Rumble from RootsTech

The Legal Genealogist: DNA doings in

2017


 

DNA doings in 2017

Posted: 12 Feb 2017 09:10 AM PST

Rumbles from RootsTech

Lots of DNA developments are coming down the pike and RootsTech 2017 attendees got an eyeful and earful about — and sometimes a sneak peek at — what’s to come.

2017dnaLet’s take it company by company and hit the highlights.

23andMe

Not much new in the way of announcements or developments from 23andMe but a sale price good through February 14th that’s enough to perhaps entice a few genealogists to think about testing here. The ancestry-only option is down from its usual $99 to just $79 plus shipping for the U.S. market.

That price should be available to anyone on the 23andMe website.

AncestryDNA

After blowing the bottom off the price point for tests with an in-person-attendee-only sale price of $49 for its autosomal test, AncestryDNA followed with the announcement by CEO Tim Duncan that a new “DNA communities” feature will be rolled out to all users shortly.

The new feature is an additional layer of granularity on the ethnicity estimates, grouping test-takers into regional and localized communities based their DNA results. So, for example, instead of just Irish, a user might be told her DNA was consistent with a community of users from west Ireland, down to a county or even smaller level.

The new communities are the result of research done by the science team that was published recently in the peer-reviewed journal, Nature.

Family Tree DNA

Matching AncestryDNA with a show price of $49 for one day of RootsTech, Family Tree DNA also extended its regular show-sale prices to all users through February 18th. The autosomal Family Finder test is available for just $69 plus shipping and other test bundles are also available.

The coupon code for the autosomal test is LF3CG, and that will work for other tests as well. For the mtDNA test, use coupon code TBN2Y.

Living DNA

The newest entrant to the international DNA testing market is British-owned Living DNA. This company hopes to provide the most detailed ethnicity estimates on the market and has so far shown great promise with drilling down to local levels in its analysis of U.K. ethnicities.

Whether the company will succeed in extending its research to the European continent and to the highly-admixed U.S. with its melting-pot ethnic market is an open question, but the company shows promise and appears worth watching.

The $159 regular test price in the U.S. will include autosomal results plus YDNA and mtDNA results for males and mtDNA results for females.

And, yes, in the spirit of “I never met a DNA test I wouldn’t take,” The Legal Genealogist did swab… we’ll see how these folks do with my 50% admired colonial American and 50% German ethnicity.

MyHeritage DNA

MyHeritage is also a new entrant to the DNA testing field, offering an autosomal DNA test only. The company began by allowing free uploads of raw data from other test companies with free matching as an incentive to build its database.

MyHeritage expects to offer detailed ethnicity estimates soon based on its unique Founder Population data collection and analysis, and announced at RootsTech that it had hired Columbia University’s Dr. Yaniv Ehrlich (of DNA Land) as its chief DNA science officer. Early beta results are available now, but will be greatly refined as analysis continues.

The upshot

What we’re seeing today in the DNA field is a veritable explosion in both the number of test takers and the number of test companies working to make DNA results more useful and more meaningful — or at least more entertaining.

The growth has been so dramatic, so exponential, that it’s often hard to remember that it hasn’t even been a decade since the very first autosomal tests became available and only a few years more than that when YDNA and mtDNA testing for genealogy began.

It’s an exciting time to be a genetic genealogist…

Sent from my iPad

Y-DNA Testing FTDNA

 

dna-84px-adn_animation

Source: FamilyTreeDNA (http:www.familytreedna.com/learn/dna-basics/ydna)

Paternal Lineages Tests

Your direct paternal lineage is the line that follows your father’s paternal ancestry. This line consists entirely of men.

Y-DNA follows the direct paternal line.

Your Y-chromosome DNA (Y-DNA) can trace your father, his father, his father’s father, and so forth. It offers a clear path from you to a known, or likely, direct paternal ancestor.

DNA Matching for Family History

Your Y-DNA may help you find genetic cousins along your direct paternal line. Planned comparisons are the best choice. To set up a planned comparison, select two men who you believe share a direct paternal ancestor. Have both men take a Y-DNA test. If they match exactly or closely, then the DNA evidence supports the relationship. If they do not match, the result is evidence refuting the relationship. When you discover a match outside of a planned comparison, you can still find your common ancestor with matches. To do so, use your known paternal genealogy. For each match, look first for a shared surname if you come from a culture where surnames have followed paternal lines. Then look for common geographic locations on the direct paternal line. Work through each of your ancestors on this line as well as their sons, their sons’ sons, and so forth. Comparing genealogy records is vital when using Y-DNA matching to help you in your research. You need to enter all that you know about your direct paternal line in your myFTDNA account.

The Science of Your Direct Paternal Line

Your Y chromosome is a sex chromosome. Sex chromosomes carry the genetic code that makes each of us male or female. All people inherit two sex chromosomes. One comes from their mother and the other from their father. You and other men receive a Y chromosome from your father and an X chromosome from your mother. Men and only men inherit their father’s Y chromosome. Thus, it follows the same path of inheritance as your direct paternal line. Paternal line DNA testing uses STR markers. STR markers are places where your genetic code has a variable number of repeated parts. STR marker values change slowly from one generation to the next. Testing multiple markers gives us distinctive result sets. These sets form signatures for a paternal lineage. We compare your set of results to those of other men in our database. The range of possible generations before you share a common ancestor with a match depends on the level of test you take. A match may be recent, but it may also be hundreds of years in the past.

Probability that your common ancestor lived no longer than this number of generations ago.

Genetic Distance 50% 90% 95%
0 2 4 5
1 3 6 7
2 5 8 9
3 6 10 11

Probability that your common ancestor lived no longer than this number of generations ago.

Genetic Distance 50% 90% 95%
0 2 5 7
1 4 8 9
2 6 12 14

Probability that your common ancestor lived no longer than this number of generations ago.

Genetic Distance 50% 90% 95%
0 2 5 7
1 4 8 10
2 6 12 14

Probability that your common ancestor lived no longer than this number of generations ago.

Genetic Distance 50% 90% 95%
0 7 23 29
1 17 39 47

The wide range in the test results does not prevent those results from being useful. You can use this clear paternal line to provide evidence to support a relationship. You first trace two or more male lineage descendants of a single man utilizing traditional genealogy research. The descendants then test their Y-DNA. If they match, it is evidence that supports the relationship. Not matching exactly or closely disproves the relationship. We report your STR marker results as the measured number of repeats for each marker. In the example below, the marker DYS393 has 12 repeats.

Marker DYS393 DYS39 DYS19 DYS391 DYS385 DYS426
Value 12 23 12 10 16–16 11

Over many generations, the number of repeats in each STR marker changes. The number of repeats may go up or down. These changes create the signatures for individual lines. This process is random. It is not possible to predict that any one marker will change between any set of generations. We do know though how often on average these random changes happen. Thus, we can estimate how closely related two men are by using the similarity of their results.

Your Ancestral Origins

Our Y-DNA marks the path from our direct paternal ancestors in Africa to their locations in historic times. Your ancestors carried their Y-DNA line on their travels. The current geography of your line shows the path of this journey. You can learn about the basics of your line’s branch on the paternal tree from your predicted branch placement. This information comes from scientists who study the history of populations across geography and time using Y-DNA. They use both the frequencies of each branch in modern populations and samples from ancient burial sites. With these, they are able to tell us much about the story for each branch. This traces back hundreds, thousands, or even tens of thousands of years. Your branch on the tree tells you where your paternal ancestors are present today and about their likely migration paths. This is your Y-DNA haplogroup.

 

DNA Testing Choice

 

 

Written by Ellen Hinkley
3 February 2017

Source: DNA Testing Choice@DNATestingChce (The UK’s leading news and reviews site for the DNA Test you can buy online) access 2/7/2017

DNA Testing Choice

DNA Testing Choice

When it comes to DNA testing to explore your genetic heritage, there are three main types of test that you can take: Genetic ancestry tests, genetic predisposition tests and trait tests.

Ancestry tests can report on your ethnic mix and allow you to trace your ancestry back hundreds of thousands of years. There are three main types of genetic ancestry test: Y-DNA testsmitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) tests and autosomal DNA tests.

Genetic predisposition tests can be used to identify any medical conditions that you might be predisposed to suffer with later in life. Trait tests can report on the physical or psychological attributes you’ve inherited. For example, you may discover that you’re predisposed to anger quickly, and that your short temper is part of your genetic heritage!

If you’d like to explore your DNA heritage with an ancestry test, we’ve listed the companies that provide genetic ancestry testing. If you’re more interested in understanding how your genetic heritage could affect your health, then check out the companies selling genetic predisposition tests such as Veritas Genetics. If you’re wondering about the traits that you’ve inherited, our personality testing listings are a good place to start!

Genetic ancestry tests

As discussed, there are three main types of genetic ancestry test: Y-DNA testsmitochondrial DNA tests and autosomal DNA tests.

Y DNA tests
Y DNA tests analyse the Y chromosome which is passed down from father to son – for this reason, only males can take this type of test. Y DNA tests allow you to trace your paternal line (your father’s father’s father etc.) by revealing your paternal ‘haplogroup’ – a code used to describe the individuals with whom you share a common paternal ancestor. Your paternal haplogroup can be used to reveal the migratory path that your paternal ancestors took after leaving Africa 100,000-200,000 years ago. Some Y DNA tests will also allow you to find living relatives on your paternal line, to help you undertake DNA genealogy. You can find out more about tracing your paternal heritage with a Y DNA test in our article: What is a Y DNA test?

Mitochondrial DNA tests
Mitochondrial DNA testing provides similar information to Y DNA testing, but instead analyses the DNA that you inherit exclusively from your mother. Mitochondrial DNA is passed down from mother to child, regardless of gender, so anyone can take this type of test. Similarly to Y DNA tests, mitochondrial DNA tests will provide you with your maternal haplogroup, allowing you to explore your maternal genetic heritage going back several hundred thousand years. Some mitochondrial DNA tests are also genealogical DNA tests, helping you to find living relatives on your maternal line. You can read more about mitochondrial DNA testing in our article: What is a mitochondrial DNA test?

Autosomal DNA tests
Autosomal DNA testing allows you to explore your more recent genetic heritage (the last five to six generations of your family), by analyzing 22 of the 23 pairs of chromosomes that you inherit from your parents (your autosomes). Because your autosomes recombine shortly after you’re conceived, it’s not possible to identify which autosomal segments you’ve inherited from which parent, so these tests give you a combined view of your genetic heritage from both parents.

Autosomal DNA tests (sometimes known as ethnicity tests) will reveal the ethnic groups who’ve contributed to your DNA, and some tests double as genealogy DNA tests, allowing you to find living relatives with whom you share segments of your autosomal DNA. You can read more about autosomal DNA testing in our article: What is an autosomal DNA test?

Genetic Predisposition testing

Another method of exploring your DNA heritage by taking a genetic predisposition test – these allow you to assess your genetic risk of developing medical conditions, from cancers and chronic diseases, to allergies, intolerances, and ailments like back pain. There are a number of private companies that offer genetic predisposition testing in our health section, so you can see what the likes of Veritas Genetics offer.

One well publicized example of a condition that you can be genetically predisposed to is breast cancer. Although anyone can suffer with breast cancer at some point in their lives (even men), the level of risk varies from person to person. If you were to inherit certain genetic variants in the ‘BRCA’ genes from your parents, your risk could be significantly higher than average.

Fortunately, a genetic predisposition test can reveal the presence of these ‘problem variants’, and help you prepare for the future. In 2013, actress Angelina Jolie revealed that she had undergone a mastectomy in response to the results of such a test. Since then, the number of people using genetic predisposition tests to screen for problem variants in the ‘BRCA1’ and ‘BRCA2’ genes has increased by nearly 40%.

Something worth pointing out is that testing for problem variants in the BRCA genes is a rare example of a genetic test that you can potentially get for free. If one of your close relatives has already tested positive for these variants, or you have a history of breast cancer in the family, you may be eligible for a genetic predisposition test on the NHS. If this is something you’re keen to explore, we recommend that you discuss your options with your doctor.

Something worth pointing out is that several health insurance companies now cover part of the cost of testing for genetic variants in the BRCA genes, providing you have a strong familial link to the disease. If you’re interested in a genetic predisposition test and you think you might be eligible for this type of coverage, it’s worth getting in touch with your health insurance provider before purchasing. If your insurance doesn’t cover the cost, or you don’t have health insurance, there are other ways of reducing the price of the test, and you should discuss your options with your physician.

What does the term ‘genetic predisposition’ actually mean?
There are a few things that you should be aware of if you’re considering a genetic predisposition test. Firstly, it’s important to understand that in most cases, carrying a genetic variant that’s associated to a medical condition doesn’t necessarily mean that you will go on to develop it. The results you receive will show how much more or less likely than average you are to suffer with the condition, according to the current published research.

If you’re facing an increased risk, the company conducting the test will normally tell you what you can do to reduce these risks. On the other hand, if your test reveals that you’re facing a decreased risk, it’s worth bearing in mind that this doesn’t mean you’re immune to the condition.

Once you’ve identified your ‘genetic risk’ of suffering with a medical condition, you should bear in mind that this is not the whole story. For the vast majority of conditions, many non-genetic factors can affect your risk e.g. your diet, your weight, whether you’re a smoker.

Incurable conditions
If you’re considering a genetic predisposition test for an incurable condition such as Alzheimer’s disease or Parkinson’s disease, it’s important to think carefully about the repercussions of discovering you have an increased risk. Many people who’ve seen elderly relatives suffer with such conditions have wanted to know if an increased risk is part of their DNA heritage, whilst many others would prefer not know. There are many benefits to identifying a heightened risk to an incurable condition – you may wish to try new treatments to mitigate its onset, plan your retirement differently, or sign up for trials in order to help seek a cure. On the other hand, if you discover you have a heightened risk, it’s not possible to ‘unknow’ this information, and you may be better off not knowing than learning about something that’ll cause you stress and anxiety.

Genetic Counselling
If you purchase a genetic predisposition test through your medical professional, you’ll normally receive genetic counseling both before and after you take the test. This will allow you to learn about the potential outcomes of the test and ask any questions beforehand. Once the results are in, you’ll have the support you need to explore your options moving forward.

If you purchase a genetic predisposition test through a private company, make sure you check their website to see if genetic counseling is part of the service. Though many company websites will explain the test, its limitations and the potential outcomes, for serious medical conditions, we’d strongly recommend you buy from a company that offers ‘face to face’ or phone support, once you receive your results.

Carrier screening
As well as testing for your own predisposition to medical conditions, you may wish to undertake ‘carrier screening’ to assess the risk of your passing on conditions to your children. One of the most common types of carrier screening is for cystic fibrosis, a condition which is caused by a genetic variant in the ‘CFTR’ gene. You may discover that although your partner and yourself do not suffer with a medical condition, you may both carry a problem genetic variant that means there’s a chance that your children will develop one. If this turns out to be the case, there are measures you can take, such as IVF with preimplantation genetic diagnosis, to reduce the chances of your child inheriting the condition.

Raw data

It’s worth noting that many genetic ancestry companies will let you download your digitized genetic data after you take their test: 23andMe, Family Tree DNA and Ancestry.com are three such companies. By downloading your ‘raw data’ (a zipped file that’s normally under 20 MB) you’ll be able to upload it to a number of third parties that can re-analyse it for free or for a small fee. This will often reveal additional information about your ancestral heritage, or potentially identify new genetic variants that are associated to an increased risk of suffering with a medical condition.

Inherited traits

Tests for your genetic heritage aren’t limited to those that uncover your ancestry or establish your risk of suffering with (or carrying) a medical condition, they can also be used to reveal the physical and psychological traits that you’ve inherited.

The most popular trait tests are those that can provide training or nutritional plans that are tailored to your DNA, to help you achieve your fitness goals. This type of testing is possible because a number of the genetic variants that you’ve inherited are linked to how effectively you respond to certain types of exercise, your predisposition to injury, and your metabolism. If these types of test are of interest, then check out the companies selling fitness and diet DNA tests such as Fitness Genes and DNAFit.

Other tests for inherited traits will report on your caffeine metabolism, earwax type, hair curl, and all sorts of other physical characteristics that make up your genetic heritage. Many of the traits you can test for may be interesting but won’t impact your life whatsoever. On the other hand, if you’re concerned about male pattern baldness and you wish to test for this trait, taking a test may allay your fears or encourage you to seek treatment options while you still can!

Personality testing
There are also genetic tests for your personality traits which can reveal the characteristics that are part of your genetic heritage (nature) vs. those arising from your upbringing (nurture). Genetic personality tests are relatively new, but the studies supporting the associations between genetic variants and aspects of your character are growing in number. You can test for traits such as confidence, spontaneity, optimism, sex drive, aggression, and many many more! Some of these tests will also include a personality quiz to take non-genetic factors into account, to give you a more accurate picture of the psychological forces at work.

African-American Genealogy Lineup Rootstech 2017

 

 

African-American Genealogist Lineup Rootstech-2017

The countdown is on to RootsTech 2017! I can’t wait to see all my Genfriends and meet new ones. This year I’ll be presenting at RootsTech (see schedule below), and blogging, posting and tweeting live from the conference as a RootsTech Ambassador.

Last year was my first year attending RootsTech, the largest genealogy conference on the planet, held annually in Salt Lake City, Utah. It was an amazing experience. With more than 200 breakout class sessions to choose from, you can grow your skills and learn how to overcome tough challenges that arise in your research. The Expo Hall features hundreds of vendors of the latest apps, services and technology to help you make the most of all the tech devices you use in your research.

This year, I’m excited by two new offerings at RootsTech – the Coaches’ Corner, and a robust lineup of African American genealogy sessions.

In the Coaches’ Corner, located in the Expo Hall, certified genealogists will be available to answer your burning genealogy questions. You’ll have an opportunity to work one on one with experts who can help you overcome even the toughest genealogy brick walls.

And, this year, for the first time, you can fill your entire time at RootsTech attending sessions on African American genealogy! Please read on to view African American genealogy sessions for each day of the conference. Excited? The next step is to register for RootsTech 2017. Hope to see you there, and if you can’t attend this year, please watch for our live updates during the conference!

Thursday, February 9

Horizontal Splitter

Using Genealogical Periodicals for Research

Presenter: Frazine Taylor
Frazine Taylor | Intermediate
Thursday, February 9
11:00am

Although genealogical periodicals offer many sources of hidden information, they are often overlooked or underused by family historians in researching family history. The question becomes why do you think we do not search periodicals for our families? They are too hard, no index, some may have yearly indexes or none at all, just to name a few of the obstacles that makes periodical research difficult and underused. They are often Society publications and the resources necessary to make them widely available are scarce. However, the genealogical information in them are voluminous and genealogical and historical societies have published them for decades.This workshop will focus on the value of published cumulative indexes and time-saving tips to narrow the search for an ancestor using examples found in national periodicals and Alabama’s periodical collection.

Room: 255A
Session number: RT0763
RootsTech Track

Horizontal Splitter

Mapping the Freedmen’s Bureau: New Research Guide

Presenters: Angela Walton-Raji and Toni Carrier
Toni Carrier, Lowcountry Africana; Angela Walton-Raji, Mapping the Freedmen’s Bureau | Beginner
Thursday, Feb 9
1:30pm

The records of the Freedmen’s Bureau are among the richest for tracing African American ancestors. FamilySearch recently announced the completion of the Freedmen’s Bureau Project, a collaborative effort to index all surviving Freedmen’s Bureau records. A new website developed by Angela Walton-Raji and Toni Carrier, “Mapping the Freedmen’s Bureau” (www.mappingthefreedmensbureau.com) is an interactive map interface to help researchers make the most of Freedmen’s Bureau records by identifying the Freedmen’s Bureau field office, hospital or contraband camp nearest their area of research interest, to make these records all the more accessible. This session will present an overview of the Mapping the Freedmen’s Bureau website and present a case study which illustrates the importance of digging deeper into these valuable records after searching the FamilySearch index.

Room: 251D
Session number: RT1036
RootsTech Track

Horizontal Splitter

Exploring the Testimonies of Former Slaves in the Southern Claims Commission Records

Presenter: Bernice Bennett
Bernice Bennett, BB’s Genealogy Research and Educational Services, LLC | Intermediate
1:30pm

This session will explore the Southern Claims Commission Records that were created based upon losses in twelve states after the Civil War. The claimants testimony included a list of losses and witnesses to support those losses. These records produced eye witness testimonies from former slaves, family members and neighbors. Freedmen provide details about their lives and knowledge of their former enslavers.

Room: 255A
Session number: RT0772
RootsTech Track

Horizontal Splitter

From Nurses to Cooks: Black Women in the Civil War

Presenter: Angela Walton-Raji
Angela Walton-Raji, Mapping the Freedmen’s Bureau | Beginner
Thursday, February 9
3:00pm

This workshop will explore the surprising records that reflect the names of women of color who served in multiple jobs during the war and will explain how to find them. Surprisingly there are service records, and even pension files that describe the work performed by these women. These records point to unwritten chapters in American history, and hopefully will pull back another layer of many untold stories of ordinary people who did extraordinary things.

Room: 250D
Session number: RT0805
RootsTech Track

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Census Data: More Than Just a Population Count

Presenter: Janis Forte
Janis Forte | Beginner
Thursday, February 9
3:00pm

Every genealogist is familiar with Schedule I of the federal census as the official population count. However, this schedule does not present the census in its entirety. In the form of supplemental schedules, each ten years congress authorized topical reports to describe growth in the country. Titled ‘supplemental schedules’, from 1820 to 1880 these reports capture data on agriculture, business, industry, mortality and social variables in the newly formed country. Now available in digitized format, these schedules aid in completing family composition. The schedules may identify missing and reveal cohort groups and community relations. These schedules list those in asylums, institutions and those incarcerated in a county jail or prison. With the growth of the internet, accessing these schedules provides valuable genealogical and community content information which expand the cultural and community of ancestors.

Room: Ballroom B
Session number: RT0615
RootsTech Track

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Freedmen’s Bureau Records on FamilySearch

Presenter: Ken Nelson
Ken Nelson, Family Search | Advanced
Thursday, February 9
4:30pm

In 1865 the Freedmen’s Bureau was established in the South to provide assistance to freedmen and refugees. It provided to those in need food, medicine and clothing, established schools, and hospitals, provided transportation, helped with labor contracts and assisted soldiers with pension claims. For many researchers with African American ancestry, Bureau records are a starting point in making that link to that first generation of former slaves. This class will focus on the Freedmen’s Bureau records on FamilySearch by understanding how best to search the record images, the scope of the Discover Freedmen Project, by looking at the records that were indexed and discuss a strategy for using the records with other Reconstruction era collections such as census records, and voter registrations.

Room: 255D
Session number: RT1046
RootsTech Track

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Friday, February 10

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African American Genealogy for Newbies

Presenter: Nicka Smith
Nicka Smith, Who is Nicka Smith, BlackProGen | Beginner
Friday, February 10
1:30pm

America’s youth both between 1982 and 2000 now number 83.1 million and are more diverse than the generations that preceded them with 44.2 percent being part of a minority race or ethnic group.1 Many of these Millenials identify as African American and have relatives who likely don’t check the same racial designation box as them who are eager to help them trace their genealogy. In this session, learn the basics of researching African American genealogy and have a safe space to ask burning questions.

Room: 255A
Session number: RT1666
RootsTech Track

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Dealing with African American Genealogy Challenges

Presenter: Shelley Murphy
Shelley Murphy | Beginner
Friday, February 10
3:00pm

All genealogy has the so-called brick walls or genealogy challenges. This session will help you consider your research goals, understand what are you looking for and what challenges you will face in researching African Americans. In addition attendees will be provided with some tools and online resources that are available to help combat the challenges.

Room: 255A
Session number: RT1457
RootsTech Track
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Identity by Descent: Using DNA to Extend the African-American Pedigree

Presenter: Shannon Christmas
Shannon Christmas, Through The Trees Blog | Intermediate
Friday, February 10

4:30pm

Using illustrative examples, this session demonstrates how DNA analysis, when used in concert with traditional genealogical research methods, can help family historians overcome challenges unique to African-American genealogy research.

 

Room: 255A
Session number: RT1436
RootsTech Track
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Saturday, February 11

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The Art of Storytelling: It’s More Than Names & Dates

Presenter: Kenyatta Berry
Kenyatta Berry, Genealogy Roadshow | Beginner
Saturday, February 11
11:00am

 

When doing family research we often focus on the names, dates and locations of our ancestors. However, it’s important to develop a story using historical context. Learn how to use online resources, history and technology to create a compelling family story. Using my experience as a host on Genealogy Roadshow, I will talk about our development process from research to story to screen. You will walk way inspired to create your own family story.

 

Room: Ballroom A
Session number: RT2095
RootsTech Track
Horizontal Splitter

App Attack! Never Leave Home Without Them

Presenter: Shelley Murphy

Shelley Murphy | Beginner
Saturday, February 11
11:00am

Learning can happen anywhere. Researching & learning online are very useful tools for genealogists. Attendees will get a glimpse of some of the best online genealogy learning sites along with some genealogy cell phone applications. Some of the applications highlighted will be Ancestry, Family Tree, Genealogy Gems, Legacyfamilytreewebinars, Monticello, FindAGrave, & Ben Franklin’s World.

 

Room: Ballroom I
Session number: RT1434
RootsTech Track
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How to Get More from Your DNA with GEDMatch.com

Presenter: Shannon Christmas
Shannon Christmas, Through The Trees Blog | Beginner
Saturday, February 11
1:30pm

Learn how to mine your autosomal DNA results for genealogical gems using the most popular third-party tool for genetic genealogy.

 

Room: 255D
Session number: RT1440
RootsTech Track
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The Search for Our African Ancestor’s Birthplace

 

Originally posted: by Melvin Collier “Roots Revealed” on 01 Feb. 2017 and republished  by Nikka Smith: “The Lowdown by Black ProGen” 02 Feb. 2017.

I am posting this blog post and the short video clip below on the first day of Black History Month 2017, to emphasize that our Black history did not begin with American chattel slavery.

 

About six years ago, my cousin Dr. Jeffrey Ogbar and I discussed our family connection via my maternal grandmother. During the phone conversation, he told me how his Edwards family knew the name of their “Kunta Kinte.” In the 1970s, down in Panola County (Como), Mississippi, his great-uncle, the late Rev. Sidney Edwards, interviewed family elders. They shared with him how the first Edwards was a man named Luke Edwards, who was from Africa. Not only that, family elders had knowledge of his true African name that he told his family – OGBA(R) OGUMBA. I was fascinated to hear this! I was also “green with envy” because this was the type of family history that I longed to have. I remember saying to Cousin Jeff, “Wow! You all are so blessed to have this kind of family history. This is rare!

earlyedwardshistory_clipped

 

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