

Why your help is so important.

Less than 5% of research on the genetics of disease includes people of African ancestry. If people with diverse ancestries continue to be underrepresented in genetics research, then we risk missing key medical and other scientific discoveries that could benefit everyone.

If you participate in the African American Sequencing Project, you could help address this disparity. By sharing your genetic data with the scientific community, you can shape the future of genetics research to include people of African descent.

Only a fraction of genetic research studies have included people of African descent.

Popejoy, A. B. & Fullerton, S. M. Nature 538, 161-164 (2016).

See if you’re eligible

To be eligible for this study you must be a 23andMe customer, have consented to 23andMe Research, self identify as African or African American and be at least 18 years old.

How it works

You do not need to provide a new saliva sample — we will use the one you already sent us.

There is no cost to participate.

You consent to share your genetic data.

Enroll and agree to share your de-identified genetic information with researchers approved by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and qualified research partners of 23andMe.

None of your contact information or answers to 23andMe surveys will be shared.

We will sequence your genome.

If you are selected, we will send your saliva sample, already provided to 23andMe, to a lab for whole genome sequencing. Whole genome sequencing is a more thorough but also more costly review of your genome than that provided by the genotyping analysis used to generate your 23andMe reports. *This is extremely important. The real cost to an individual is about $1200 with most labs. Entire genome sequencing means all of your DNA in your body. I am a member of the Ethnicity Research Group studying and identify the location specific location of African and African-American ancestors and I also participate in the L2 study group, this later group requires identification with a person of African origin. right now these two groups are closed.

For more information on sequencing versus genotyping watch this video or read this article.

We will provide data to researchers around the world.

23andMe will share this sequenced genetic data with researchers by depositing it into a scientific database approved by the NIH. Approved researchers will have access to this data to conduct genetics research.

About this project

In October 2016, 23andMe was awarded a grant by the National Human Genome Research Institute, a major research arm of the National Institutes of Health, to fund the African American Sequencing Project.

This project is part of our broad commitment to diversity in genetics research. Learn more about 23andMe’s Roots into the Future Project.

Privacy and Security

We do not share your genetic information without your explicit authorization. Only you can decide if you would like to participate in this project by authorizing 23andMe to share your information with outside researchers.

Even though you previously consented to participate in 23andMe Research, you will need to read and accept additional consents to participate in this study.

Hi. Have additional questions about the African American Sequencing Project?

If you don’t see your question here, get in touch with us.

  • What does it mean to be a research participant in this project?

  • Why is 23andMe conducting the African American Sequencing Project?

  • Will you share my genetic data with third parties?

  • Do I need to provide a new saliva sample to 23andMe?

  • How will you protect the confidentiality of my data?

  • What is whole genome sequencing? How is this process different from genotyping, the process previously used by 23andMe to analyze the DNA in my saliva sample?

  • How do you select participants for this study?

  • Will I have access to my sequenced data?

  • What am I agreeing to if I accept the consent documents for this project?

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